Page 6 of 20 FirstFirst 123456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 297

Thread: Fitness Thread

  1. #76
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Food portions


    teaspoon (5 ml)
    about the size of the top half of your thumb

    1 ounce (28 g)
    approximately inch cube of cheese
    volume of four stacked dice
    slice of cheese is about the size of a 3 1/2 inch computer disk
    chunk of cheese is about as thick as 2 dominoes
    1 handful (palm) of nuts

    2 ounces (57 g)
    1 small chicken leg or thigh
    1/2 cup of cottage cheese or tuna

    3 ounces (85 g)
    serving of meat is about the size of a deck of playing cards (3 exchanges)
    1/2 of whole chicken breast
    1 medium pork chop
    1 small hamburger
    unbreaded fish fillet

    1/2 cup (118 ml)
    fruit or vegetables can fit in the palm of your hand
    about the volume of a tennis ball

    1 cup (236 ml)
    about the size of a woman's fist
    breakfast cereal goes halfway up the side of a standard cereal bowl
    broccoli is about the size of a light bulb
    1 medium apple = A tennis ball

  2. #77
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    exrx.net


    Protein
    individuals protein requirement increases in response to exercise, then changes in protein metabolism will become apparent. When the body is in a homeostatic state, protein synthesis is equal to protein degradation and the protein requirement of the body for tissue maintenance is satisfied. The most common way to detect changes in protein metabolism is to assess nitrogen balance of the body.

    Positive nitrogen balance occurs when the total nitrogen excreted in the urine, feces and sweat is less than the total nitrogen ingested. Positive nitrogen balance must exist for new tissue to be synthesized. When dietary protein intake or total energy intake is inadequate to maintain tissues total nitrogen balance, negative nitrogen balance occurs and new tissue is unable to be synthesized. When the body is in nitrogen balance, protein and energy intake is sufficient to maintain tissue protein needs and the amounts of nitrogen entering and exiting the body are equal.

    The results of nitrogen balance studies on endurance athletes indicates that these athletes have protein requirements that exceed the USRDA of 0.8 g/kg/day. A study found that endurance athletes (defined as training for at least 12 hours per week for at least 5 years) require 1.37 g/kg/day of protein to maintain nitrogen balance compared to 0.73 g/kg/day for sedentary individuals.

    It appears that weight training can also lead to a daily protein requirement that exceeds the current USRDA. It has been found that 2.0 to 2.2 g/kg/day of protein was barely sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance during moderate intensity weight training. Furthermore, weightlifter's protein requirements increased proportionally to training intensity. Research has shown that 2.0 to 2.6 g/kg/day of protein are required for periods of very intense weight training, whereas protein intakes of 2.0 g/kg/day maintained a positive nitrogen balance during periods of less intense weight training.

    It is clear that athletes need to consume more protein than the current USRDA for 0.8 g/kg/day in order to maintain nitrogen balance. Conversely, since the requirements of carbohydrates, and overall calories also increase with physical activity, the recommended proportion of calories from protein does not change significantly. With a calorie sufficient diet, protein requirement values needed to maintain positive nitrogen balance of both weight trained and endurance trained athletes constitutes intakes of 12% to 20% of total daily calories.


    Average consumption for U.S. is 100 grams/day
    Protein requirements
    10% to 20% of the diet should be protein for sedentary individuals
    40 grams/day for females
    55-70 grams/day or 0.8 grams/kg body weight for males
    Recommended protein intake for athletes or physically active people (Paul 1989)
    Protein and carbohydrate requirements increase somewhat
    more calories
    ratio of protein to carbohydrates does not change
    12% to 20% of the total calories
    Increases slightly during an increase or change of training
    Surprisingly protein requirements for endurance athletes are greater than weight trained athletes
    Protein requirements increase when calories are insufficient

    Weight Loss

    Obese individuals eating a slightly higher protein diet (25% of calories from protein), lost significantly more weight and body fat than those eating a slightly lower protein diet (12% of calories from protein). (Skov, et. al., 1999)

    Overweight women consuming a diet with a carbohydrate/protein ratio of 1.4 (125 g protein/day) lost more weight and body fat than those eating a ratio of 3.5 (68 g protein/day).

  3. #78
    Member milchshake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    207
    Rep Power
    5

    Default

    good thread. IMOthere is no better exercise than pumping iron you can do endurance, muscle, bodybuilding whatever you want. chinning bar is also killer. but there is no big result if you got wrong diet ... I change my diet many times to high protein also try some supplements but I can't get more weight, my body mass index shows that I balance on short weight line.

  4. #79
    Veteran KBlack25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,668
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    Interesting stuff about protein metro, I guess I never realized how truly valuable it was in a diet, and how much good it could do for you...

    One question I have though is how do you feel about protein shakes, like the prepackaged stuff? I've read reviews online, mostly mixed reviews. Some say the stuff is valuable in a workout diet, others say the extra calories aren't worth it...I guess, what's the opinion of those in the field on the matter? Would you recommend them (and if so, any particular brand) or would you stay away altogether?

  5. #80
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,221
    Rep Power
    8

    Default

    If you're gonna do any weight training, ya better get some whey isolate, Casseine for night time (digest slower)

    Pro complex has two pretty good ones. They even have some in nutrition stores from grass fed cows, more natural, but lower protein per gram.

    If you work 40 hrs a wk, very unlikely you will get the amount of protein needed to sustain muscle growth from food alone. Serious body builders take in at least a gram of protein per lbs of weight.

  6. #81
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Becoming an amateur boxer in March.
    My client Xavier lost 25 pounds in 15 sessions, not bad, we have 85 more sessions. He can do 30 jump rope rotations. A month ago he couldnt even get over the rope. He's currently 270 lbs, started at 295.
    My other client, Sherry lost 21 pounds, got 3 more sessions with her.

    ****ing cold weather is such a turn off though...I like to warm up my body really hot, it sucks going into HIIT with a cold body, so I do pre-longed warm up.

    This week I am focusing on my endurance and cardio, boxing footwork, hand speed, and core strength and stability.

    Not going too crazy on strength conditioning with the upper and lower region, probably do a regular 3 set/15-20 reps of chinups/pullups/dips and a 600 push ups in 15 minutes once or twice this week. Work on the kettle bell lightly, arnold presses, squats, everything light this week.

    I'm 5"9 163...Looking to drop to 154 and stay strong there, walking around 154-162 lbs...so I'm not far off.

    Hows everyone doing?
    Any questions?

  7. #82
    Member NYKnuniversity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Boston,MA
    Posts
    490
    Rep Power
    5

    Default

    I'm hitting track season in about 2 weeks and have struggled to get in shape so far. Any tips to getting myself in shape for sprinting the 100m and 200m? I was running around 11.1 seconds in the 100m and 200m 21.9 in the 200m and was looking to improve upon those times. But I can't seem to get in the kind of shape I was last year. I'm running about 1500 yards in sprints and build-ups and I'm hitting the weight room pretty hard plus I'm doing pool workouts as well for resistance. Any specifics to help me feel better when I'm running? because this season has not felt good and man do I feel out of shape. Not to mention my abs look like s*** as well. Anyway you could help me with all these problems? lol

  8. #83
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Lets see your profiles.

    What are your favorite quotes for fitness?


    Do or do not. There is no try.

    Pain is your friend, It lets you know you are still alive

    Believe and Achieve
    Big isn't strong. Strong is strong.

    Once you learn to quit, it becomes a habit.

    When youíre happy and your smiling, haters are frowning. When you have a clear conscious and your mind is free, others are confused. When you can see where youíre going and no longer living in the dark, others are blinded by your light.


    What are your favorite exercise for each muscle group and the max reps/load?

    Quadriceps - Squat jump (12 reps X 80% of max)
    Hamstrings - good morning (12 reps X 80% of max)
    Gastrocnemius - Knee extention (12 reps X 80% of max)
    Soleus - Toe Raises (12 reps X 80% of max)
    Latissimus Dorsi - pullups (30 reps)
    Rectus Abdominis - planks(5 minutes)/bowed leg set ups(30 slow controlled reps)
    Obliques - russian twist (30 slow controlled reps)
    Pectoralis Major - Pushups (88 reps)
    Anterior Deltoid - Arnold Press (12 reps x 40lbs)
    Lateral Deltoid - Cable Lateral Raise (12 reps x 80% of max)
    Posterior Deltoid - Barbell Rear Delt Raise (12 reps x 80% of max)
    Tricep - Dips (30 reps)
    Bicep - Chin ups (28 reps)
    Forearms - pronation (12 reps of 10lb dumbells)
    Fullbody - kettlebells!!!!!


    [B]Favorite Cardio?[/b[
    Jumprope and shadowboxing

    Favorite Plyometric exercise?

    Favorite Sport to preform?
    Boxing

    Favorite snack?
    Almonds

    Favorite cheat snack?

    Fig Newtons

    Height, Weight, Age, Body Fat %?
    5"9
    163lbs
    21 years old
    7% bodyfat

  9. #84
    The One and Only KING~POETIQ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Queens the Foundation
    Posts
    1,807
    Rep Power
    7

    Default

    push-ups, sit-ups, squats, and 30 pound dumbells. ALL DAY, EVERYDAY.


    6'1'', 172lbs., 25 y'o , body fat: ???

  10. #85
    The One and Only KING~POETIQ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Queens the Foundation
    Posts
    1,807
    Rep Power
    7

    Default

    Yo, I just switched to early morning work-outs. How do I stop from feeling like throwing up after work-outs??? don't wanna throw up. its not a good look for me

  11. #86
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Originally Posted by SLY1984
    Yo, I just switched to early morning work-outs. How do I stop from feeling like throwing up after work-outs??? don't wanna throw up. its not a good look for me
    Gotta stay hydrated and well nutrition...and warm up for 10 minutes.

    Can't run a car at its fastest in the cold without fuel and warming it up.

  12. #87
    Super Moderator RunningJumper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,971
    Rep Power
    14

    Default

    Getting trained by metro in person would be EPIC.

    Perhaps I'll take up your training sessions in the summer.

  13. #88
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    Defenders of stationary equipment argue that machines are designed to limit what you can do wrong. But seated machines often put heavier loads on the back and joints than is necessary, and almost always miss the mark when it comes to replicating the movements found in everyday life, according to Ultimate Back Performance and Fitness, by Stuart McGill, PhD, a professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario. For this list of exercises, we consulted McGill; Nicholas DiNubile, MD, author of FrameWork: Your 7-Step Program for Healthy Muscles, Bones, and Joints; and trainer Vern Gambetta, author of Athletic Development: The Art & Science of Functional Sports Conditioning.

    1 Seated Leg Extension
    What itís supposed to do: Train the quadriceps
    What it actually does: It strengthens a motion your legs arenít actually designed to do, and can put undue strain on the ligaments and tendons surrounding the kneecaps.
    A better exercise: One-legged body-weight squats. Lift one leg up and bend the opposite knee, dipping as far as you can, with control, while flexing at the hip, knee, and ankle. Use a rail for support until you develop requisite leg strength and balance. Aim for five to 10 reps on each leg. (If you are susceptible to knee pain, do the Bulgarian split squat instead, resting the top of one foot on a bench positioned two to three feet behind you. Descend until your thigh is parallel to the ground and then stand back up. Do five to 10 reps per leg.)

    2 Seated Military Press What itís supposed to do: Train shoulders and triceps
    What it actually does: Overhead pressing can put shoulder joints in vulnerable biomechanical positions. It puts undue stress on the shoulders, and the movement doesnít let you use your hips to assist your shoulders, which is the natural way to push something overhead.
    A better exercise: Medicine-ball throws. Stand three feet from a concrete wall; bounce a rubber medicine ball off a spot on the wall four feet above your head, squatting to catch the ball and rising to throw it upward in one continuous motion. Aim for 15 to 20 reps. Alternative: Standing alternate dumbbell presses. As you push the right dumbbell overhead, shift the right hip forward. Switch to the left side.

    3 Seated Lat Pull-Down (Behind the Neck) What itís supposed to do: Train lats, upper back, and biceps
    What it actually does: Unless you have very flexible shoulders, itís difficult to do correctly, so it can cause pinching in the shoulder joint and damage the rotator cuff.
    A better exercise: Incline pull-ups. Place a bar in the squat rack at waist height, grab the bar with both hands, and hang from the bar with your feet stretched out in front of you. Keep your torso stiff, and pull your chest to the bar 10 to 15 times. To make it harder, lower the bar; to make it easier, raise the bar.

    4 Seated Pec Deck What itís supposed to do: Train chest and shoulders
    What it actually does: It can put the shoulder in an unstable position and place excessive stress on the shoulder joint and its connective tissue.
    A better exercise: Incline push-ups. Aim for 15 to 20 reps. If this is too easy, progress to regular push-ups and plyometric push-ups (where you push up with enough force that your hands come off the ground), and aim for five to eight reps.

    5 Seated Hip-Abductor Machine What itís supposed to do: Train outer thighs
    What it actually does: Because you are seated, it trains a movement that has no functional use. If done with excessive weight and jerky technique, it can put undue pressure on the spine.
    A better exercise: Place a heavy, short, looped resistance band around your legs (at your ankles); sidestep out 20 paces and back with control. This is much harder than it sounds.

    6 Seated Rotation Machine What itís supposed to do: Train abdominals and obliques
    What it actually does: Because the pelvis doesnít move with the chest, this exercise can put excessive twisting forces on the spine.
    A better exercise: Do the cable wood chop, letting your heels turn freely with your torso. Aim for 10 to 12 reps

    7 Seated Leg Press What itís supposed to do: Train quadriceps, glutes,
    and hamstrings
    What it actually does: It often forces the spine to flex without engaging any of the necessary stabilization muscles of the hips, glutes, shoulders, and lower back.
    A better exercise: Body-weight squats. Focus on descending with control as far as you can without rounding your lower back. Aim for 15 to 20 for a set and increase sets as you develop strength.

    8 Squats Using Smith Machine What itís supposed to do: Train chest, biceps, and legs
    What it actually does: The alignment of the machineóthe bar is attached to a vertical sliding trackómakes for linear, not natural, arched movements. This puts stress on the knees, shoulders, and lower back.
    A better exercise: Body-weight squats. See ďSeated Leg Press.Ē

    9 Roman Chair Back Extension What itís supposed to do: Train spinal erectors
    What it actually does: Repeatedly flexing the back while itís supporting weight places pressure on the spine and increases the risk of damaging your disks.
    A better exercise: The bird-dog. Crouch on all fours, extend your right arm forward, and extend left leg backward. Do 10 seven-second reps, and then switch to the opposite side.

    10 Roman Chair Sit-up What itís supposed to do: Train abdominals and hip flexors
    What it actually does: The crunching motion can put undue stress on the lower back when it is in a vulnerable rounded position.
    A better exercise: The plank. Lie facedown on the floor. Prop up on your forearms, palms down. Rise up on your toes. Keep your back flat and contract your glutes, abdominals, and lats to keep your butt from sticking up. Hold this pose for 20 to 60 seconds.
    Push ups
    Pull ups/Chins
    Dips...

    but

    Nothing wrong with leg press. And the thigh abductor/adductor machine can be really good for rehabilitation.
    it's unrealistic to expect people who currently do workout, to just enter a gym and start squatting, deadlifting, etc etc. The machines seem much less intimidating, which is why so many people stick to them. And something is better than nothing...


    People who normally do machines are on Exercise Autopilot
    They do the same thing each and every time you exercise. Same machines, same pace, same duration. Whilethe routine sure feels comfortable, the results have long since halted.
    A plateau occurs when your body adapts to your routine and weight loss stops.

  14. #89
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Little note on my nutrition blog on FB.

    Most diets arenít about action; theyíre about thoughts.
    You spend mad time thinking about not having food.
    Either you follow your diet or you donít. Itís all or nothing.

    If only you had the willpower to step away from the mayonnaise. If only you could stop after four Pringles. If only you had the power, the strength, the discipline, the cojones, the energy, the drive, the motivation to control your waist, then youíd finally have the body you want. Youíve placed all the responsibility for dietary success or failure on your little 3-pound brain.

    But you canít defeat nature.
    Truth is, your body is built for eating. Itís full of hormones and neurotransmitters whose jobs roughly translate into "pass the pound cake."

    example:
    Overeating is like drug addiction. Studies show that obese people have reward centers in their brain similar to the reward centers of drug addicts.
    Stress eating is cyclical. When you eat to reduce stress, you activate the reward centers of your brain. When the feel-good effects wear off, you reach again for the thing that made you feel relaxed: food.
    Heavy people respond differently to certain foods. For example, in heavy people, the parietal region of the brain -- the control center for the tongue, lips, and mouth -- is activated by sugar. In skinny people, it isnít.

    To expect that your will or your fortitude can override chemical messages like these is the equivalent of seeing my ex override being an attention whore.

    To get on the road to waist management and stay there, you have to first strip away the guilt that comes with eating, the guilt that comes with diets, and the guilt that comes with occasionally enjoying foods that arenít at the platinum level on healthy-eating charts.

    And you have to start listening to your body and responding intelligently to your cravings and your emotions. You have to train your brain to stop obsessing about eating right.

    Over time, youíll learn what your body is saying and why, and youíll learn how to eat right to manage those cravings. Because the unrecognized truth about dieting is that when you stop overthinking, youíll stop overeating.
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

  15. #90
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    19
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    wow, very helpful info - especially to someone like me trying to get into better shape.

Similar Threads

  1. The Diet Thread
    By RunningJumper in forum Hangout
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: May 01, 2013, 09:59
  2. Official Strength Training Thread
    By orangeblobman in forum Hangout
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Aug 18, 2012, 18:55
  3. Replies: 28
    Last Post: May 12, 2010, 11:50

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •