View Poll Results: What to do with Lin?

Voters
56. You may not vote on this poll
  • Let him walk

    16 28.57%
  • Resign him and keep him long term

    27 48.21%
  • Resign him and trade him January 2013 with Amare

    13 23.21%
Page 15 of 140 FirstFirst ... 9101112131415161718192021354565 ... LastLast
Results 211 to 225 of 2090

Thread: Jeremy Lin

  1. #211
    Nein, Mann! Weissenberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rotterdam
    Posts
    3,071
    Rep Power
    15

    Default

    Originally Posted by tiger0330
    Funny s**t about Tyson not knowing JLin could throw down a tomahawk. Dude should have saved it for a home game, a lot of sodas, nachos and popcorn would hit the floor.

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
    No kidding, I was staring at the TV with my mouth open for at least a minute after he dunked it... seriously, in his first game he looked very unsure but last night he played like a combo of Nash and Rose...

  2. #212
    Veteran LJ4ptplay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ft. Collins, CO
    Posts
    2,950
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    Don't get me wrong, I like Lin and he shows how important a decent PG is to this team (still think we should trade Melo for DWill) but lets not get crazy here. NJ and Wash are not very good teams. Utah is good defensively and when they began trapping Lin, he turned the ball over frequently with 8 turnovers total.

    I'm sure Mike Brown will have the Lakers trap Lin on a consistent basis. This will be a good litmus test to see what we actually have in Lin (starting caliber PG that can lead this team or solid backup PG that can keep the system flowing when the starting PG sits on the bench).

    Note: Not being a hater. I love what Lin has been doing. Just trying to bring a balanced and fair critique.

  3. #213
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1,680
    Rep Power
    7

    Default

    Originally Posted by LJ4ptplay
    Don't get me wrong, I like Lin and he shows how important a decent PG is to this team (still think we should trade Melo for DWill) but lets not get crazy here. NJ and Wash are not very good teams. Utah is good defensively and when they began trapping Lin, he turned the ball over frequently with 8 turnovers total.

    I'm sure Mike Brown will have the Lakers trap Lin on a consistent basis. This will be a good litmus test to see what we actually have in Lin (starting caliber PG that can lead this team or solid backup PG that can keep the system flowing when the starting PG sits on the bench).

    Note: Not being a hater. I love what Lin has been doing. Just trying to bring a balanced and fair critique.
    His TO's in the Utah game were caused by fatigue not the trap.

    At this point I would never trade Melo for Williams. We possibly have a PG of the future why mess with it. Trade Melo for something if he does not Gel with the team but not a PG. Lets see how LIN continues...

    I think as soon as Melo gets back and LIN does not need to play 40 minutes things will just get better....Knicks will be a tough team to play defense on...

  4. #214
    Member BachaCho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    283
    Rep Power
    3

    Default

    Originally Posted by LJ4ptplay
    Don't get me wrong, I like Lin and he shows how important a decent PG is to this team (still think we should trade Melo for DWill) but lets not get crazy here. NJ and Wash are not very good teams. Utah is good defensively and when they began trapping Lin, he turned the ball over frequently with 8 turnovers total.

    I'm sure Mike Brown will have the Lakers trap Lin on a consistent basis. This will be a good litmus test to see what we actually have in Lin (starting caliber PG that can lead this team or solid backup PG that can keep the system flowing when the starting PG sits on the bench).

    Note: Not being a hater. I love what Lin has been doing. Just trying to bring a balanced and fair critique.
    Yeah they double teamed him when he was completely exhausted and all his turnovers where in the 2nd half

  5. #215
    El Cacique portega1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    River Rocks, Port Rich (Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico PUNETA!!!)
    Posts
    1,611
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    Originally Posted by LJ4ptplay
    Don't get me wrong, I like Lin and he shows how important a decent PG is to this team (still think we should trade Melo for DWill) but lets not get crazy here. NJ and Wash are not very good teams. Utah is good defensively and when they began trapping Lin, he turned the ball over frequently with 8 turnovers total.

    I'm sure Mike Brown will have the Lakers trap Lin on a consistent basis. This will be a good litmus test to see what we actually have in Lin (starting caliber PG that can lead this team or solid backup PG that can keep the system flowing when the starting PG sits on the bench).

    Note: Not being a hater. I love what Lin has been doing. Just trying to bring a balanced and fair critique.
    Cosign LJ

    On one hand, I'm drinking every ounce of this juice and really enjoying what we have seen the past three games.

    And, we have to recognize that DWill, Harris and Wall are no scrubs to go up against. But those teams have been beatable this year.

    So, I also want to see how Lin rolls against the top tier teams before we go believing he's an MVP, like some are saying around this forum.

    Lakers is a definite test. They have been working very hard on improving their pick and roll defense, and if Lin and the bunch succeed against them tomorrow without Stat and Melo, then he is definitely on his way to lead a turnaround for this franchise.

    But even then, as the league takes notice of his strengths and weaknesses, he will become more a focal point of game plans and scouting reports.

    Nonetheless, can't help believe this guy will be able to overcome everything thrown his way... there's just something special about him.

    Apologies if I seem ambiguous on what the future holds here. But it is my nature to make sure there are seatbelts on the bandwagon before I jump on it while I run alongside it enjoying the view.

  6. #216
    Member BachaCho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    283
    Rep Power
    3

    Default

    Originally Posted by mafra
    The crossover is impossible to defend against when you dribble that low to the ground. You lean, you're beaten.

    Wait until Amar'e gets back. Pick-&-roll with the game's best finisher. Take that away, and there's the alley-oops option to Tyson. Gaurd both bigs, Lin takes it to the cup. Somehow defend all that, then how do you guard the 3-point shot, or stop the kickout to the league's best ISO player?

    I think MDA cooked up Lin in the lab, sold his soul t save his job.

    What Lin also does well is attack the bigs during the pick-n-roll. Exactly what you're supposed to do.
    Exactly but Lin is playing so much minutes a night I hope he doesnt get burnt out but be is our only option right now for PG at this rate he will be burnt out, BD cant come back soon enough but he gets elbow infections and ****

  7. #217
    El Cacique portega1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    River Rocks, Port Rich (Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico PUNETA!!!)
    Posts
    1,611
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    Very nice scouting report on Lin:

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    Jeremy Lin Scouting Report: Explaining His Early, Surprising Success
    By Mike Prada - NBA Contributor

    Why is Jeremy Lin having so much success for the New York Knicks? We break down his game.
    Follow @sbnation on Twitter, and Like SBNation.com on Facebook.

    Feb 9, 2012 - WASHINGTON -- A three-game sample isn't large enough to tell if Jeremy Lin is indeed one of the best point guards in the NBA. A three-game sample against the New Jersey Nets, Utah Jazz and Washington Wizards certainly isn't enough to make bold declarations about Lin's game. But a three-game sample is enough to point out that Lin's not playing this well by accident.

    On Wednesday, the New York Knicks' undrafted sensation did to the Wizards what he did to the Nets and Jazz, ruining their pick-and-roll coverages to the tune of 23 points and 10 assists. Lin beat the Wizards in so many ways. When they left Tyson Chandler, he found him down the lane for dunks. When they covered Chandler, he found Steve Novak and Landry Fields for three pointers. When they did all that, he just beat the Wizards himself with twisting layups in the lane. All the while, the Wizards looked shocked, with John Wall's wide-eyed look early in the fourth quarter telling the whole story.

    "This game was really about containment. We couldn't contain the basketball, basically, I thought, all night long," Wizards coach Randy Wittman said after the game. But why is a point guard who was undrafted coming out of Harvard so impossible to contain in the pick and roll?

    There are many reasons:

    He stays low to the ground on his dribble

    The word many opponents have used to define Lin is "quick." Put Lin in a footrace with Wall, and Lin will get smoked. But because Lin is able to change speeds so well, he's able to be incredibly effective in the pick-and-roll. This much I knew coming into Wednesday.

    But why is Lin so quick? I think it comes down to his technique with the dribble. As Wittman noted before the game, Lin is pretty big for a point guard. At 6'3'', he can see over the defense, Wittman said, and that makes him tough. But while Lin is certainly close to as tall as Wall, he plays much shorter.

    Look at how low Lin is when coming off a pick and roll as compared to Wall.






    In that second shot especially, Lin's at basically a 55-degree angle to the ground, whereas Wall is at something like an 80-degree angle.

    What's the effect of being low to the ground? Changing speeds becomes easier. When Lin wants to accelerate, he can disguise it much easier because he's already so low. Also, he has less ground to cover with his dribble because there's less distance between his arm and the floor. On the other hand, when Wall wants to change speeds, he tends to sit up, then sit back down before driving. In a league where every split second matters, that can often be a wasted motion. Lin has no wasted motions because he's already so low to the ground.

    He speeds into the pick, then slows down to maintain the advantage

    Lin's approach to pick and rolls is actually somewhat counter-intuitive. Most great point guards go slower into the pick to make sure they rub shoulder-to-shoulder with the screener, then accelerate once they see the advantage. Lin often does the opposite. He runs faster into the pick, then slows down to put the primary defender on his back and maintain the advantage. It's very Chris Paul-ian, and it allows him that extra split second needed to pick the best course of action once the advantage is secured.

    "He is coming off with so much thrust and momentum," Wizards forward Maurice Evans said after the game. "if you got a decision to make, it’s either Tyson Chandler for a dunk or Steve Novak for a three-pointer."

    One of the reasons most point guards don't speed into screens like this is that it requires a lot of coordination that's hard to teach. They have to time their moves perfectly, because otherwise, their screener will be called for an offensive foul. Lin has great timing on his moves, which is one of his major strengths.

    He knows exactly what spot he needs to get to on the floor

    Before the game, Wittman talked about the need to force Lin away from his sweet spot on the floor. Wittman didn't specify what that sweet spot was, but from watching the game, it's clear that spot is on the right elbow. Let's just say the Wizards didn't prevent Lin from getting to that spot.

    Once Lin gets to the right elbow, he can finish with his right hand, find a shooter or find Chandler cutting down the rim. The right elbow is key, because Lin is not an especially good finisher with his left hand. But because he's so crafty, Lin can compensate for his weaknesses and get to where he wants to go no matter what the defense may throw at him.

    "We put them through maybe 100 pick and rolls," Lin said. "They changed coverages, and we just kept attacking. It's something different every time because the coverages will change."

    The Knicks also were smart to mix up the side in which the high pick and roll was set, which allows Lin to occasionally start left, then cross over to get to his right.

    He uses his existing infrastructure very well

    One of the biggest things that trips up young point guards is that they don't use their screener well enough. They often start their move too early before the big man is set, and they also veer far too wide, allowing their primary defender to fight over the screen. That's not a problem for Lin. When he comes off a screen, he's very close to his screener, making it very hard for his primary defender to come over the top.

    "He understands what I'm trying to accomplish out there," Tyson Chandler said when I asked him after the game. "In the pick and roll, it's all about creating an advantage. When you set a pick on a guard, you're going to knock him off, and now, the advantage is attacking the big and making somebody else that. He does it, and whenever he does it, he finds the right guy."

    The idea of creating an advantage is such a simple concept, but many young point guards don't think of it in those terms. Lin does, and it's a huge key to his success.

    (Worth noting: Chandler is one of the best screen-setters in the league. That certainly makes Lin's life a lot easier).

    He finishes really well going right

    Lin's not the best leaper in the world, but he's very crafty finishing around the rim with his right hand. The Wizards often let JaVale McGee hang back on their coverages, thinking he could intimidate Lin at the rim, but it didn't work. Lin has great body control in the air, jumping out towards the shot-blocker instead of jumping straight up. In doing so, he's able to take away the shot-blocker's advantage.

    Things to improve:

    Lin's certainly not perfect, and he won't keep playing this well once the league starts to figure him out. Here are some potential weaknesses he needs to fix:

    His jump shot: Eventually, teams will start to go underneath ball screens and dare him to make the outside jumper. This is what teams do to Wall, and it's why he hasn't be as effective this season. This was the one weakness Knicks coach Mike D'Antoni specifically pointed out, though he thinks Lin can overcome it. "I think when he gets an unbelievable outside shot -- and he can, his shot's not broken at all -- that'll open up other possibilities," D'Antoni said before the game.

    Finishing with his left hand: As noted above, Lin's not a very good finisher going left. While he can compensate for that with his quickness, there will be some teams that will cut off his right hand. NBA Playbook has more on this weakness.

    Adjusting when teams trap him: It has to be noted that the Nets, Jazz and Wizards are three teams that lack mobile big men that can jump out and divert Lin's path away from the basket. Better defensive teams like the Chicago Bulls, Boston Celtics and many more will cut off Lin's angle to the right elbow far better than the Wizards, Jazz and Nets. When that happens, Lin will need to change his game a bit. Some ways to do that include crossing over back to the left or quickly rotating the ball to another perimeter player to try to catch the weakside defenders napping as the trapping big man rushes back to his man.

    Nevertheless, the last three games show that Lin can certainly be a starting point guard in the NBA. He has room to grow, but as D'Antoni said after the game, he has all the tools needed to succeed.

    "I think it's for real," D'Antoni said. "The things that are for real are his vision, which won't change, his speed, which won't change, and his knowledge of the game, which won't change."

    There will be peaks and valleys. There will be stretches where Lin struggles as he searches for ways to adjust to other team's coverages. But as long as he has those three elements to his game, he will be successful in this league.

  8. #218
    Veteran petescud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,822
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Yeah, the better teams he won't have big games against them. But even the elite PG's struggle against the elite teams for the most part. Lin definitely has his work cut out for him, but at 23-ish, he'll have a good mentor in Barron Davis. Can you imagine what steve Nash could teach this kid

  9. #219
    TYPE-A Red's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,308
    Rep Power
    15

    Default

    I've seen him finish with the left a couple times.

    As long as he keeps playing defense like he is and dishing we will be good. We don't need him to score.

  10. #220
    12th man
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Far far away from the orgy that consist of clyde, 8's, rady, smokes and rono
    Posts
    11,260
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Originally Posted by portega1968
    Very nice scouting report on Lin:

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    Jeremy Lin Scouting Report: Explaining His Early, Surprising Success
    By Mike Prada - NBA Contributor

    Why is Jeremy Lin having so much success for the New York Knicks? We break down his game.
    Follow @sbnation on Twitter, and Like SBNation.com on Facebook.

    Feb 9, 2012 - WASHINGTON -- A three-game sample isn't large enough to tell if Jeremy Lin is indeed one of the best point guards in the NBA. A three-game sample against the New Jersey Nets, Utah Jazz and Washington Wizards certainly isn't enough to make bold declarations about Lin's game. But a three-game sample is enough to point out that Lin's not playing this well by accident.

    On Wednesday, the New York Knicks' undrafted sensation did to the Wizards what he did to the Nets and Jazz, ruining their pick-and-roll coverages to the tune of 23 points and 10 assists. Lin beat the Wizards in so many ways. When they left Tyson Chandler, he found him down the lane for dunks. When they covered Chandler, he found Steve Novak and Landry Fields for three pointers. When they did all that, he just beat the Wizards himself with twisting layups in the lane. All the while, the Wizards looked shocked, with John Wall's wide-eyed look early in the fourth quarter telling the whole story.

    "This game was really about containment. We couldn't contain the basketball, basically, I thought, all night long," Wizards coach Randy Wittman said after the game. But why is a point guard who was undrafted coming out of Harvard so impossible to contain in the pick and roll?

    There are many reasons:

    He stays low to the ground on his dribble

    The word many opponents have used to define Lin is "quick." Put Lin in a footrace with Wall, and Lin will get smoked. But because Lin is able to change speeds so well, he's able to be incredibly effective in the pick-and-roll. This much I knew coming into Wednesday.

    But why is Lin so quick? I think it comes down to his technique with the dribble. As Wittman noted before the game, Lin is pretty big for a point guard. At 6'3'', he can see over the defense, Wittman said, and that makes him tough. But while Lin is certainly close to as tall as Wall, he plays much shorter.

    Look at how low Lin is when coming off a pick and roll as compared to Wall.






    In that second shot especially, Lin's at basically a 55-degree angle to the ground, whereas Wall is at something like an 80-degree angle.

    What's the effect of being low to the ground? Changing speeds becomes easier. When Lin wants to accelerate, he can disguise it much easier because he's already so low. Also, he has less ground to cover with his dribble because there's less distance between his arm and the floor. On the other hand, when Wall wants to change speeds, he tends to sit up, then sit back down before driving. In a league where every split second matters, that can often be a wasted motion. Lin has no wasted motions because he's already so low to the ground.

    He speeds into the pick, then slows down to maintain the advantage

    Lin's approach to pick and rolls is actually somewhat counter-intuitive. Most great point guards go slower into the pick to make sure they rub shoulder-to-shoulder with the screener, then accelerate once they see the advantage. Lin often does the opposite. He runs faster into the pick, then slows down to put the primary defender on his back and maintain the advantage. It's very Chris Paul-ian, and it allows him that extra split second needed to pick the best course of action once the advantage is secured.

    "He is coming off with so much thrust and momentum," Wizards forward Maurice Evans said after the game. "if you got a decision to make, itís either Tyson Chandler for a dunk or Steve Novak for a three-pointer."

    One of the reasons most point guards don't speed into screens like this is that it requires a lot of coordination that's hard to teach. They have to time their moves perfectly, because otherwise, their screener will be called for an offensive foul. Lin has great timing on his moves, which is one of his major strengths.

    He knows exactly what spot he needs to get to on the floor

    Before the game, Wittman talked about the need to force Lin away from his sweet spot on the floor. Wittman didn't specify what that sweet spot was, but from watching the game, it's clear that spot is on the right elbow. Let's just say the Wizards didn't prevent Lin from getting to that spot.

    Once Lin gets to the right elbow, he can finish with his right hand, find a shooter or find Chandler cutting down the rim. The right elbow is key, because Lin is not an especially good finisher with his left hand. But because he's so crafty, Lin can compensate for his weaknesses and get to where he wants to go no matter what the defense may throw at him.

    "We put them through maybe 100 pick and rolls," Lin said. "They changed coverages, and we just kept attacking. It's something different every time because the coverages will change."

    The Knicks also were smart to mix up the side in which the high pick and roll was set, which allows Lin to occasionally start left, then cross over to get to his right.

    He uses his existing infrastructure very well

    One of the biggest things that trips up young point guards is that they don't use their screener well enough. They often start their move too early before the big man is set, and they also veer far too wide, allowing their primary defender to fight over the screen. That's not a problem for Lin. When he comes off a screen, he's very close to his screener, making it very hard for his primary defender to come over the top.

    "He understands what I'm trying to accomplish out there," Tyson Chandler said when I asked him after the game. "In the pick and roll, it's all about creating an advantage. When you set a pick on a guard, you're going to knock him off, and now, the advantage is attacking the big and making somebody else that. He does it, and whenever he does it, he finds the right guy."

    The idea of creating an advantage is such a simple concept, but many young point guards don't think of it in those terms. Lin does, and it's a huge key to his success.

    (Worth noting: Chandler is one of the best screen-setters in the league. That certainly makes Lin's life a lot easier).

    He finishes really well going right

    Lin's not the best leaper in the world, but he's very crafty finishing around the rim with his right hand. The Wizards often let JaVale McGee hang back on their coverages, thinking he could intimidate Lin at the rim, but it didn't work. Lin has great body control in the air, jumping out towards the shot-blocker instead of jumping straight up. In doing so, he's able to take away the shot-blocker's advantage.

    Things to improve:

    Lin's certainly not perfect, and he won't keep playing this well once the league starts to figure him out. Here are some potential weaknesses he needs to fix:

    His jump shot: Eventually, teams will start to go underneath ball screens and dare him to make the outside jumper. This is what teams do to Wall, and it's why he hasn't be as effective this season. This was the one weakness Knicks coach Mike D'Antoni specifically pointed out, though he thinks Lin can overcome it. "I think when he gets an unbelievable outside shot -- and he can, his shot's not broken at all -- that'll open up other possibilities," D'Antoni said before the game.

    Finishing with his left hand: As noted above, Lin's not a very good finisher going left. While he can compensate for that with his quickness, there will be some teams that will cut off his right hand. NBA Playbook has more on this weakness.

    Adjusting when teams trap him: It has to be noted that the Nets, Jazz and Wizards are three teams that lack mobile big men that can jump out and divert Lin's path away from the basket. Better defensive teams like the Chicago Bulls, Boston Celtics and many more will cut off Lin's angle to the right elbow far better than the Wizards, Jazz and Nets. When that happens, Lin will need to change his game a bit. Some ways to do that include crossing over back to the left or quickly rotating the ball to another perimeter player to try to catch the weakside defenders napping as the trapping big man rushes back to his man.

    Nevertheless, the last three games show that Lin can certainly be a starting point guard in the NBA. He has room to grow, but as D'Antoni said after the game, he has all the tools needed to succeed.

    "I think it's for real," D'Antoni said. "The things that are for real are his vision, which won't change, his speed, which won't change, and his knowledge of the game, which won't change."

    There will be peaks and valleys. There will be stretches where Lin struggles as he searches for ways to adjust to other team's coverages. But as long as he has those three elements to his game, he will be successful in this league.
    great post.

  11. #221
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,814
    Rep Power
    15

    Default

    The Lakers will be a test for sure, I want to see how Lin reacts to the double teams and traps I expect the Lakers to throw at him. Lin now has the target on his back that Melo and Amare had as option #1 in LA, let's see if he can minimize his TOs and get the team points by exploiting the doubles.

    This kid has given me a case of Linsanity, been a member here since 2005 and never once had an avatar and now I am working on a Lin sig.

  12. #222
    Nein, Mann! Weissenberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rotterdam
    Posts
    3,071
    Rep Power
    15

    Default

    However, you can clearly see a lot of improvement after every game. Lin gains his confidence and experience every minute he plays and I'm sure he'll add some new moves to his repertoire every time the opposite team will adjust to his standard game. Besides, our team can be so universal that it will be always tough for the opponent's defense to figure out who's going to cause the major threat on which possession.

  13. #223
    El Cacique portega1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    River Rocks, Port Rich (Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico PUNETA!!!)
    Posts
    1,611
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    What happened on Tuesday, December 27, 2011?

    * Powerful quake hits Siberia
    * Italy fines Apple $1.2million
    * Somali pirates hijack another tanker
    * Egypt stop virginity tests on female detainees (yeah right)
    * Residents in panic as Indonesia's Mount Lokon erupts
    * Military coup foiled in Guinea Bissau

    AND....

    * Jeremy Lin was claimed off waivers by the New York Knicks!!!

    Who would've thought that Dec. 27, 2011 would become one of the most blessed days in Knickerbocker history?

    A quick look back at what was said after this historic event!!!

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    Knicks claim guard Jeremy Lin
    By Marc Stein
    ESPN.com

    The New York Knicks have claimed guard Jeremy Lin off waivers to fill a void at backup point guard.

    Lin was released Sunday by the Rockets to make roster room for Houston's signing of Samuel Dalembert.

    The Rockets had claimed Lin off waivers after he was released by the Golden State Warriors, who had to let him go to create the requisite salary-cap space for a four-year offer sheet worth nearly $43 million to then-restricted DeAndre Jordan that was matched by the Los Angeles Clippers.

    Lin is a Bay Area native who played in 29 games last season as a rookie with the Warriors, becoming the NBA's first Asian-American player since 1947.

    The Knicks, who last week claimed sharpshooter Steve Novak off waivers, needed another guard after rookie Iman Shumpert suffered a knee injury in New York's Christmas Day win over Boston. New York is also still waiting for recently signed point guard Baron Davis to recover from a back injury in order to thrust him into the starting lineup.

    "He can really get in the lane and distribute the basketball," Knicks coach Mike D'Antoni said of Lin on Tuesday. "We haven't seen him for a couple of years, but when we worked him out, we liked him. We'll see."

    Lin will join the Knicks in the Bay Area on Wednesday prior to their game against Golden State. Reserve point guard Mike Bibby is expected to return from a back injury on Wednesday against the Warriors.

    The ailment sidelined Bibby for the Knicks' season-opening win over Boston on Sunday. If Bibby is healthy enough to play, Lin, a former standout at Harvard University, will serve as the Knicks' third point guard. Toney Douglas is the starting point guard for the Knicks.

    "If someone wakes up with a cold, he's playing a lot. If not, then we'll see," said D'Antoni, who quipped that Lin "might be the smartest guy we have."

    Just how long the Knicks plan to keep Lin is unclear. His contract is not guaranteed, so the Knicks can waive him at any time prior to Feb. 10 without having to pay the remainder of his contract. If and when Shumpert returns from his injury, he will likely resume his role as one of the team's three point guards, leaving Lin as the odd man out.

    Lin's addition gives the Knicks 15 players on their roster. They still have the $2.5 million "room" exception available to acquire a free agent. If they choose to add another player, they would need to free up a roster spot.

    "Jeremy's just looking for an opportunity to show what he can do," his agent Roger Montgomery said on Tuesday. " And, what better place to do so, than on the biggest stage in basketball?"

    __________________________________________________ ___

    Bringing on Bibby, Douglas sucking, Shump hurt, Rockets going after Dalembert, Billups amnestied, Kmart committing to the Clips last week.. the list can be endless!!! But one thing is always proven in the end... Life takes unknown paths to reach it's destiny

  14. #224
    TYPE-A Red's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,308
    Rep Power
    15

    Default

    In order for Lin to really work our leaders must take the same approach with him as the Celtics did with Rondo.

    Our Broadway Bigs must continually tell Lin

    "This is your team, we'll go as far as you can take us"

    "You control the team"

    "We are your weapons at your disposal"

    I think Lin's chemistry with the 2nd unit is crucial. Once he gets time with STAT & Melo, he'll be even deadlier. It'll be pick your poison time.

    Defenses will back up while Lin penetrates, and the dish in the lane to Stat or the Mad Byson is unstoppable!

    Novak is another god send.

    On defense, if Lin can play D and stay in front of his man, we can compete with anyone. Everyone is saying it's the D'antoni system...

    I say it's obvious that when we look to score inside we can dominate. And that's something Lin brings as a fundamental, not because of the system. We are winning by playing fundamentally sound ball, no coincidence.

    We were disappointed to learn that Mike couldn't get umpteen guards to do this. With Lin we should never see 4o something threes a game. Never.

  15. #225
    TYPE-A Red's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,308
    Rep Power
    15

    Default

    WE'RE ALL-LIN!

    Last edited by Red; Feb 09, 2012 at 16:05.

Similar Threads

  1. Was Jeremy Lin At 100% While With the Knicks??
    By tkrieger in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Oct 01, 2012, 08:53
  2. Replies: 55
    Last Post: Sep 10, 2012, 14:05
  3. New York Knicks @ Toronto Raptors Tuesday 2/14 7:00PM
    By AmareForPresident in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 403
    Last Post: Feb 16, 2012, 02:07
  4. The Rise of Jeremy Lin
    By Cakalusa in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Feb 10, 2012, 17:17
  5. The Ups and Downs of the Jeremy Lin Experience
    By KBlack25 in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Feb 08, 2012, 12:50

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •