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Thread: This Knicks Draft Season

  1. #16
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    Syracuse product Scoop Jardine traded text messages with Carmelo Anthony all year.

    If he has it his way, he'll be able to throw him passes this fall.

    "It'd be the easiest job in America. To throw passes to Melo and get out of the way," Jardine said earlier this week after working out for the Knicks. "It'll be a dream come true."



    Elsa/Getty ImagesScoop Jardine




    Jardine spent four years at Syracuse filled with "ups and downs." He enters the NBA draft projected by some as a late second-round pick. Others say he will go undrafted.

    The Knicks have the 48th pick. And they need a point guard to play behind/in front of Jeremy Lin. But taking a rookie to fill that role seems like faulty logic.

    They'll also need a shooting guard to take Iman Shumpert's place early in the season, while the 2011 first-round draft pick recovers from knee surgery.

    Landry Fields could be the answer there. He is a restricted free agent this summer.

    If the Knicks don't bring Fields back, they might look outside the organization to fill the void.

    Could Jardine fill that role? Again, the Knicks are unlikely to find a starter with the 48th pick. So Jardine won't be the answer to that issue either.

    But the Knicks could be looking for a third point guard to play behind Lin and the veteran they sign to split the point guard minutes with Lin.

    And that's where Jardine might be a fit.

    If the Knicks do call his name, Jardine, who says he has lost eight pounds since school ended, will be elated.

    After all, he'll get to be reunited with Anthony, the former Syracuse star who texted him motivational messages throughout his senior season.

    "To actually play alongside him would be great," Jardine said.

    WILL TU BE THE ONE FOR THE KNICKS? Tu Holloway grew up in Hempstead, Long Island, with his grandmother.



    AP Photo/David KohlTu Holloway




    If the Knicks select him in the draft, he's not going to waste his money on a Manhattan apartment. Holloway says he'll be moving back in with his grandmother.

    "I'm going to live in my bed room and save some money," Holloway, a star at Xavier, said.

    He was asked if he would still be eating his grandmother's food.

    "I'll definitely be eating out of her fridge, but I'll be the one putting the food in there this time," he said.

    Holloway was involved in the Xavier-Cincinatti brawl. But, he said, he isn't concerned about any lingering negative perceptions from the incident.

    "If anyone checks my track record, I'm a clean-cut guy," Holloway said. "I've never had any legal issues, I've never had any on-campus issues or anything like that."

    Holloway is projected as a mid-second-round pick by some. He said prospective employers shouldn't be scared off by his size (6-feet).

    "I have a 6-6 wingspan and 10-inch hands," he said.
    lol at Tu staying with grandma to save money but, smart.

  2. #17
    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
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    thank you for making a legit thread on this, I need to know what is going on with the prospects

    You should also search for guys that will be taken in the late 1st round and early 2nd because I am sure we will buy another pick just like the past years

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    IF we can buy another pick we should get John Shurna...he looked really good in those films

    Now i know you can make Jared Jeffries look good in a tribute film but it is how he scores...he can shoot, post up, dunk, lay it up...he can do anything on offense really and he has long arms that give him the ability to block shots

    He reminds me a mix of Landry Fields and Novak

    For a PG, I am not sure, no great choices but I saw Tu Holloway play in college and i liked his game

    Scoop Jardine sounds like he will be a knick just because he is a syracuse guy but I feel like Jardin just makes lay ups and nothing else.

    We need a PG with some court vision.

    I like that guy something-odom

    any PG with some strength and court vision

  4. #19
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    Originally Posted by Paul1355
    IF we can buy another pick we should get John Shurna...he looked really good in those films

    Now i know you can make Jared Jeffries look good in a tribute film but it is how he scores...he can shoot, post up, dunk, lay it up...he can do anything on offense really and he has long arms that give him the ability to block shots

    He reminds me a mix of Landry Fields and Novak

    For a PG, I am not sure, no great choices but I saw Tu Holloway play in college and i liked his game

    Scoop Jardine sounds like he will be a knick just because he is a syracuse guy but I feel like Jardin just makes lay ups and nothing else.

    We need a PG with some court vision.

    I like that guy something-odom

    any PG with some strength and court vision

    We can't buy any other picks if im not mistaking. Btw a good point guard with court vision is Scott Machado check him out when you can.

  5. #20
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    Default Sleeper in Round 2


    Standing over 6'9 in shoes with a solid 7'0 wingspan, [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] is a very good athlete for his size, possessing high levels of mobility, quickness, and coordination, to go along with solid explosiveness and power as well. While he doesn't have the greatest frame, it appears as if he could add some more strength to his 220 pound build without sacrificing much athleticism, specifically in the lower body. Regardless, he has at least good physical tools for a power forward or undersized center in the NBA, and very likely could do more to maximize his body as a pro down the road.

    On the offensive end, Watt served as his team's leading scorer and first offensive option this season, despite seeing most of his possessions in traditional role playing situations. While Watt's back-to-the-basket game was the most featured aspect of his offense on the whole, he saw plenty of action spotting up for jumpers and finishing on cuts at the basket, which is beneficial for a potential transition to the NBA in the future.

    Watt's jump shot may actually be his most attractive quality on the offensive end projecting to the NBA, as he has a very capable stroke from the mid-to-long range, while he saw nearly 25% of his field goal attempts in the half court coming in the jump shot variety this season. Watt hit for nearly 1.0 points per shot on jumpers this year according to Synergy while attempting very few three-pointers (he went 11-for-34 from deep on the season), which is certainly good efficiency for a big man specializing in the mid-range game. Watt boasts a solid stroke with consistent mechanics and backs it up at the free-throw line, where he hits for 74% on 5.0 attempts per game, more evidence of his strong shooting ability.

    While Watt wasn't consistently featured in the pick-and-roll game this season (just 15 of his 465 possessions logged by Synergy were tagged as pick-and-roll), he certainly has an intriguing set of tools to play the pick-and-roll game in the NBA, being a more than capable finisher both hitting jumpers and diving to the basket.

    As far as finishing in the paint goes, Watt did a good share of getting to the rim off the ball this year, be it in pick-and-rolls, cuts, or attacking the offensive glass. He shows good hands catching the ball on the move, very good coordination, nice extension to go under the rim, and good touch on finesse finishes. Watt also shows nice reactive athleticism elevating around the rim, especially when unguarded, but shows more trouble utilizing his athleticism when having to deal with contact. He doesn't show much propensity for finishing through defenders and seems to be lacking in his power game both with his upper and lower body, something he'll definitely need to work on to have continued success in this area in the pros.

    The other intriguing aspect of Watt's offense is his surprising ability passing the ball, as he shows good vision and feel operating out of the high and low post with the ball. He does a good job being patient with the ball and is capable of finding teammates either spotting up or cutting to the basket, serving as an effective cog in this area of the game. Watt also does a solid job contributing in other little areas on the offensive end, making flow-of-the-offense passes on the perimeter and being active setting screens to free up teammates, being a solid team player in general showing a decent overall feel for the game.

    Read in its entirety by DraftExpress: [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

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    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by FrazierVocab
    We can't buy any other picks if im not mistaking. Btw a good point guard with court vision is Scott Machado check him out when you can.
    we worked out Machado and I watched his interview at MSG and he looked like he had a good head on his shoulders.

    If he has the court vision then we should not hesitate. We just need a decent back up PG that can orchestrate an offense to some degree.

  7. #22
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    Originally Posted by gmf1369











    Standing over 6'9 in shoes with a solid 7'0 wingspan, [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] is a very good athlete for his size, possessing high levels of mobility, quickness, and coordination, to go along with solid explosiveness and power as well. While he doesn't have the greatest frame, it appears as if he could add some more strength to his 220 pound build without sacrificing much athleticism, specifically in the lower body. Regardless, he has at least good physical tools for a power forward or undersized center in the NBA, and very likely could do more to maximize his body as a pro down the road.



    On the offensive end, Watt served as his team's leading scorer and first offensive option this season, despite seeing most of his possessions in traditional role playing situations. While Watt's back-to-the-basket game was the most featured aspect of his offense on the whole, he saw plenty of action spotting up for jumpers and finishing on cuts at the basket, which is beneficial for a potential transition to the NBA in the future.



    Watt's jump shot may actually be his most attractive quality on the offensive end projecting to the NBA, as he has a very capable stroke from the mid-to-long range, while he saw nearly 25% of his field goal attempts in the half court coming in the jump shot variety this season. Watt hit for nearly 1.0 points per shot on jumpers this year according to Synergy while attempting very few three-pointers (he went 11-for-34 from deep on the season), which is certainly good efficiency for a big man specializing in the mid-range game. Watt boasts a solid stroke with consistent mechanics and backs it up at the free-throw line, where he hits for 74% on 5.0 attempts per game, more evidence of his strong shooting ability.



    While Watt wasn't consistently featured in the pick-and-roll game this season (just 15 of his 465 possessions logged by Synergy were tagged as pick-and-roll), he certainly has an intriguing set of tools to play the pick-and-roll game in the NBA, being a more than capable finisher both hitting jumpers and diving to the basket.



    As far as finishing in the paint goes, Watt did a good share of getting to the rim off the ball this year, be it in pick-and-rolls, cuts, or attacking the offensive glass. He shows good hands catching the ball on the move, very good coordination, nice extension to go under the rim, and good touch on finesse finishes. Watt also shows nice reactive athleticism elevating around the rim, especially when unguarded, but shows more trouble utilizing his athleticism when having to deal with contact. He doesn't show much propensity for finishing through defenders and seems to be lacking in his power game both with his upper and lower body, something he'll definitely need to work on to have continued success in this area in the pros.



    The other intriguing aspect of Watt's offense is his surprising ability passing the ball, as he shows good vision and feel operating out of the high and low post with the ball. He does a good job being patient with the ball and is capable of finding teammates either spotting up or cutting to the basket, serving as an effective cog in this area of the game. Watt also does a solid job contributing in other little areas on the offensive end, making flow-of-the-offense passes on the perimeter and being active setting screens to free up teammates, being a solid team player in general showing a decent overall feel for the game.



    Read in its entirety by DraftExpress: [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]



    Nice call. I gave him a long look the other day myself -- highlights, write-ups, college stats, etc.. Never saw Watt play live but from just doing a little homework on him, I came away impressed...Real nice package of skills...So much to like -- big and long (6'10"-ish with a 7-foot wingspan), effective lefty jumper with range, post up skills, mobile, above average athlete, high b-ball IQ, fine passer for a big, shot-blocking potential (averaged 2.2 blks his junior & senior seasons)... When I first saw him shoot the ball from deep I immediately thought of Brandon Costner, a 6'9" 235 lb hybrid forward who went undrafted out of NC State a few yrs ago. Costner had a nice year in the D-League last yr going for over 20 pts a game and converting on nearly 40% of his 3s. Watt may not have as pure a stroke or as much range as Costner but he looks to be a superior player in just about every other area -- passing, post-up ability, rebounding, shot-blocking, etc. I wouldn't be too upset if we grabbed this kid at 48.

    Still collating info. on guys but as of right now, I got my eye on these 4:

    SG Kim English - 6'6" 2G, converted a whopping 46% of his 3s last year.

    SG Kevin Murphy - 6'7" wing who can really shoot & score the ball.

    PF Mitchell Watt - 6'10" PF, looks like he could really impact a game on both ends with his wide range of skills.

    PG Scott Machado - 6'1" PG can shoot and really facilitate & pass well. This doesn't look like a pretty deep PG draft after Marshall and Teague (Teague may actually stay another year--I think he should). If this guy miraculously happens to be there at 48, knowing Lin's coming off the knee injury and Bibby and Baron probably won't be back (they probably don't want either guy back provided they came up with better alternatives), we should probably take him. I still maintain we can find some pretty good PG talent elsewhere on the cheap (Matt Jannning, Ben Hansbrough, Curtis Jerrells, Demetri McCamey) but I know the Knicks probably won't look at any of these guys...I can't imagine them passing this kid up if he's still on the board when they pick.
    Last edited by finestrg; May 29, 2012 at 02:12.

  8. #23
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    Been looking at some more video of Watt -- the one guy he probably resembles the most in the NBA is Josh McRoberts. That might be the closest player comparison for him right now. I personally like McRoberts a lot. He showed he belonged in the NBA a couple of years ago when he was finally seeing some decent mins with the Pacers.. McRoberts is a lot more skilled than people think..We could definitely use a guy like that.

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    With my colleague Ryan Feldman, an ESPN Stats & Info college hoops researcher and co-founder of The Hoops Report, I've pinpointed five power forwards the Knicks could pick at No. 48 (for offense and defense).

    1. Yancy Gates (Cincinnati): Gates' draft stock dipped after his involvement in an ugly brawl with Xavier in early December, which resulted in a six-game suspension. He plays aggressively, but sometimes needs to tone it down. He also needs to change his scoring mentality, as he tends to play 15 feet away from the basket and shoot midrange jumpers. But when he plays inside, he's a beast and double-double threat. He's a strong four at 6-9, 260 pounds, and can do lots of work down low offensively and defensively.

    2. Kevin Jones (West Virginia): Jones is a natural four who is a creative scorer in post-up situations, even hitting tough, turnaround jump hooks. This past year, he became more of a versatile scorer, refining his pull-up and dribble-drive game, but he's still an average outside shooter. At 6-8, 260, he's strong and has great timing on the boards, including the offensive glass. Defensively, what may be most impressive is that after he scores, he hardly ever celebrates, but almost always runs back to get into defensive position.

    3. Cameron Moore (UAB): Even though Moore (6-10, 230) played four years in college, he's still a bit raw. At this point, his game is almost confined to the paint area, and he doesn't have many skillful post moves. He's also not a good passer out of double teams. But what he does have is a tremendous motor, which helps him score quickly and get into positions early to rebound and block shots. If he develops his down-low game -- not just being a highlight reel -- and refines his midrange jump shot, he'll be a surprise prospect.

    4. Andrew Nicholson (St. Bonaventure): Nicholson (6-9, 240) plays with a lot of confidence, as he constantly demands the ball in the post and likes to go to work quickly. He can shoot the turnaround and score with either hand, and his long stride gets him to the basket faster. But he tends to use the same combination to score -- a spin, hesitation and then layup. From outside, he has a quick release and has range. He just needs to play more aggressive offensively; he doesn't dunk a lot. He may get drafted higher, but could slip.

    5. Wesley Witherspoon (Memphis): Witherspoon (6-9, 207) has always had potential, but he hasn't shown up yet consistently. As a senior, he would sometimes go from two points in one game to 15 the next, or vice versa. He actually has a lot of guard skills and when his jumper is on, he's dangerous. He's also effective attacking the basket in face-up situations and shows a commitment to D. He just needs to develop more of an interior game, but with the right NBA coaching, he could make a decent impact in his rookie season.
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    There's no question the Knicks have vacancies at the guard position with Iman Shumpert and Baron Davis out long term, Mike Bibby an unrestricted free agent, and Toney Douglas with no defined role.

    But don't overlook the team's need to upgrade their frontcourt off the bench, especially because Carmelo Anthony doesn't have a lot of backup and the injury-prone Jared Jeffries is an unrestricted free agent. Even if Jeffries returns, which is likely at the veteran's minimum of $1.4 million, the Knicks will need more youth, size, scoring, athleticism, rebounding and defending in the second unit.

    In addition to Jeffries, while Josh Harrellson is a big body, he's not athletic enough; he's more of an outside shooter. Also, Steve Novak is strictly a shooter and Jerome Jordan is still a developing talent. The Knicks could use another player, whether it be a rookie or veteran, who can shoot, be an interior presence and make plays on both ends of the court.

    With my colleague Ryan Feldman, an ESPN Stats & Info college hoops researcher and co-founder of The Hoops Report, I've pinpointed five small forwards and five power forwards who the Knicks could pick at No. 48 (for offense and defense).

    First, for small forwards:

    1. Jae Crowder (Marquette) -- The consensus on Crowder is that there isn't an exact position for him. But that's because he's viewed as a very good all-around player who has the size (6-6, 235) to play inside and out. He was basically a double-double machine this past season and he would likely become a fan favorite in New York for his intensity, toughness, active motor and unique style (he has long dreadlocks). Perhaps most impressive is that he has an NBA-needed quick release and range to 3-point territory.

    2. Draymond Green (Michigan State) -- While Green is the same size as Crowder, he's not as athletic and his release is a bit slower because he takes more time to set up. Crowder is better on the catch-and-shoot. But Green is more skilled on the block on offense and defense. He makes strong moves, has good footwork, an effective spin move and a nice touch around the basket. He can also initiate the fast break, handle the ball a bit in the half court and pass well to teammates from the wing and out of the post.

    3. Kris Joseph (Syracuse) -- The Knicks could have two Orangemen to choose from with the 48th pick. One is point guard Scoop Jardine; the other could be Joseph (6-7, 207), who can drain the outside jump shot and finish with authority. However, he needs to add more creativity to his drives in half-court sets. He's more of a linear penetrator who likes to rely on his long strides to get to the basket. But in the NBA that won't cut it. Defensively, he plays passing lanes well and has the ability to be a one-man fast break.

    4. Khris Middleton (Texas A&M) -- Middleton (6-7, 215) could have been a lottery pick if he didn't suffer a partially torn right meniscus in November, which required surgery and him to miss about four weeks. When he returned from the injury, he looked out of sync. For example, his 3-point shooting dropped from 36.1 percent as a sophomore to 26 this past year. But the potential is there because of his skills and athleticism. He's a solid isolation scorer, creative dribbler and locked in on D, but he needs to work on his rebounding.

    5. Kostas Papanikolaou (Greece) -- The lefty Papanikolaou (6-8, 225) is a little bit of a cross between foreign NBA players Manu Ginobili and Carlos Delfino. He has some craftiness like Ginobili -- he has crossover moves, can split defenders and knows how to finish -- but he's not as good of a passer. Papanikolaou is a pure scorer, who also demonstrates defensive intensity like Delfino. In fact, he'll hustle back and make blocks in transition. Like both of the current NBA players, Papanikolaou's best asset is arguably his 3-point shot.

  10. #25
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    We should trade Fields to Dallas for their 1st round pick and pick up Moe Harkless, he's going to be very dynamic (Rudy Gay type player), good off bench and security at SF behind Melosito.

    Kostas Papanikolaou is a good SG option for us.

    Scott Machado can pass his ass off, so he'll be another smart option for us since our only passer on the team is J-Lin.

  11. #26
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    it would be great and a steal, but i'm not holding my breath if we can land machado. he's on a high radar.

    another steal would be this very VERY impressive kid...
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    massive potential and i would love to see knicks develope this kid.

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    After an impressive junior season that saw [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] average 24.4 points per-40 minutes pace adjusted and emerge as one of the most versatile scoring big men in college basketball, he has struggled to take the next step as an all-around prospect individually, and has been unable to help his St. Bonaventure team get over the hump in the Atlantic-10 as well. 16 games into the season, Nicholson has seen his production drop to 21.5 points-per-40 pace adjusted while his true shooting percentage has dropped substantially, from 57.1% to 51.7%.

    Nevertheless, standing 6'9” with excellent length and big hands, Nicholson has some intriguing aspects of his game, both in terms of his physical profile and from a skills perspective—and is almost certainly not a finished product yet.

    Offensively, Nicholson relies heavily on a very refined post game that's tough to defend at this level, particularly when paired with the improving perimeter game he showed last year. With good footwork, counter moves, and an ability to finish with either hand, Nicholson has plenty of moves in the low post. According to Synergy Sports Technology, Nicholson is shooting 54% in post-up situations, while doing a solid job of drawing contact and getting to the line.

    Turnovers tend to be a problem for Nicholson, and his 3.8 turnovers per 40 minutes pace adjusted is one of the worst numbers in our top 100 ranking. This is especially troubling considering how infrequently he creates for his teammates, with a pure passer rating of -7.97, which is the worst in our top 100.

    The overall talent level at St. Bonaventure leaves a lot to be desired, and as such he's probably asked to create more for himself than he optimally would. Despite that, he doesn't do a very good job of recognizing double teams and could continue to improve his ball-handling and decision making skills.

    On the perimeter is where Nicholson differentiates himself from other big men prospects in this draft in terms of his talent-level. While not an exceptional athlete at the NBA level, Nicholson is a fluid and mobile big man with a long first step and an intriguing skill-level that gives him the ability to make very impressive plays at times. Although he's not terribly polished or consistent at this point in his career, his ability to face up opponents off the dribble, pull-up off the dribble from the mid-range or take the ball all the way to the basket and finish with his length is very impressive at his size.

    Nicholson did a good job last year of extending his range out to mid-range, something he didn't have prior to his junior season. While he's attempting more 3-pointers this season, he hasn't taken a major step forward with this part of his game, only converting 35% of his jumpers, down from 45% last year. He has decent form on his jump shot and a high release, but hasn't been able to get these shots to fall consistently this year.

    With his slight build it appears likely his post-up game will be less of a weapon in the NBA, so having a consistent catch and shoot game will play a crucial part in his ability to carve out a role for himself.

    On the offensive glass, Nicholson's 3.1 offensive rebounds per 40 minutes pace adjusted is significantly better than the 2.0 per 40 minutes pace adjusted he averaged last year, but still towards the lower part of our database in terms of power forward prospects. Nicholson isn't all that physical of a player, nor is he all that active in fighting for position for offensive rebounds, leading many to question his toughness as a prospect. When he does grab an offensive rebound, he has solid touch and converts them at a decent clip.

    From a defensive standpoint, Nicholson's physical profile presents some potential problems, which are further increased by his inconsistent effort on that end of the court. Nicholson has the length and timing needed to contest and block shots, and because of that can be a useful defender at the collegiate level. At a wiry 220 pounds, he lacks the lower and upper body strength to hold his ground at the next level, and he doesn't do a good job of fighting for position early in the shot clock to make up for that. Again, showing more of a mean streak would greatly benefit him in this regard, but that simply does not appear to be his disposition.

    On the perimeter, Nicholson doesn't move all that well laterally, being very upright in his stance and showing average quickness and fundamentals. He compensates this on pick and rolls by giving a copious amount of room to the ball handler on pick and rolls, something that will likely be exploited at the next level, where he'll be forced to guard NBA power forwards as opposed to collegiate centers.

    On the defensive glass, his 6.7 defensive rebounds per 40 minutes pace adjusted are in the middle of the pack in our rankings. His length helps him in this regard, but he doesn't show great anticipation or technique, and he once again doesn't appear to consistently put in the effort or have the toughness to dominate that facet of the game. Perhaps more than anything this is the part of his game that may be hard to overcome and get playing time, particularly early in his career while he tries to adjust his post game to NBA defenders.

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] has an interesting set of physical tools with his size and length to go along with an offensive skill-set that shows plenty of room for growth. On top of that, he appears to be an extremely intelligent person off the court (he's a physics major), and didn't start playing basketball until his junior year of high school.

    Nicholson came into this season with huge expectations, both individually and team-wise, but hasn't taken the step forward some had hoped he would. NBA decision makers will need to figure out why in trying to evaluate how much better he could become in the next few years, to decide if he's a project worth investing in.

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    Another great call on Nicholson, bro. Too bad that guy won't be anywhere near where we pick. I've seen comparisons to Craig Brackins, JaJuan Johnson.. I think he could be more than that. Long as heck, great post game, great mid-range J, shot-blocker, decent rebounder...The only thing he needs to do is put on some more weight and get stronger..He ever does that..look out!

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    Originally Posted by BananaSauce
    it would be great and a steal, but i'm not holding my breath if we can land machado. he's on a high radar.

    another steal would be this very VERY impressive kid...
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    massive potential and i would love to see knicks develope this kid.

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    The Nicholson article is old, when that was written prob mid season he was being projected late 2nd round, he had some illness I am forgetting and definitely didn't look real aggressive. After that article he lead us to a 3rd or 4th place finish (I'm bonas alum, got a sick picture in a bar down there with nicholson, he's a real good dude too, real humble), won the A-10 tourney and got the NCAA birth. Now projected late 1st round. I agree he could slip, but doubt it'll be to 48, though I'd love him in a Knick jersey

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    that's good info.

    i just hope we can steal one of these guys.

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    Considering the its a second round pick and the fact that two years in row lack of PG depth was a major issue going into the post season I hope they go PG unless somebody good drops (though thats unlikely).

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