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Thread: Best Iman Shumpert comparison?

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    Default Best Iman Shumpert comparison?

    I like Larry Hughes/Tyreke Evans.

    How about you guys?

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    Hannibal Lecter TR1LL10N's Avatar
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    Physically I'd compare him to a young D wade.

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    Corey Brewer. I guess he'll be benched, dnp'd, and traded to a contender before we know it.

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    Originally Posted by Red
    Corey Brewer. I guess he'll be benched, dnp'd, and traded to a contender before we know it.
    Are you serious? Corey Brewer doesn't have passing/balling handling ability like Iman, nor was he an offensive slashing threat. Brewer was simply a quicker TeyShaun Prince type with lesser skill.

    Iman is more of a PG/SG, Brewer is more of a SF/SG...I can't see that comparison.

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    here's what cbssports.com thought, as far as a comparison:

    Compares To: ERIC SNOW, ex-Cleveland/Philadelphia -- Shumpert has experience at the both guard spots, and the ability to earn minutes as a combo type. Like Snow, his offense is a work in progress, as he is very inconsistent with his jumper or when shooting off the dribble. But he is a dominating face-up defender with excellent strength and overall athletic talent. He needs to bulk up more to play shooting guard at the NBA level, but is more the type that will get 15-20 minutes playing pressure defense rather than relied upon to attack the basket. He has a developing mid-range shot, but offers little shooting from the outside.

    --Dave-Te' Thomas

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    Originally Posted by TR1LL10N
    Physically I'd compare him to a young D wade.
    Yea, lets check out their measurements.

    Iman is bigger at 6"6 220 lbs where as Wade came into the league as 6"4 210

    Wade's measurements
    Wingspan 6' 10.75"
    Standing Reach 8' 6"
    Body Fat% 6.7
    No Step Vertical 31.5
    Max Vertical Leap 35.0
    Bench Press(185lbs) 9
    Agility 10.56
    Sprint 3.08

    Iman's measurements
    Wingspan 6' 9.5"
    Standing Reach 8' 3.5"
    Body Fat% 6.5
    No Step Vertical 36.5
    Max Vertical Leap 42.0
    Bench Press 18
    Agility 11.10
    Sprint 3.18


    So yea, Iman jumps higher and is stronger, Wade is longer(arms) and is more agility and faster. Both are physical freaks.

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    Fundamentally Sound ronoranina's Avatar
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    He has so much more vert than Snow tho... I like the Tony Allen and Larry Hughes comparisons I've heard.

    Welcome back Metro. I suppose your keyboard is in good working order by now, no? Just kidding dude..

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    Yea, my keyboard is working now, so you know who's back in charge in of the forum. I won't be active as here do with this job that got me on lock and amateur boxing this summer.

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    Originally Posted by metrocard
    Are you serious? Corey Brewer doesn't have passing/balling handling ability like Iman, nor was he an offensive slashing threat. Brewer was simply a quicker TeyShaun Prince type with lesser skill.

    Iman is more of a PG/SG, Brewer is more of a SF/SG...I can't see that comparison.
    Brewer 6'9 185lbs (college stats)

    11.3(ppg)- 47.9(fg%)- 35.6(3fg%)- 2.8(apg)- 4.3(rpg)- .4(bpg)- 1.6(spg)

    Shumpert 6'5 209lbs (college stats)

    12.7(ppg)- 39.6(fg%)- 30.5(3fg%)- 4.2(apg)- 4.5(rpg)- .2(bpg)-
    2.3(spg)

    Brewer is longer and lighter. Shump is shorter but heavier. Yes 2 different positions but to me the same player type. Defense is his best attribute. Corey shot better fg%'s, Shump the better passer and perimter defender.

    With a handle and developed outside game and coaching under CB he can be a force. But he like Brewer seem limited and have much work to do.

    No?

    And recall MOA had no use for Brewer so....

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    welcome back metro; sites better with you back

    larry hughes sounds nice he has the physical tools to be way better than him though.

    i personally see him as a wilson chandler except the PG/SG version. i love his game and everyone saying he cant shoot, well that comes with experience and apparently it was good enough for brass to draft em. he knows how to get to the basket and is probably the most athletic player in this draft the potential there. i see him the chandler mold

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    Originally Posted by Red
    Brewer 6'9 185lbs (college stats)

    11.3(ppg)- 47.9(fg%)- 35.6(3fg%)- 2.8(apg)- 4.3(rpg)- .4(bpg)- 1.6(spg)

    Shumpert 6'5 209lbs (college stats)

    12.7(ppg)- 39.6(fg%)- 30.5(3fg%)- 4.2(apg)- 4.5(rpg)- .2(bpg)-
    2.3(spg)

    Brewer is longer and lighter. Shump is shorter but heavier. Yes 2 different positions but to me the same player type. Defense is his best attribute. Corey shot better fg%'s, Shump the better passer and perimter defender.

    With a handle and developed outside game and coaching under CB he can be a force. But he like Brewer seem limited and have much work to do.

    No?

    And recall MOA had no use for Brewer so....
    They're totally different.

    Brewer was a spot up guy who didn't slash a lot due to his weak ball handling skills.

    Iman was a slasher who had A level ball handling skills for a guy at 6"6 who can play PG.

    Both play defense, but Iman was more physical body to body man defense, where as Brewer was a lanky defender who used his length.

    Iman played PG his first two seasons @ G-Tech

    Brewer played SF, strickly at Florida.

    How can you be limited when you play 3 positions, you're the best athlete in the draft, and one of the best perimeter defenders to come out the draft since Kyle Lowry? I don't get it.

    Are you trying to say his jumpshot is limited which will hinder him from playing in D'Antoni's offense?

    If thats what you're trying to say let me know.

    And a jumpshot doesn't limit you. Ask Amare Stoudimire and Trevor Ariza who both came into the NBA without a jumpshot. Look at them now.

    Iman is a hard worker who can adjust very quickly. Look at his career at GT.

    He went from being the PG to being the primary scorer his junior year. He's played about every role for that team and shown his versatility.

    Brewer and him are nothing alike except they're both good defenders.

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    Originally Posted by metrocard
    They're totally different.

    Brewer was a spot up guy who didn't slash a lot due to his weak ball handling skills.

    Iman was a slasher who had A level ball handling skills for a guy at 6"6 who can play PG.

    Both play defense, but Iman was more physical body to body man defense, where as Brewer was a lanky defender who used his length.

    Iman played PG his first two seasons @ G-Tech

    Brewer played SF, strickly at Florida.

    How can you be limited when you play 3 positions, you're the best athlete in the draft, and one of the best perimeter defenders to come out the draft since Kyle Lowry? I don't get it.

    Are you trying to say his jumpshot is limited which will hinder him from playing in D'Antoni's offense?

    If thats what you're trying to say let me know.

    And a jumpshot doesn't limit you. Ask Amare Stoudimire and Trevor Ariza who both came into the NBA without a jumpshot. Look at them now.

    Iman is a hard worker who can adjust very quickly. Look at his career at GT.

    He went from being the PG to being the primary scorer his junior year. He's played about every role for that team and shown his versatility.

    Brewer and him are nothing alike except they're both good defenders.
    I said limited based on his offensive production. Maybe you're right, I really didn't see much of him. And yeah you know he at least has to shoot well for Moa to use him.

    I've heard about his athletic abilities, also about his lack of consistency and leadership.

    I'd rather you tell me who's better

    Shump or your boy Fields?

    And really I viewed him as a combo playing the versitile Chandler role. If not is he our back up pg and future starter?

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    bleacherreport:

    Shumpert reminds me a lot of former draft bust Gerald Green, who was taken one spot later (No. 18) back in 2005 by the Boston Celtics because of his intriguing athletic abilities.

    Green played for four teams in five seasons before falling out of the league, and Shumpert will be looking to avoid that fate despite the obvious similarities in their games.

    The team can't afford to devote major minutes to developing a draft pick at either forward position with Carmelo Anthony and Amar'e Stoudemire on the team, so there will be more playing time available to Shumpert in the early going so he can hone his potential to the fullest extent.

    Shumpert's standing vertical leap (36.5") is the third-highest to have ever been recorded at the combine, but that's not going to make him a better basketball player. He really needs to learn to play the game in a smarter fashion without settling so often, because if he lives and dies with his perimeter game, it's going to result in an unsuccessful rookie season for both he and the Knicks.

    The team really needed to improve their defense on the wing and Shumpert will bring a presence on that end of the floor, but his offensive contributions are a major question mark heading into the 2011-12 campaign.

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    Check it out
    That's momentous news for Shumpert, who seemed certain to go low in the second round (or even undrafted) when he decided to forgo his senior season at Georgia Tech and enter the draft this spring. It's also difficult to fathom. Ford's reasoning (read: the reasoning of the NBA general managers who Chad talks to about these things) goes like this:
    The Wolves added some serious offensive pop with the arrival of Ricky Rubio and, in this mock, Derrick Williams. Shumpert would give them a major defensive presence in their backcourt. While he's not the most offensively gifted player in the draft, his ability to guard both backcourt positions, combined with his elite athleticism, make him an interesting choice at No. 20.

    I suppose I can understand that reasoning. Shumpert is a solid, versatile defender. Fair enough.

    Still, there are a handful of other solid, versatile defenders out there, and they happen to be players -- Nolan Smith, Shelvin Mack, Tyler Honeycutt, Jimmy Butler, E'Twaun Moore, even DeAndre Liggins! -- who are also a) able to play offense and b) likely to be available in the second round, via trade, or as undrafted free agents. All of those players experienced much greater levels of success in college than Shumpert did. All of them actively made their teams better, which is not something we could always say for the Georgia Tech guard.

    In his defense, Shumpert did improve during his junior season, and his 25.7 percent assist rate was encouraging. But it's hard not to feel like Shumpert is the beneficiary of that age-old draft red herring: workouts. Shumpert tested well at the draft combine. Scouts were impressed by his athleticism in individual sessions. "Hey, he jumps higher than we thought. Maybe he's not so bad after all!"

    The problem -- and college hoops fans already know this -- is that Shumpert has always been a great athlete. He's always "tested well." Between the lines, though, he's never played up to potential. He's never shot the ball well. He's never been an effective distributor. With Shumpert at the helm -- and this isn't entirely his fault; Paul Hewitt shares this blame, too -- Georgia Tech's offense has often looked downright lost.
    About combines...
    May 26, 2011
    Though the conclusions that we can draw from the vast majority of the athletic testing data is extremely limited, we'll nonetheless try to take something away from the information we've been presented with.

    Trying to pinpoint a player's athleticism based on their combine testing is akin to trying to get a feel for their basketball IQ by watching them play one-on-zero –it simply doesn't make all that much sense. It does help us get a very general idea of where a player is at in terms of physical conditioning and strength, which often speaks to their work ethic, but rarely sheds much light on what it really aims to portray.

    Unlike the NFL combine, all parties involved realize that few people put much stock in these results. Players aren't trained in running 40-yard dashes from their days in high school like most gridiron stars and simply aren't well versed in many of the events. Raw athletic data can be useful in a football setting where certain properties manifest themselves more completely on the field, but for the NBA's purposes, a player's ¾ court sprint team is virtually meaningless on the top end.

    In basketball, where anticipation and coordination play major roles in how players perform on the court, combine numbers will always take a back seat to how a player uses the tools it aims to measure in actual games. Scouts have done their homework, they know who the fastest players in the draft are, and know which athletes are the most explosive. The combine only provides them with a standardized metric that often fail to live up to the consistency of what they already know.

    Despite our reservations about the data, it still exposes some players who land at the extremes of each test, and gives us the chance to draw some historical perspectives on certain stats. The combine does a decent job exposing which players are truly lacking in some aspects physically. At the end of the day though, the numbers these players posted at the combine are only as valuable as their ability to use them on the floor, and no matter how many times a player runs or jumps beyond his perceived means on test day, if he doesn't “play athletic” in games, he's not going to magically change his ways at the next level.

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    The only thing I like about Fields is his IQ and Effort. I don't think he's a great fit for this team. If he can fit the Matt Barnes role, then lets keep him and use him a high minute role player, why not?

    Where as Iman can make the game easier for a guard like Toney Douglas. Having a SG that can pass and defend is HUGE. D. Stevenson was almost out of the NBA until he changed his game up and became a better passer in his career and played more defense, now he has a championship ring. I feel like Kiyaman typing this.

    Iman is the man, we'll just wait and see how he develops.

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