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Thread: "The Message"...influences of hip-hop/rap music

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    Originally Posted by KBlack25
    I actually wrote a paper for school about the influences of rap music and its effect on the communities from which the rappers themselves come from. I also just bought a book (I'm not too far into it yet) called "The Hip Hop Wars" where it talks about the media's attack on hip hop culture.

    The problem is that much of mainstream media does not understand rap or where the lyrics are coming from. Some may sound violent, but I specifically cited in my paper a song from the newest Mobb Deep album (I know, it's G-Unit Mobb Deep and not the real Mobb but it still has a lot of relevance), in which Prodigy I believe claims he feels left deserted by God in the hood and his projects. He says he will beat God down if he doesn't get into heaven because he was given no signs he was being watched over by Him and felt left alone. The issue is that white mainstream media (see: Bill O'Reilly) will claim this shows a violent nature. My paper basically was about not that the violent rap lyrics created violent and destitute neighborhoods, but rather that the violent and destitute neigborhoods create the violent lyrics. What white mainstream media fails to understand is a lot of the violence set forth in rap lyrics is a reflection of the neighborhoods in which people grew up. I cited Russel Simmons who criticized the government's war on rap stating that the government should, rather than attack the people talking about violence, attack the source of why the rappers see violence and destitution in their neighborhoods.

    I agree with a lot of the sentiment on this board, that the south especially has watered down rap but it's actually a lot deeper than that. There is still rap out there that purports reflections on society. The problem is that white record executives want to sell an oversexualized black male and female image, that reflects partying and drinking and sexual promiscuity because it is a caricature of the black man. The white man holds the key to record sales, as most record execs are white (even if black people own the label, distributors are primarily white). Rather than sign people who have disdain for the the system and would look to revolutionize black people's roles in society (and thus limit white people's power over society), they will sign people they think will sell record, promote "club songs" and videos that keep the black rapper in a subservient position. I don't know if any body has heard Skills' 2008 Rap Up, but in it he makes a statement about the rap scene in general, making fun of T-Pain:

    And y'all in his lane
    with songs like "OHHH We Pop Champagne"
    So Imma say this quick: We in a recession
    Stop Lying
    Y'all ain't poppin ****


    If you haven't heard the Skills Rap Up get on that ****, it's hot and he's actually got a good message like "It's a time for a change/so don't go turnin inaguration into an all-star game/let's act right/and show these kids/we can turn yes we can into yes we did".

    There's is rap with a message out there, but don't expect to hear it on the radio.


    LMAO

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    Im 34 years old. I used to love rap when i was a teenager. stuff like the geto boys, nwa, das-efx, public enemy, big daddy kane, special ed, I can go on and on..rap nowadayas..well let me just say

    oh someone mentioned that live your life song with Rihanna and TI is it? I actually like that song hahaaa

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    Its cool to hear all the different points that are being made. Point of views that explain how rap has devolved throughout the years.

    Prince and Akamu, what I got from what you guys were saying was that rap music aint what it used to be, and how y'all had the option to listen to the classic joints. But a lot of the kids these days don't have that option because they don't know about the music you guys know about. Same goes for these new pop rappers. Most of them are not influenced by the great MC's of the early 90's because they were not exposed to good music.


    The first time I heard Illmatic in its entirety was in 2002, my freshman year of college. And it was because I was first discovering all this great music from a decade ago. Nobody said to me "here, listen to this". The point I'm getting at is to influence the youth, by showing them that there's actually great music underneath all this bubblegum rap that's out now. Only then will hip-hop/rap music flourish once again.

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    Rap has always had it's sketchy artist's, but it was viewed back in the day as something that would not last long. So they let it ride. Now they blame rap for everything wrong with today's youth. Go figure.

    It is by far the influential music of the last 25-30 years. And unfortunately, it probably does more harm, than good now. There is hardly anything that comes on that I would be cool letting my kids listen to, because even artist that are truly for the art form, conform to today's standard a bit to try and sell records. Sux, but true.

    Not really a whole lot of rappers that are nice to me now though. The late 80's to about 98, we saw a peak of talent like never again probably. But then again, I had a whole different mind frame and perspective then.

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    exactly sly but you see you gotta listen to both types of rap, the "I aint mad at cha" and the "Lollipop" you'll see a hue difference in the music and listening to Nas, Biggie, Tupac, Jay-z make you wanna throw up when u listen to todays hiphop it's way to commercialized nowadays and no one does it with a passion anymore, I dont get the same feeling listening to todays hits and the songs by greats like Tupac and Biggie...not the same feeling you could hear it in the music...

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    Originally Posted by DaTPRiNCE
    exactly sly but you see you gotta listen to both types of rap, the "I aint mad at cha" and the "Lollipop" you'll see a hue difference in the music and listening to Nas, Biggie, Tupac, Jay-z make you wanna throw up when u listen to todays hiphop it's way to commercialized nowadays and no one does it with a passion anymore, I dont get the same feeling listening to todays hits and the songs by greats like Tupac and Biggie...not the same feeling you could hear it in the music...
    What's a waste is how these wack rappers rap their bad rhymes on these good beats. If the old school emcees had what these fools have, all their songs would of been classics. Too much looping back in the day.

    A song that made me want to punch the DJ was hurricane chris' "hey baybay". First time I heard that **** I actually thought it was some fool that had paid the DJ to play his song. I was like "why you gotta kill the vibe for?!"

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    Originally Posted by KBlack25
    I actually wrote a paper for school about the influences of rap music and its effect on the communities from which the rappers themselves come from. I also just bought a book (I'm not too far into it yet) called "The Hip Hop Wars" where it talks about the media's attack on hip hop culture.

    The problem is that much of mainstream media does not understand rap or where the lyrics are coming from. Some may sound violent, but I specifically cited in my paper a song from the newest Mobb Deep album (I know, it's G-Unit Mobb Deep and not the real Mobb but it still has a lot of relevance), in which Prodigy I believe claims he feels left deserted by God in the hood and his projects. He says he will beat God down if he doesn't get into heaven because he was given no signs he was being watched over by Him and felt left alone. The issue is that white mainstream media (see: Bill O'Reilly) will claim this shows a violent nature. My paper basically was about not that the violent rap lyrics created violent and destitute neighborhoods, but rather that the violent and destitute neigborhoods create the violent lyrics. What white mainstream media fails to understand is a lot of the violence set forth in rap lyrics is a reflection of the neighborhoods in which people grew up. I cited Russel Simmons who criticized the government's war on rap stating that the government should, rather than attack the people talking about violence, attack the source of why the rappers see violence and destitution in their neighborhoods.

    I agree with a lot of the sentiment on this board, that the south especially has watered down rap but it's actually a lot deeper than that. There is still rap out there that purports reflections on society. The problem is that white record executives want to sell an oversexualized black male and female image, that reflects partying and drinking and sexual promiscuity because it is a caricature of the black man. The white man holds the key to record sales, as most record execs are white (even if black people own the label, distributors are primarily white). Rather than sign people who have disdain for the the system and would look to revolutionize black people's roles in society (and thus limit white people's power over society), they will sign people they think will sell record, promote "club songs" and videos that keep the black rapper in a subservient position. I don't know if any body has heard Skills' 2008 Rap Up, but in it he makes a statement about the rap scene in general, making fun of T-Pain:

    And y'all in his lane
    with songs like "OHHH We Pop Champagne"
    So Imma say this quick: We in a recession
    Stop Lying
    Y'all ain't poppin ****

    If you haven't heard the Skills Rap Up get on that ****, it's hot and he's actually got a good message like "It's a time for a change/so don't go turnin inaguration into an all-star game/let's act right/and show these kids/we can turn yes we can into yes we did".

    There's is rap with a message out there, but don't expect to hear it on the radio.



    Kblack, I think its safe to say that these rappers won't be discussed in college lectures. As for the other point you brought up, the record execs sign rappers that will bring them money. If sounding like ignorant mofos is what's hot right now they will sign 'em. Its really up to the rapper to decide if this is the type of artist he wants to be. And that decision becomes easier when they see all that cash that's to be made by making songs for partying.


    Back in the day, rappers weren't making that much money for a reason. Because it wasn't mainstream. Not cause they sucked. Today its the other way around.

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    Originally Posted by SLY1984
    Its cool to hear all the different points that are being made. Point of views that explain how rap has devolved throughout the years.

    Prince and Akamu, what I got from what you guys were saying was that rap music aint what it used to be, and how y'all had the option to listen to the classic joints. But a lot of the kids these days don't have that option because they don't know about the music you guys know about. Same goes for these new pop rappers. Most of them are not influenced by the great MC's of the early 90's because they were not exposed to good music.


    The first time I heard Illmatic in its entirety was in 2002, my freshman year of college. And it was because I was first discovering all this great music from a decade ago. Nobody said to me "here, listen to this". The point I'm getting at is to influence the youth, by showing them that there's actually great music underneath all this bubblegum rap that's out now. Only then will hip-hop/rap music flourish once again.
    Well I gain influence from a lot of different types of music. From rap/hip hop I'd have to say it's always been music I would play when I wanted to forget about things, in saying that it has influenced me to be tough under serious circumstances.

    From club tracks to just plain degrading stuff, one of the few rappers I didn't mind doing that was the down south rapper "Lil John". That's his specialty, he's always been known for that and said it himself he makes music to make people want to rock the fucc out in the club. I'm fine with that cause he does a good job at it, came out with a lot of stuff that I played a lot and he's hilarious.

    It's jus that a majority of rappers will try and use that formula to propell their careers that makes it annoying. But even so there still some artists you don't hear about that come out with powerful stuff, example that I like to use "Paris"

    It's whatever, as long as people like and buy into the garbage that souljaboy and others like him produce, that's the kinda music we will hear-

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    speaking of how hip-hop is going downhill, with all the fake ****

    other then Jay-z and Nas(cause they legends and still nice)

    this dude is the best dudes gonna blow up(no homo), and he's real





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    Originally Posted by Akamu
    Well I gain influence from a lot of different types of music. From rap/hip hop I'd have to say it's always been music I would play when I wanted to forget about things, in saying that it has influenced me to be tough under serious circumstances.

    From club tracks to just plain degrading stuff, one of the few rappers I didn't mind doing that was the down south rapper "Lil John". That's his specialty, he's always been known for that and said it himself he makes music to make people want to rock the fucc out in the club. I'm fine with that cause he does a good job at it, came out with a lot of stuff that I played a lot and he's hilarious.

    It's jus that a majority of rappers will try and use that formula to propell their careers that makes it annoying. But even so there still some artists you don't hear about that come out with powerful stuff, example that I like to use "Paris"

    It's whatever, as long as people like and buy into the garbage that souljaboy and others like him produce, that's the kinda music we will hear-


    Yea I don't mind listening to songs that are party tracks. Its just that when that's all people listen to, it kills your mind. It makes you more ignorant and you're not as open to other types of music. I also listen to reggaton yet I'm not blasting it all day everyday. Only oldschool stuff.

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    i like a good party track like, Low by Flo-Rida, Akon joints, etc they nice to get loose to on the dance floor(no homo)

    but some of the best are old-school

    Party Up-DMX

    Hypnotize-Notorious B.I.G

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    Originally Posted by DaTPRiNCE
    i like a good party track like, Low by Flo-Rida, Akon joints, etc they nice to get loose to on the dance floor(no homo)

    but some of the best are old-school

    Party Up-DMX

    Hypnotize-Notorious B.I.G
    Yea, I agree. The old school rappers that were doing party tracks were more well-rounded artists. Artists that people respected. These new guys not so much

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    all you need is a song with a catchy beat and chorus, ****ty verses and add a nice dance to it and you got yourself a hit song my friend

    a la "soulja boy"...

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    Originally Posted by DaTPRiNCE
    all you need is a song with a catchy beat and chorus, ****ty verses and add a nice dance to it and you got yourself a hit song my friend

    a la "soulja boy"...
    Of course, bro. but are they that stupid to not realize that they won't last as long because they're one-dimensional?

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    i think soulja boy knows that loll, i still remember when Ice-T called out soulja boy he told you aint ****, cant rap your music suck and your a disgrace, and Ice-T's a legend

    all soulja could say you old man, lmao its pretty funny actually

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