Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Christmas question?

  1. #1
    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    5,484
    Rep Power
    14

    Default Christmas question?

    Why do people say Xmas?

    I mean if you want to disrespect anyone who believes in Christ, say "have a merry Xmas!"

    Since when do people feel it is okay to cross out the person that should be glorified during that specific day?!?! It makes no sense to me and people over look it as if it's not important.

    Can someone answer this for me without being a hater?

  2. #2
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    28
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    for Greek, "chi" and that is "X"

  3. #3
    Huge Member smokes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,227
    Rep Power
    19

    Default

    I think its just shorthand, I don't know where it originates but as far as I know it's just that.

    I've used it a few times and by no means is it intended disrespectfully.

  4. #4
    Hannibal Lecter TR1LL10N's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Dark side of the Moon
    Posts
    2,743
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    Xmas hasn't been about Jesus for decades. It's a last minute push to sure up sales figures for the year and nothing more...bah humbug! (jking)

  5. #5
    Moderator
    CoolClyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Bronx
    Posts
    2,493
    Rep Power
    20

    Default

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    Usage of X for Christ in ancient languages <dl><dd>For the article about the "ΧΡ" symbol see [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].</dd></dl> The word "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]" and its compounds, including "Christmas", have been abbreviated in English for at least the past 1,000 years, long before the modern "Xmas" was commonly used. "Christ" was often written as "XP" or "Xt"; there are references in the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] as far back as AD 1021. This X and P arose as the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] forms of the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] used in ancient abbreviations for Χριστος (Greek for "Christ"), and are still widely seen in many [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] depicting [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]. The [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], an amalgamation of the two Greek letters rendered as [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], is a symbol often used to represent Christ in [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] Christian Churches.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
    The [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], often called the Chi-Rho, is a [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] symbol representing [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].


    The occasionally held belief that the "X" represents the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] on which Christ was crucified also has no basis in fact. [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]'s [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] is X-shaped, but Christ's cross was probably shaped like a T or a . Indeed, X-as-chi was associated with Christ long before X-as-cross could be, since the cross as a Christian symbol developed later. (The Greek letter Chi Χ stood for "Christ" in the ancient Greek [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] ΙΧΘΥΣ [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].) While some see the spelling of Christmas as Xmas a threat, others see it as a way to honor the martyrs. The use of X as an abbreviation for "cross" in modern abbreviated writing (e.g. "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]") may have reinforced this assumption.
    In ancient Christian art, χ and χρ are abbreviations for Christ's name.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> In many manuscripts of the New Testament and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], X is an abbreviation for Christos, as is XC (the first and last letters in Greek, using the lunate [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]); compare IC for [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] in Greek.
    [[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]] Usage in English

    The Oxford English Dictionary and OED Supplement have cited usages of "X-" or "Xp-" for "Christ-" in 1485 ("Xpian"), 1598 ("Xpian"), and "Xtian" in 1845, 1915 and 1940. It cites "Xtianity" usage in 1634, 1811 and 1966. "Most of the evidence for these words comes from educated Englishmen who knew their Greek," according to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, referring to the OED citations.<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-0" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    In the United Kingdom and among the English, use of "Xmas" is found in a letter from January 13, 1753 (George Woodward to George London: "I find by ye Newsapers that several People have shewed a great Aversion to ye [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]; particularly with regard to ye Observation of Xmas Day").<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] used the term in 1811 ("If you won't come here before Xmas, [...]", letter, September 9, 1811).<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-1" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] used it ("On Xmas Day I breakfasted with Davy", 1801)<sup id="cite_ref-bbc04_2-2" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> as did [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] ("[...] which I hope to get published before Xmas", letter, June 10, 1864). In the United States, [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] also wrote it ("I expect about Xmas a visit", October 11, 1923).<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-2" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    Since at least the late 19th century, "Xmas" has been in use in various other English-language nations. Quotations with the word can be found in texts written in Canada,<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> and the word has been used in Australia,<sup id="cite_ref-ppcgaeu_4-1" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> and in the Caribbean<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage stated that modern use of the term is largely limited to advertisements, headlines and banners, where its conciseness is valued. The association with commerce "has done nothing for its reputation", according to the dictionary.<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-3" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    [[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]] Other uses of "X" for "Chris-"

    The proper names containing the name "Christ" other than aforementioned are rarely abbreviated in this way (e.g. Hayden Xensen for the actor name "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]"). This apparent usage of "X" to spell the syllable "kris" (rather than the sounds "ks") has extended to "xtal" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]", "Xtine" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]" and on [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]' signs "xant" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]"<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> (though these words are not etymologically related to "Christ": "crystal" comes from a Greek word meaning "ice", and "chrysanthemum" comes from Greek words meaning "golden flower", while "Christ" comes from a Greek word meaning "anointed").
    In the 17th and 18th Centuries, "Xene" and "Exene" were common spellings of the given name Christene. [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] has at times gone by the name Xtina (the "t" should not be considered redundant as, as is noted above, "Christ" was often shortened historically to "Xt" not just X).<sup class="noprint Template-Fact" title="This claim needs references to reliable sources from December 2008" style="white-space: nowrap;"></sup>

  6. #6
    Veteran TunerAddict's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,183
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    **** Jesus

  7. #7
    Superstar dre48ny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    681
    Rep Power
    7

    Default

    Originally Posted by TunerAddict
    **** Jesus
    Come on dude no need to write that, no need to disrespect Jesus like that. If you don't believe in him or religion; respect others as they have strong sentiments about this topic.

  8. #8
    Veteran TunerAddict's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,183
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Originally Posted by dre48ny
    Come on dude no need to write that, no need to disrespect Jesus like that. If you don't believe in him or religion; respect others as they have strong sentiments about this topic.
    Then shouldn't you be respecting my belief in ****ing Jesus?

  9. #9
    The One and Only KING~POETIQ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Queens the Foundation
    Posts
    1,807
    Rep Power
    7

    Default

    Originally Posted by TunerAddict
    **** Jesus
    I get real sensitive when *******s talk **** about Jesus.


    So if you're going to be ignorant, then I'm going to be ignorant too:


    **** you tuner and **** your mother.

  10. #10
    Veteran TunerAddict's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,183
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Originally Posted by SLY1984
    I get real sensitive when *******s talk **** about Jesus.


    So if you're going to be ignorant, then I'm going to be ignorant too:


    **** you tuner and **** your mother.
    You fail to understand the contradictory nature of what you're saying.

  11. #11
    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    5,484
    Rep Power
    14

    Default

    Originally Posted by TunerAddict
    **** Jesus
    And if your wrong.....you have no one to blame but yourself.

  12. #12
    Veteran Paul1355's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    5,484
    Rep Power
    14

    Default

    Originally Posted by CoolClyde
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    Usage of X for Christ in ancient languages <dl><dd>For the article about the "ΧΡ" symbol see [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].</dd></dl> The word "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]" and its compounds, including "Christmas", have been abbreviated in English for at least the past 1,000 years, long before the modern "Xmas" was commonly used. "Christ" was often written as "XP" or "Xt"; there are references in the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] as far back as AD 1021. This X and P arose as the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] forms of the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] used in ancient abbreviations for Χριστος (Greek for "Christ"), and are still widely seen in many [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] depicting [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]. The [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], an amalgamation of the two Greek letters rendered as [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], is a symbol often used to represent Christ in [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] Christian Churches.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
    The [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], often called the Chi-Rho, is a [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] symbol representing [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].


    The occasionally held belief that the "X" represents the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] on which Christ was crucified also has no basis in fact. [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]'s [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] is X-shaped, but Christ's cross was probably shaped like a T or a . Indeed, X-as-chi was associated with Christ long before X-as-cross could be, since the cross as a Christian symbol developed later. (The Greek letter Chi Χ stood for "Christ" in the ancient Greek [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] ΙΧΘΥΣ [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].) While some see the spelling of Christmas as Xmas a threat, others see it as a way to honor the martyrs. The use of X as an abbreviation for "cross" in modern abbreviated writing (e.g. "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]") may have reinforced this assumption.
    In ancient Christian art, χ and χρ are abbreviations for Christ's name.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> In many manuscripts of the New Testament and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], X is an abbreviation for Christos, as is XC (the first and last letters in Greek, using the lunate [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]); compare IC for [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] in Greek.
    [[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]] Usage in English

    The Oxford English Dictionary and OED Supplement have cited usages of "X-" or "Xp-" for "Christ-" in 1485 ("Xpian"), 1598 ("Xpian"), and "Xtian" in 1845, 1915 and 1940. It cites "Xtianity" usage in 1634, 1811 and 1966. "Most of the evidence for these words comes from educated Englishmen who knew their Greek," according to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, referring to the OED citations.<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-0" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    In the United Kingdom and among the English, use of "Xmas" is found in a letter from January 13, 1753 (George Woodward to George London: "I find by ye Newsapers that several People have shewed a great Aversion to ye [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]; particularly with regard to ye Observation of Xmas Day").<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] used the term in 1811 ("If you won't come here before Xmas, [...]", letter, September 9, 1811).<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-1" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] used it ("On Xmas Day I breakfasted with Davy", 1801)<sup id="cite_ref-bbc04_2-2" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> as did [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] ("[...] which I hope to get published before Xmas", letter, June 10, 1864). In the United States, [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] also wrote it ("I expect about Xmas a visit", October 11, 1923).<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-2" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    Since at least the late 19th century, "Xmas" has been in use in various other English-language nations. Quotations with the word can be found in texts written in Canada,<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> and the word has been used in Australia,<sup id="cite_ref-ppcgaeu_4-1" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> and in the Caribbean<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage stated that modern use of the term is largely limited to advertisements, headlines and banners, where its conciseness is valued. The association with commerce "has done nothing for its reputation", according to the dictionary.<sup id="cite_ref-mwdeu_9-3" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup>
    [[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]] Other uses of "X" for "Chris-"

    The proper names containing the name "Christ" other than aforementioned are rarely abbreviated in this way (e.g. Hayden Xensen for the actor name "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]"). This apparent usage of "X" to spell the syllable "kris" (rather than the sounds "ks") has extended to "xtal" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]", "Xtine" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]" and on [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]' signs "xant" for "[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]"<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]</sup> (though these words are not etymologically related to "Christ": "crystal" comes from a Greek word meaning "ice", and "chrysanthemum" comes from Greek words meaning "golden flower", while "Christ" comes from a Greek word meaning "anointed").
    In the 17th and 18th Centuries, "Xene" and "Exene" were common spellings of the given name Christene. [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] has at times gone by the name Xtina (the "t" should not be considered redundant as, as is noted above, "Christ" was often shortened historically to "Xt" not just X).<sup class="noprint Template-Fact" title="This claim needs references to reliable sources from December 2008" style="white-space: nowrap;"></sup>
    thanks for the history.

    It makes sense now hearing all of that but im sure there might be other reasons.

    Christmas sounds better.

  13. #13
    Enlightened OGKnickfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    944
    Rep Power
    7

    Default

    Originally Posted by TunerAddict
    **** Jesus

    I'm probably an agnostic, and I don't like it when Christians, or any other religion's members, try to push their beliefs on me (my main problem with them). But to go out of your way to build your ego, by insulting a figure important to millions, is inexcusable.

    What an intelligent person would say is 'f*ck us,' because we're all screwed up, regardless of religious, political or ideological membership (that includes yours). Until we work to feel, for every living thing, we'll continue to be destructive. Believing or not, in this or that, does not mean you're there.

    In fact, the conflict you seem to want to create is the sort of negative energy that causes tragedy in the world, because somebody, hopefully, beats the pants off of a jerk like you.

    Think on that, while you pat yourself on your self-righteous back. PEACE!
    Last edited by OGKnickfan; Dec 29, 2009 at 06:12.

  14. #14
    Veteran TunerAddict's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,183
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Originally Posted by OGKnickfan
    I'm probably an agnostic, and I don't like it when Christians, or any other religion's members, try to push their beliefs on me (my main problem with them). But to go out of your way to build your ego, by insulting a figure important to millions, is inexcusable.

    What an intelligent person would say is 'f*ck us,' because we're all screwed up, regardless of religious, political or ideological membership (that includes yours). Until we work to feel, for every living thing, we'll continue to be destructive. Believing or not, in this or that, does not mean you're there.

    In fact, the conflict you seem to want to create is the sort of negative energy that causes tragedy in the world, because somebody, hopefully, beats the pants off of a jerk like you.

    Think on that, while you pat yourself on your self-righteous back. PEACE!
    Mate, you are wayyyyyyyyy out there.

    Self righteous? None of you know my motives. Who the **** is to say that I said that for any particular reason? No one.

    Gotta get over yourself.

  15. #15
    Superstar dre48ny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    681
    Rep Power
    7

    Default

    Originally Posted by TunerAddict
    Then shouldn't you be respecting my belief in ****ing Jesus?
    I do respect your belief thats why i didn't curse at you. You are free to voice your opinion, but there are better ways to do it specially on a topic like this one. This is not the Knicks we are referring to on this thread, come on bro.

Similar Threads

  1. **** Christmas
    By metrocard in forum Hangout
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Dec 26, 2009, 22:35
  2. Official 2009 Christmas Thread
    By KING~POETIQ in forum Hangout
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Dec 24, 2009, 15:27
  3. My Question was on the Mike Dantoni Show last night!
    By New New York in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Dec 07, 2009, 20:30
  4. Walsh Transcript
    By Crazy⑧s in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jun 23, 2009, 14:20
  5. Countdown to Christmas.
    By NYKnicks15 in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Nov 19, 2007, 12:05

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •