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Thread: Eating crow and loving it

  1. #61
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    Originally Posted by nuckles2k2
    Everything you said is cool, but I don't need Landry Fields thinking he's at Stanford, and he can go off against NBA players. You don't want him taking more than 7-9 shots a game. Steve Novak is a good player, in his own right, that's the issue tho...he's a pigeonholed, role player, he thrives off of other teammates' interior success, and game planning. If help doesn't have to come from his man, he's taken out of the game plan. Baron Davis is an older PG with injury woes, so when the team needs the ball pushed into the middle of the defense, he's just walking it up at a snail's pace.

    This is what Melo has had to work with the past two games.

    We need Shump to stick to the opposing team's best player/ball handler, so with his harassing style of play, it allows everyone else to stay at home on their man. I counted a couple of times, last night, where Fields was on LeBron, and Melo was sagging off of his man to give help. The ball was kicked to Melo's assignment, who then got his shot off (Chalmers a few times), same with JR and his man.

    I'm not saying the Knicks are in a position to win the series with Shump playing, but they most certainly have no shot without him. You don't want Fields guarding LBJ or Wade, 1-on-1...as a matter of fact, you can't have that. But you also can't help off of Chalmers, Miller, Battier, or Jones.

    See...when I start seeing (and hearing) people say things like "they have potentials to be discovered. They're NBA players. They need to believe. Theoretically, you need 6 guys to defend Miami's big three" I start getting royally pissed off. I don't mean to attack anyone, I don't wanna be THAT GUY, but none of that means anything.

    Every single player on the Knicks can believe with their heart of hearts that they can accomplish anything in the world...and if Baron Davis walks the basketball up the court, while Miami gets set 1 thru 5, on the defensive end...we're playing into their hands.

    If Baron walks it up, eats up 6-7 seconds doing so; keeps his dribble while looking around, Miami is denying Melo all the way out past the 3 point line, he finally gets the ball with about 13 seconds left on the clock, he's now standing at the free throw line extended (way out on the wing), he looks up, and he sees Novak blanketed, Tyson fronted, Baron on the other god damn side of the court -- opposite free throw line extended, and JR desperately trying to get away from Wade or Chalmers....what does Melo do? Is it selfish for him to try to get his own shot there? Where does he apply his truly unselfish mind, and go with the ball?

    And in scenarios where Melo is being fronted about 18 feet from the cup, why does Baron....after he expends the 6-7 seconds walking it up...why does he take another 2-3 seconds trying to make the perfect lob pass to Melo behind the man fronting him? Now once again, Melo finally gets the ball, 13-14 seconds on the shot clock, he's either blitzed with another defender, sent baseline so the help can meet him at the rim, or he faces up, and sees what I described in the previous paragraph.

    What is he to do?

    To avoid those situations, the team needs to get into it's offense quicker. I don't want to blame Baron, because he's trying. But if he's not gonna push in transition, then he needs to attack in the half court set a bit more....I counted Baron getting to the rim twice in the game yesterday. Once for a floater, and the other where he shook Miller. Conversely, Lin lived in the paint.

    These are the kind of things you need to look at, but people don't...then they approach me with "Oh man, Melo is so selfish dawg", and all I can think is:



    Alright.....rant over.....

    In case I hurt some feelings or whatever, it's nothing personal. I have people that I see everyday that says wild ****, so when I come on here and see some of the stuff said. I activate beast mode.
    No hard feelings! You've got your points.

    I know if I dig into the games, the analysis would look exactly like yours. That's why I deceided to leave the ball passing responsibility to high-paid Melo and wish for the right game plan and right players to execute it.

    Could you help me with the following quote? I mean can you explain why we can't be like that?
    The Sixers rarely run isolation plays, which is exactly the way they like it. According to Elton Brand, the more different players get to handle the ball, the better the team’s defenseis…

    Huh?


    "When you iso a lot you don't have that shared responsibility on defense. It's kind of human nature –if you work hard to get a guy a layup, he'll want to return the favor and play harder on defense," Brand explained.

    Brand, a two-time All-Star, was the focal point of the offense when he played for the Clippers and averaged upto 18 shots per game one season. Often, the offense filtered through him on the post, which Brand says didn't look like too much fun for his teammates. Truthbe told, he prefers the Sixers' style of offense.

    This season the Sixers had seven different players lead the team in scoring in the first 10 games.
    That's unpredicatable and acceptable to me. Or say ideal.

    I know it's easier said than done. So I'll keep listening to you guys.

    BTW, that "upgrade to pro today" icon is rather cute. Can't do it in one day though. Got to give me time.

  2. #62
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    Originally Posted by nuckles2k2
    How is that humble pie for Melo?
    Exactly because of the stats you just quoted. Over his whole career Melo has experienced time and again that he is good, but not good enough to put an entire team on his back and win it all. He had one year in which he seemed transformed after the Olympics. Unfortunately it didn't last. It seems he is too hedonistic and too stubborn to accept that.

    That's exactly what I mean: he played at the top of his game, overachieved by his own standards, yet it was not enough. That's humble pie for you, however it doesn't seem to affect Melo or his approach to playing basketball. If he killed our spacing by planing himself on the elbow and we got a playoff win, you wouldn't hear a word from me. But he simply cannot do that and he doesn't trust his team mates abilities.

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