View Poll Results: What to do with Lin?

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  • Let him walk

    16 28.57%
  • Resign him and keep him long term

    27 48.21%
  • Resign him and trade him January 2013 with Amare

    13 23.21%
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Thread: Jeremy Lin

  1. #1276
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    Originally Posted by Crazy⑧s
    What if Lin were to break out again at approx $8M a year? We can only prognosticate, but I certainly wouldn't be shocked if he were to turn out a 15 and 10 PG.

    Would numbers close to that range afford him a little faith from you, RNYB?
    15 and 10 (on this team) we can get from Felton, Kidd and J.R., and at a discount price. Now Iím more worried about the dissention and type of chemistry Linís contract will bring if he doesnít play like Michael Jordan. MJ was making 15 mil a year and JLinís contribution comes nowhere near that. JLin and every one of his fans is building some tremendous pressure, will he be able to contain it? NO ONE knows! Heís a risk, an unnecessary one at that. I really donít understand this whole thingÖitís totally LinconceivableÖ

    To add... I wouldn't want to play or play any of my guys in the post season with a busted up knee....especially going into a contract year. The thought of re-injuring alone is enough for me to sit out. Some injuries you just don't rush, you are going to need your knees for more things in life other than playing BBall.

  2. #1277
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    Originally Posted by platnumn
    Add to that the fact that THE KNICKS THEMSELVES said they would hold Lin out unless they reached the 2nd round, and you really see how full of **** these reporters are.

    The Knicks were protecting their own investment and thinking long-term by not allowing Lin to play in the first round. If the Knicks made it to the 2nd round and Lin still didn't play, it would be cause for skepticism.

    ...but I don't understand how you criticize Lin for not playing in the playoffs at 85% WHEN IT WASN'T EVEN HIS DECISION IN THE FIRST PLACE!!!

    It's times like these that I hate the NBA news and all the misinformed commenters.
    Will put.
    It's the propaganda that management is throwing out to retarded fans. Fans that will listen to racist commentators like Steven A@@ Smith.

  3. #1278
    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
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    Breaking News "Stretch Provision" makes Lin staying in NY more likely

    From Larry Coon at ESPN....

    "Sources say Knicks GM Glen Grunwald was infuriated by the Rockets' manipulation of the rules. When Lin's offer sheet arrived at the team's offices in New York City, staffers insisted that it needed to go to Grunwald personally.

    But Grunwald wasn't in New York -- he was in Las Vegas attending the NBA Summer League. The same sources say Grunwald then dodged the delivery for a day and a half, finally accepting it on Saturday. Since league rules say the clock doesn't start on an offer sheet until it is received by the player's prior team, this gave the Knicks until Tuesday night to decide whether to keep Lin on the Knicks and accept the luxury-tax consequences.

    In the meantime the Knicks traded for Felton -- presumably as a replacement for Lin to pair with new signee Jason Kidd -- and let it be known that they have decided not to match Houston's offer.

    So are the Knicks serious, or is this just an outburst before they settle down, match the offer and bring Lin back to the Big Apple?

    Logic dictates that it's actually the latter.

    [+] Enlarge
    Howard Smith/US Presswire
    Lin's worth even more to the Knicks off the court than he is on.
    Sure, the prospect of paying a fortune in additional luxury tax has to make the Knicks stop and think. But Lin is a moneymaking machine. Lin puts people in seats, both at home and on the road, and he is a merchandising bonanza. The stock of Knicks parent company MSG is up 20 percent since Linsanity began, with Nate Silver of the New York Times reporting that MSG's market capitalization has gained $600 million since that fateful day last February when Lin took over as the Knicks' starting point guard.

    So what happens to MSG if the Knicks fail to retain Lin? Silver continued, saying, "as of late Monday morning, on the mere possibility that Lin might not be re-signed, MSG stock had lost about $50 million in market value." This was on a rumor -- imagine what the company's losses will be if losing Lin becomes a reality.

    So if Lin plays up to his potential, he should more than make up for what it costs the Knicks to keep him. But what if Lin doesn't pan out? What if his 26-game sample proves to be an illusion, and he ends up as yet another flash in the pan? Will the Knicks be stuck with an enormous tax bill for an unproductive player?

    If worse comes to worst, another new rule can help the team out. The "stretch provision" allows a team to waive a player and extend his salary payments over twice the number of remaining seasons, plus one. So if Lin is waived with one season remaining on his contract, he would be paid his salary over three years.

    Here's the important part -- teams also may elect to stretch a waived player's salary-cap hit over the same number of years. So if Lin proves to be a disaster over the next two seasons, the Knicks can waive him, stretch the payment of his $14.8 million salary over three years, and reduce his salary-cap amount to about $4.9 million in each season
    . This would reduce the team's tax bill significantly. If the Knicks are right at the tax line, a $4.9 million salary would translate to a $7.35 million tax bill. This is much more palatable.

    In sum, Lin will continue to be a financial bonanza if he keeps playing up to his potential. If he ends up being a bust, the Knicks have the means to mitigate the damage. The potential upside is well worth the risk.

    So logic dictates that sometime before midnight Tuesday night, the Knicks will inform the league that they are matching the Rockets' offer, and Jeremy Lin will remain a member of the Knicks.

    As much as keeping Lin will cost them, losing him will cost more."
    Last edited by Paul1355; Jul 17, 2012 at 13:42.

  4. #1279
    Veteran BIG APPLE SPORTS's Avatar
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    LOL nice moderating guys ^^^^

  5. #1280
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    Originally Posted by Paul1355
    From John Hollinger at ESPN....

    "Sources say Knicks GM Glen Grunwald was infuriated by the Rockets' manipulation of the rules. When Lin's offer sheet arrived at the team's offices in New York City, staffers insisted that it needed to go to Grunwald personally.

    But Grunwald wasn't in New York -- he was in Las Vegas attending the NBA Summer League. The same sources say Grunwald then dodged the delivery for a day and a half, finally accepting it on Saturday. Since league rules say the clock doesn't start on an offer sheet until it is received by the player's prior team, this gave the Knicks until Tuesday night to decide whether to keep Lin on the Knicks and accept the luxury-tax consequences.

    In the meantime the Knicks traded for Felton -- presumably as a replacement for Lin to pair with new signee Jason Kidd -- and let it be known that they have decided not to match Houston's offer.

    So are the Knicks serious, or is this just an outburst before they settle down, match the offer and bring Lin back to the Big Apple?

    Logic dictates that it's actually the latter.

    [+] Enlarge
    Howard Smith/US Presswire
    Lin's worth even more to the Knicks off the court than he is on.
    Sure, the prospect of paying a fortune in additional luxury tax has to make the Knicks stop and think. But Lin is a moneymaking machine. Lin puts people in seats, both at home and on the road, and he is a merchandising bonanza. The stock of Knicks parent company MSG is up 20 percent since Linsanity began, with Nate Silver of the New York Times reporting that MSG's market capitalization has gained $600 million since that fateful day last February when Lin took over as the Knicks' starting point guard.

    So what happens to MSG if the Knicks fail to retain Lin? Silver continued, saying, "as of late Monday morning, on the mere possibility that Lin might not be re-signed, MSG stock had lost about $50 million in market value." This was on a rumor -- imagine what the company's losses will be if losing Lin becomes a reality.

    So if Lin plays up to his potential, he should more than make up for what it costs the Knicks to keep him. But what if Lin doesn't pan out? What if his 26-game sample proves to be an illusion, and he ends up as yet another flash in the pan? Will the Knicks be stuck with an enormous tax bill for an unproductive player?

    If worse comes to worst, another new rule can help the team out. The "stretch provision" allows a team to waive a player and extend his salary payments over twice the number of remaining seasons, plus one. So if Lin is waived with one season remaining on his contract, he would be paid his salary over three years.

    Here's the important part -- teams also may elect to stretch a waived player's salary-cap hit over the same number of years. So if Lin proves to be a disaster over the next two seasons, the Knicks can waive him, stretch the payment of his $14.8 million salary over three years, and reduce his salary-cap amount to about $4.9 million in each season
    . This would reduce the team's tax bill significantly. If the Knicks are right at the tax line, a $4.9 million salary would translate to a $7.35 million tax bill. This is much more palatable.

    In sum, Lin will continue to be a financial bonanza if he keeps playing up to his potential. If he ends up being a bust, the Knicks have the means to mitigate the damage. The potential upside is well worth the risk.

    So logic dictates that sometime before midnight Tuesday night, the Knicks will inform the league that they are matching the Rockets' offer, and Jeremy Lin will remain a member of the Knicks.

    As much as keeping Lin will cost them, losing him will cost more."
    This post is brilliant. The new CBA was supposedly designed to make it so that dead weight players like Eddy Curry didn't completely kill teams' chances to keep themselves competitive, and that's an excellent provision. Is there are a limit to the number of times the Knicks can use that stretch provision? If they use it on Jeremy Lin in Year 3 of his contract all they gotta do is make sure they're 5 million under the cap in Year 4 and then they don't pay any luxury tax for his contract that year at all so it's not that big a deal.

    They can trade him, they can use this provision, or they can trade somebody else. Brilliant...only a complete idiot would refuse to match at this point.

  6. #1281
    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by SSj4Wingzero
    This post is brilliant. The new CBA was supposedly designed to make it so that dead weight players like Eddy Curry didn't completely kill teams' chances to keep themselves competitive, and that's an excellent provision. Is there are a limit to the number of times the Knicks can use that stretch provision? If they use it on Jeremy Lin in Year 3 of his contract all they gotta do is make sure they're 5 million under the cap in Year 4 and then they don't pay any luxury tax for his contract that year at all so it's not that big a deal.

    They can trade him, they can use this provision, or they can trade somebody else. Brilliant...only a complete idiot would refuse to match at this point.
    the stretch provision really blows away the argument that it is not worth paying Lin 14 mil in year 3....it gives us flexibility in case we can't trade him. Can I get a rep point for finding this? lol

  7. #1282
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    Originally Posted by Paul1355
    From John Hollinger at ESPN....

    "Sources say Knicks GM Glen Grunwald was infuriated by the Rockets' manipulation of the rules. When Lin's offer sheet arrived at the team's offices in New York City, staffers insisted that it needed to go to Grunwald personally.

    But Grunwald wasn't in New York -- he was in Las Vegas attending the NBA Summer League. The same sources say Grunwald then dodged the delivery for a day and a half, finally accepting it on Saturday. Since league rules say the clock doesn't start on an offer sheet until it is received by the player's prior team, this gave the Knicks until Tuesday night to decide whether to keep Lin on the Knicks and accept the luxury-tax consequences.

    In the meantime the Knicks traded for Felton -- presumably as a replacement for Lin to pair with new signee Jason Kidd -- and let it be known that they have decided not to match Houston's offer.

    So are the Knicks serious, or is this just an outburst before they settle down, match the offer and bring Lin back to the Big Apple?

    Logic dictates that it's actually the latter.

    [+] Enlarge
    Howard Smith/US Presswire
    Lin's worth even more to the Knicks off the court than he is on.
    Sure, the prospect of paying a fortune in additional luxury tax has to make the Knicks stop and think. But Lin is a moneymaking machine. Lin puts people in seats, both at home and on the road, and he is a merchandising bonanza. The stock of Knicks parent company MSG is up 20 percent since Linsanity began, with Nate Silver of the New York Times reporting that MSG's market capitalization has gained $600 million since that fateful day last February when Lin took over as the Knicks' starting point guard.

    So what happens to MSG if the Knicks fail to retain Lin? Silver continued, saying, "as of late Monday morning, on the mere possibility that Lin might not be re-signed, MSG stock had lost about $50 million in market value." This was on a rumor -- imagine what the company's losses will be if losing Lin becomes a reality.

    So if Lin plays up to his potential, he should more than make up for what it costs the Knicks to keep him. But what if Lin doesn't pan out? What if his 26-game sample proves to be an illusion, and he ends up as yet another flash in the pan? Will the Knicks be stuck with an enormous tax bill for an unproductive player?

    If worse comes to worst, another new rule can help the team out. The "stretch provision" allows a team to waive a player and extend his salary payments over twice the number of remaining seasons, plus one. So if Lin is waived with one season remaining on his contract, he would be paid his salary over three years.

    Here's the important part -- teams also may elect to stretch a waived player's salary-cap hit over the same number of years. So if Lin proves to be a disaster over the next two seasons, the Knicks can waive him, stretch the payment of his $14.8 million salary over three years, and reduce his salary-cap amount to about $4.9 million in each season
    . This would reduce the team's tax bill significantly. If the Knicks are right at the tax line, a $4.9 million salary would translate to a $7.35 million tax bill. This is much more palatable.

    In sum, Lin will continue to be a financial bonanza if he keeps playing up to his potential. If he ends up being a bust, the Knicks have the means to mitigate the damage. The potential upside is well worth the risk.

    So logic dictates that sometime before midnight Tuesday night, the Knicks will inform the league that they are matching the Rockets' offer, and Jeremy Lin will remain a member of the Knicks.

    As much as keeping Lin will cost them, losing him will cost more."

    Awesome info. Thanks for posting.

  8. #1283
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    Originally Posted by BillyHoyle
    Basically, Stephen A and Frank Isola have been tweeting and talking about how Lin is soft for not playing in the playoffs last season despite being, "85% healthy," and that this is one of the reasons the Knicks wouldn't match the offer.... Of course, neither of these guys has a medical degree and personally examined Lin or i guess understands how coming back from injury works...You can be "85%" and still not ready to play in an NBA game, for example, if you are still have instability making a lateral cut. Meniscus injuries don't heal fast (I have been around and seen many), but who cares, since it is a good story to run on and say he could have played but decided not, and apparently plenty of people (as exemplified by some posters on this board) will still believe you are credible.

    That's why that Q&A you posted may have been the first real good journalism that i've seen on this issue...Somebody actually bothered to read the CBA and remove some misinformation that is floating around.
    Your also missing the most important point of the Knicks FO told him to sit out because they didn't want jeremy risk re-injury and harm their cash cow

    "can you give 15 mins" -SAS SHM

  9. #1284
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    "If worse comes to worst, another new rule can help the team out. The "stretch provision" allows a team to waive a player and extend his salary payments over twice the number of remaining seasons, plus one. So if Lin is waived with one season remaining on his contract, he would be paid his salary over three years.

    Here's the important part -- teams also may elect to stretch a waived player's salary-cap hit over the same number of years. So if Lin proves to be a disaster over the next two seasons, the Knicks can waive him, stretch the payment of his $14.8 million salary over three years, and reduce his salary-cap amount to about $4.9 million in each season."

    Thanks for posting this, Paul. truly.

  10. #1285
    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Real NY Baller
    "If worse comes to worst, another new rule can help the team out. The "stretch provision" allows a team to waive a player and extend his salary payments over twice the number of remaining seasons, plus one. So if Lin is waived with one season remaining on his contract, he would be paid his salary over three years.

    Here's the important part -- teams also may elect to stretch a waived player's salary-cap hit over the same number of years. So if Lin proves to be a disaster over the next two seasons, the Knicks can waive him, stretch the payment of his $14.8 million salary over three years, and reduce his salary-cap amount to about $4.9 million in each season."

    Thanks for posting this, Paul. truly.
    your welcome brother, i guess it does pay off to have espn insider lol

    This makes the Lin investment worth it

  11. #1286
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    Originally Posted by Paul1355
    your welcome brother, i guess it does pay off to have espn insider lol

    This makes the Lin investment worth it
    And i gave you some rep love for finding the article

  12. #1287
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    Hollinger is correct. So is Nate Silver and countless others who have pointed out that a cost/benefit analysis favors keeping Lin.

    Does that really give anyone confidence Dolan will make the rational decision?

  13. #1288
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    Originally Posted by Paul1355
    the stretch provision really blows away the argument that it is not worth paying Lin 14 mil in year 3....it gives us flexibility in case we can't trade him. Can I get a rep point for finding this? lol
    Apparently I have to spread some around first, let me see what I can do

  14. #1289
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    Great article Paul. Looks like theres an ESPN insider article saying basically the same thing written by Larry Coon (no 'cism). With this new bit of information it would be really dumb not to re-sign him, I think i was overlooking the way we'd have road games and the road teams would be cheering for us, or mainly Lin. Same thing sorta, but I hope the Knicks wait until 11:58pm ET to sign that contract just to stick it to the houston C*cksh*ts

  15. #1290
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    If it isn't about the money based on the provision....
    Then what is it?

    The knee isn't healing right?
    Lin slept with Dolan's wife?
    Melo crying that this is a Lin town?
    Melo slept with Dolan's wife then lied to Dolan that it was Lin instead?

    WHAT IS IT!
    OH THE HORROR and SUSPENSE!

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