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Thread: Injuries and NBA Athletic Trainers

  1. #1
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    Default Injuries and NBA Athletic Trainers

    I've been a trainer for 5 years and it could be NBA training staffs aren't as practical for long term stability with their training methods.

    Injuries are unfortunate events.. Everyone is bound to suffer from one, we cant avoid them 100%...but these trainers are incompetent.
    the NBA season is a grueling one, and the games require a lot of agility and movement where the joints are at risk. Body segments are linked into a kinetic link. If one part injured, the others are affected, as the balance between them is disturbed.

    I was the athletic trainer assistant and strength conditioning coach for Manhattan College for two semesters, only had one guy the IR during the entire time.

    We worked with efficient agility methods, not too much stretching (just P & F). Stretching too much could lead to injury. Plus it can hinder strength.

    Question is, what is the stabilization method of these trainers?

    Injuries like that make you wonder what he teams(training staffs) are thinking. They are risking the careers of the players when they cant keep them out of the game for long enough.. Or are they just incompetent?

    Now Rose, Shumpert, and formerly guys like Arenas, Carter, T'Mac...all first class talented guys...some of the most exciting athletes we've seen won't be the same players we've known them to be.

    Rose and Shumpert's careers will be highly impacted and you see them taking less drives and taking more jumpers when they come.

    Those injuries ruin your mentality to the game.

    I had a concussion a month ago at boxing, and I went on a 3 week recovery phase with no sparring. The doctor told me 2-3 months, but I have a fight on May 12. I'm a competitive athlete, so I understand Iman's and Derrick's pain.

    I wish I can find a connect so I can apply for a position as the Knicks athletic trainer, I really have researched my methods and have gotten results. I can't see why I can't do a better job than Robert Hines. Whats funny is that boxing has less injuries than the NBA, but its a much more physical and dangerous sport. Recovery in boxing is KEY, and some boxers won't even train if they are not 100%. More percussion is needed if you're going to invest so much money into athletes. Thats why the NBA goes bankrupt and will go bankrupt again, its a rich league ran by idiots.

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    Veteran Sprewell-Houston's Avatar
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    Do you have a degree?

    You can forget about pro sports if you ain't got a degree as a strength and conditioning coach, physiotherapist or sports scientist.

    Injuries are part of the game, in every sport that involves contact, athleticism, pace and stress.

    It's a pretty ridiculous statement to claim all NBA trainers are incompetent.
    First of all, you can't compare College to the pro game. Secondly, Euro League players suffer injuries too.

    Thirdly, injuries happen in other major sports too, Football, Soccer etc. basically every sport that involves pace, athleticism, contact and stress.

    You wouldn't believe how many Soccer players go down with major knee injuries in Europe.

    A lot of NFL players go down with knee, hamstring, quad, ankle injuries too that aren't caused by tackles, but overstressing.

    I think you look at it way too simple and too one-dimensional.

    These trainers know what they are doing and 99% of them got a degree in eitther strength and conditioning, physiotherapy or sports science.

    Of course there are always a couple of guys out there who are not keeping up with time and who use rather ineffecient training methods, but to condem a whole branch is pretty ridiculous.

    To follow you logic, athletic trainers in Soccer and maybe even Football must suck too?!

    I appreciate your efforts in College and I'm honestly sure that you know a whole lot about training methods etc, but the pro game is a whole nother story.

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    It just looked like Shump, planted wrong.I'm not sure that could have been avoided.

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    Why are you assuming I don't have a degree? You just wasted an entire of post of nothing, seems like you just wanted to get words out of me.

    Bachelors in Ex. Science, 11' with 5+ years in the field at 23 + ACSM CPT cert and CSCS cert.

    Please tell us your experiences of professionalism in pro sports, go ahead and share. We're waiting to hear your wisdom.

    BTW. A degree doesn't mean you're qualified all the time. I have one, as well as many of my friends. The topic isn't about degrees nor does it make you a better or more superior person. I've seen trainers without degrees who've been more succesful than others, also vice verse. It goes beyond the degree, simple one.

    Degree just says you successfully completed the 4-5 year conditioning process where you'll be the same professional as everyone else with a degree because thats what you spent your entire time in school doing. Researching, experience in the field, applying your practice and doing testing will set you apart from that.

    Not to go all Dr. Seus on your ass but... Do Creation, not Regurgitation. Regurgitating what you learned at school is simple, simple like you. The ones who distinguished themselves in the world are the ones who create.

    The Wright brothers were presented books and information that flying was not possible for humans. Did they yes the book, eat the information and shunned down anyone who presented an idea that counters that information? No. Not all. They successfully did the first flight and went against the information that was presented to the them in their school years.

    These trainers with masters and PhD are no different from each other. They copy each other's methods and have no style or sense of creation. I've seen it in a lot of areas in the field, and its really no different in any other field beyond training. In this monetary system, everyone copies and does things simply. No one takes the time to sit down, look at the sky and just f*cking think. Think on their own and see what their wonderful brain that they don't use can come up with.

    Well, I'm talking about new training methods that aren't common amognst athletic training.
    but you're the professional here, so feel free to share with us what you think should be done...really, now that you open up, its your time to share.

    Here are my questions to you.

    Do you have a degree?
    Do you have any experiences in working with athletes and a coaching staff in Division 1 NCAA? If so, how long?
    Do you have any experiences in working with NBA players and staff? if so, how long?
    Are you certified in anything with 5+ years of experience?

    How do I look simple here? I'm opening up an discussion and getting forum members thinking critically, even you. But all you're saying NFL players go down with injuries because of overstressing? Not only thats a boring statement that generics no thoughts or opens discussion... Thats the most simple way to poorly analyze a statement that shows you're the generic sports fan who sits on the couch, munches on doritos and watches ESPN 5-7 hours a day. Watching the injury reports on ESPN doesn't make you an expert on injuries, NFL, Soccer, MLB, and all sports injuries go beyond "overstressing". I'm here talking about kinetics but thats "simple", but your dumbass is here talking some non-sense about overstressing. Is that really the best you can come up with it?

    I don't know where I said all training staffs are a fail, maybe you're just reaching for an argument and just have nothing to do on a Sunday morning besides jerk off and overeat.(I'm messing with you don't take offense, I do the same thing) Phoneix Suns are known by the NBA for keeping their players in top shape. If you take a look at Boris Diaw and saw the shape he was in Phoneix in comparison to Charlotte, you will see the difference a training staff makes.

    Originally Posted by fender0577
    It just looked like Shump, planted wrong.I'm not sure that could have been avoided.
    Like I said earlier, If one part injured, the others are affected, as the balance between them is disturbed; Shumpert faced an injury this season previously. Robert Hines and Knicks staff didn't apply enough therapy and gave Shumpert time to recover 100%. Stabilization is vital, planting "wrong" isn't the concept. Accidents happen, but thats the difference between a professional athlete and world class athletes. World class athletes train their stabilizer muscles to avoid injuries and keep they body prepared for contact or taking a bad fall.

    Why do you think boxers workout their neck muscles so much? Boxers take shots to the face, particularly the eye socket, nasal area and most critically the chin. Neck stabilization helps the chin absorb the power from the punch so the boxer won't get their knees buckled and can take a punch. A granite chin is genetic, but a glass jaw you can work on it with stabilization around the stern. Listen, I've had my knees buckles once in the ring, ever since that, I just get a towel, go into a headstand with my legs handing on the corner of the ropes and do a lot of neck exercises. Ever since that(even though the goal is avoid getting hit and evade), there hasn't been a shot that has phased me.

    Point is, we may have lost a very special player in Shumpert.

    A strong Larry Hughes type player. Basically the perfect SG with an improving jumpshot that Allan Houston worked on.

    Training staffs need more control of the players or just need to give up their protocols because its affecting this franchise a lot. If you been a fan of this team the past decade, you would understand.

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    I kinda have to side with Metro on this one just for the fact that 9 of our 15 players suffered injuries that sat them for an extended period of time. Idk about other teams but that just seems a little over the top. I guess Jort's broken hand can't be put on the trainers but every team played the same amount of games and a shortened condensed season and yet we looked the most unprepared physically and it's been killing our chemistry. Our entire team has yet to really play together.

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    Originally Posted by metrocard
    Why are you assuming I don't have a degree? You just wasted an entire of post of nothing, seems like you just wanted to get words out of me.

    Bachelors in Ex. Science, 11' with 5+ years in the field at 23 + ACSM CPT cert and CSCS cert.

    Please tell us your experiences of professionalism in pro sports, go ahead and share. We're waiting to hear your wisdom.

    BTW. A degree doesn't mean you're qualified all the time. I have one, as well as many of my friends. The topic isn't about degrees nor does it make you a better or more superior person. I've seen trainers without degrees who've been more succesful than others, also vice verse. It goes beyond the degree, simple one.

    Degree just says you successfully completed the 4-5 year conditioning process where you'll be the same professional as everyone else with a degree because thats what you spent your entire time in school doing. Researching, experience in the field, applying your practice and doing testing will set you apart from that.

    Not to go all Dr. Seus on your ass but... Do Creation, not Regurgitation. Regurgitating what you learned at school is simple, simple like you. The ones who distinguished themselves in the world are the ones who create.

    The Wright brothers were presented books and information that flying was not possible for humans. Did they yes the book, eat the information and shunned down anyone who presented an idea that counters that information? No. Not all. They successfully did the first flight and went against the information that was presented to the them in their school years.

    These trainers with masters and PhD are no different from each other. They copy each other's methods and have no style or sense of creation. I've seen it in a lot of areas in the field, and its really no different in any other field beyond training. In this monetary system, everyone copies and does things simply. No one takes the time to sit down, look at the sky and just f*cking think. Think on their own and see what their wonderful brain that they don't use can come up with.

    Well, I'm talking about new training methods that aren't common amognst athletic training.
    but you're the professional here, so feel free to share with us what you think should be done...really, now that you open up, its your time to share.

    Here are my questions to you.

    Do you have a degree?
    Do you have any experiences in working with athletes and a coaching staff in Division 1 NCAA? If so, how long?
    Do you have any experiences in working with NBA players and staff? if so, how long?
    Are you certified in anything with 5+ years of experience?

    How do I look simple here? I'm opening up an discussion and getting forum members thinking critically, even you. But all you're saying NFL players go down with injuries because of overstressing? Not only thats a boring statement that generics no thoughts or opens discussion... Thats the most simple way to poorly analyze a statement that shows you're the generic sports fan who sits on the couch, munches on doritos and watches ESPN 5-7 hours a day. Watching the injury reports on ESPN doesn't make you an expert on injuries, NFL, Soccer, MLB, and all sports injuries go beyond "overstressing". I'm here talking about kinetics but thats "simple", but your dumbass is here talking some non-sense about overstressing. Is that really the best you can come up with it?

    I don't know where I said all training staffs are a fail, maybe you're just reaching for an argument and just have nothing to do on a Sunday morning besides jerk off and overeat.(I'm messing with you don't take offense, I do the same thing) Phoneix Suns are known by the NBA for keeping their players in top shape. If you take a look at Boris Diaw and saw the shape he was in Phoneix in comparison to Charlotte, you will see the difference a training staff makes.



    Like I said earlier, If one part injured, the others are affected, as the balance between them is disturbed; Shumpert faced an injury this season previously. Robert Hines and Knicks staff didn't apply enough therapy and gave Shumpert time to recover 100%. Stabilization is vital, planting "wrong" isn't the concept. Accidents happen, but thats the difference between a professional athlete and world class athletes. World class athletes train their stabilizer muscles to avoid injuries and keep they body prepared for contact or taking a bad fall.

    Why do you think boxers workout their neck muscles so much? Boxers take shots to the face, particularly the eye socket, nasal area and most critically the chin. Neck stabilization helps the chin absorb the power from the punch so the boxer won't get their knees buckled and can take a punch. A granite chin is genetic, but a glass jaw you can work on it with stabilization around the stern. Listen, I've had my knees buckles once in the ring, ever since that, I just get a towel, go into a headstand with my legs handing on the corner of the ropes and do a lot of neck exercises. Ever since that(even though the goal is avoid getting hit and evade), there hasn't been a shot that has phased me.

    Point is, we may have lost a very special player in Shumpert.

    A strong Larry Hughes type player. Basically the perfect SG with an improving jumpshot that Allan Houston worked on.

    Training staffs need more control of the players or just need to give up their protocols because its affecting this franchise a lot. If you been a fan of this team the past decade, you would understand.
    Metro i didn't disagree with you, all i was saying is that it looked like a freak injury.

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    Originally Posted by metrocard
    Why are you assuming I don't have a degree? You just wasted an entire of post of nothing, seems like you just wanted to get words out of me.

    Bachelors in Ex. Science, 11' with 5+ years in the field at 23 + ACSM CPT cert and CSCS cert.

    Please tell us your experiences of professionalism in pro sports, go ahead and share. We're waiting to hear your wisdom.

    BTW. A degree doesn't mean you're qualified all the time. I have one, as well as many of my friends. The topic isn't about degrees nor does it make you a better or more superior person. I've seen trainers without degrees who've been more succesful than others, also vice verse. It goes beyond the degree, simple one.

    Degree just says you successfully completed the 4-5 year conditioning process where you'll be the same professional as everyone else with a degree because thats what you spent your entire time in school doing. Researching, experience in the field, applying your practice and doing testing will set you apart from that.

    Not to go all Dr. Seus on your ass but... Do Creation, not Regurgitation. Regurgitating what you learned at school is simple, simple like you. The ones who distinguished themselves in the world are the ones who create.

    The Wright brothers were presented books and information that flying was not possible for humans. Did they yes the book, eat the information and shunned down anyone who presented an idea that counters that information? No. Not all. They successfully did the first flight and went against the information that was presented to the them in their school years.

    These trainers with masters and PhD are no different from each other. They copy each other's methods and have no style or sense of creation. I've seen it in a lot of areas in the field, and its really no different in any other field beyond training. In this monetary system, everyone copies and does things simply. No one takes the time to sit down, look at the sky and just f*cking think. Think on their own and see what their wonderful brain that they don't use can come up with.

    Well, I'm talking about new training methods that aren't common amognst athletic training.
    but you're the professional here, so feel free to share with us what you think should be done...really, now that you open up, its your time to share.

    Here are my questions to you.

    Do you have a degree?
    Do you have any experiences in working with athletes and a coaching staff in Division 1 NCAA? If so, how long?
    Do you have any experiences in working with NBA players and staff? if so, how long?
    Are you certified in anything with 5+ years of experience?

    How do I look simple here? I'm opening up an discussion and getting forum members thinking critically, even you. But all you're saying NFL players go down with injuries because of overstressing? Not only thats a boring statement that generics no thoughts or opens discussion... Thats the most simple way to poorly analyze a statement that shows you're the generic sports fan who sits on the couch, munches on doritos and watches ESPN 5-7 hours a day. Watching the injury reports on ESPN doesn't make you an expert on injuries, NFL, Soccer, MLB, and all sports injuries go beyond "overstressing". I'm here talking about kinetics but thats "simple", but your dumbass is here talking some non-sense about overstressing. Is that really the best you can come up with it?

    I don't know where I said all training staffs are a fail, maybe you're just reaching for an argument and just have nothing to do on a Sunday morning besides jerk off and overeat.(I'm messing with you don't take offense, I do the same thing) Phoneix Suns are known by the NBA for keeping their players in top shape. If you take a look at Boris Diaw and saw the shape he was in Phoneix in comparison to Charlotte, you will see the difference a training staff makes.



    Like I said earlier, If one part injured, the others are affected, as the balance between them is disturbed; Shumpert faced an injury this season previously. Robert Hines and Knicks staff didn't apply enough therapy and gave Shumpert time to recover 100%. Stabilization is vital, planting "wrong" isn't the concept. Accidents happen, but thats the difference between a professional athlete and world class athletes. World class athletes train their stabilizer muscles to avoid injuries and keep they body prepared for contact or taking a bad fall.

    Why do you think boxers workout their neck muscles so much? Boxers take shots to the face, particularly the eye socket, nasal area and most critically the chin. Neck stabilization helps the chin absorb the power from the punch so the boxer won't get their knees buckled and can take a punch. A granite chin is genetic, but a glass jaw you can work on it with stabilization around the stern. Listen, I've had my knees buckles once in the ring, ever since that, I just get a towel, go into a headstand with my legs handing on the corner of the ropes and do a lot of neck exercises. Ever since that(even though the goal is avoid getting hit and evade), there hasn't been a shot that has phased me.

    Point is, we may have lost a very special player in Shumpert.

    A strong Larry Hughes type player. Basically the perfect SG with an improving jumpshot that Allan Houston worked on.

    Training staffs need more control of the players or just need to give up their protocols because its affecting this franchise a lot. If you been a fan of this team the past decade, you would understand.

    Chill. All I said is that without a degree you can most definitely forget about pro sports, everything else was made up by you.

    Take a look at NBA or NFL team pages and you'll notice that 99% of the athletic trainers have degrees.

    No need to turn that into a social discussion, whether people with College degrees are more competent than others or not. That'S bull**** and I won't discuss that with you.

    All I'm saying is that pro leagues demand degrees, right or wrong - that's not on me to judge that.

    It seems like you're looking for dispute on this tpic, but I'm not biting bro.

    Like I said, I'm sure you're a very competent trainer and I really respect your degrees, having a Master of Science degree myself I know how much work it takes.

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    Super Moderator RunningJumper's Avatar
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    I'm still wondering if athletes work too much on the size (and strength?) of their bodies. I know not everyone is Iverson who can takes massive amount of hits at that size, but it seems like "the getting bigger" thing hasn't proven to make a difference. I also wonder what these players' diets are. Overweight or not, players should be on top of their game with diets. I don't know if Turkoglu still does it, eating pizza before every game isn't the best thing for you.

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    Knicks trainers should refrain from doing these exercises next season


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    As an experienced athletic trainer, what do u suggest to prevent knee injuries such as ACL tears, etc. I ask because I am curious as someone who plays many sports and that fear is always in my mind.

    Thanks.

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    Originally Posted by NYNYK
    As an experienced athletic trainer, what do u suggest to prevent knee injuries such as ACL tears, etc. I ask because I am curious as someone who plays many sports and that fear is always in my mind.

    Thanks.
    Do some research in understanding the interplay between biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors(Kinematic and kinetic differences, jump landings, sidestep and cutting maneuvers,
    muscular differences, altered muscle activation patterns) and just become aware of the role hormones, functional bracing, and biofeedback play in ACL tears. Once you have a knowledge of what to avoid and how to maintain a stable body for performance, then the ACL injuries will decrease within time.

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    Metro, do you have any opinion on barefoot running/training? On the topic of ACLs, and general foot/lower leg injuries.

    Bought a pair of Adipure Trainers maybe 4 weeks ago; I do my sprints in them, conditioning workouts, and also my strength training. Weird at first, but big fan now. I couldn't prove that they've helped in any way, but I do feel a lot more coordinated and stable from my feet up (literally).

    Lateral movement seems a lot more spry and responsive for me too recently.

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    I think trainers try to hard to build on a players strengths and make them superior in one aspect, make individual workouts for each player, have Melo do a bunch of jogs and spuats and Amar'e do agility ladder all day, make these players weaknesses their strengths and stop tuning into making the good thing about them better.

    Melo needs more stamina and explosiveness.

    Amar'e needs more agility and quicker feet.

    And also i believe that a trainers expectations of return for a player should have an extra week on it just as a cautionary measure. If you think someone will be out 2 weeks then add 1 week and use that 1 week to get their timing and feet back up under them so they don't plant awkwardly or move in a irregular way and potentially injure something. When you don't play for a long time you need to move around to get your coordination right and if not you will land Like D-Rose did and it could be a major injury.

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    in jj leg locks its the samething.
    we either break the ankle or the acl by torqueing twist a extended leg. same as landing twisting, knees are not ment to twist.


    its hard to practice it because its so easy to **** it up.

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