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    Default Buddhist Monks use Hip hop and alcohol to attract followers..

    Buddhist monks use hip hop, alcohol to attract followers

    By Kyung Lah, CNNcnnAuthor = "By Kyung Lah, CNN";
    if(location.hostname.indexOf( 'edition.' ) > -1) {document.write('January 22, 2010 -- Updated 0456 GMT (1256 HKT)');} else {document.write('January 21, 2010 11:56 p.m. EST');}January 21, 2010 11:56 p.m. EST

    var clickExpire = "-1"; Monk Zenshin serves up ****tails with Buddhism at the "Monk Bar."








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    • Buddhist monks take different approaches to reach young
    • One monk hosts hip hop shows at his temple
    • Another monk uses his bar to talk about Buddhism
    • Cultural affairs agency: Hundreds of temples close yearly


    Tokyo, Japan (CNN) -- Outside the 400-year-old Kyoouji Temple, Kansho Tagai, dressed in his traditional monk robes, paused and began a sutra. He bobbed his head and then broke into a lyrical rap.
    "This is an old, old story, a fantasy and longing cosmology. Hey, hey, what's the story about? It's about the Buddha, yo. Hey brother, listen carefully! You got it? No? You don't? Okay, baby, no problem."
    Tagai, or Mr. Happiness, as he prefers to be called, is delivering an ancient message to a hip hop beat. The monk hosts hip hop shows at his temple, drawing young people to a place that is traditionally filled with the elderly. His hip hop message is so popular that twice as many people now visit his temple.
    "Buddha's doctrine is a treasure for us," Tagai said. "But we're not able to convey his wisdom to the people if we only stick with the old ways. So I try to use a new way to spread Buddha's doctrine. I want to spread Buddhism to the young by using the language they easily understand. Buddhism itself hasn't changed. It's just the way it's presented."
    The ancient religion is in crisis, Tagai said, because monks are not reaching the young with a message that brings spiritual relief. The numbers support his fears. Japan is home to 75,000 temples, but those numbers are on the decline. The Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs reports that since 2000, hundreds of temples have closed every year.
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    Younger monks like Tagai are taking matters into their own hands, by trying to attract a new generation of Buddhists.
    At the Monk Bar in Shinjuku, Zenshin Fujioka shakes up the house special. He pours a drink layered in red, yellow and pink, which he calls "heaven." His other special of the night is "hell," a spicy vodka mix that sticks with you for hours.
    Never mind that Zenshin is a monk. Sutras are shaken and stirred at the Monk Bar.
    "There's this image that monks sit deep in a mountain, training alone," Zenshin said. "But it's important that we come down into the secular world and live in modern society. An altar doesn't mean you have a temple. A temple is a place where people follow the faith and Buddha."
    "This place is a temple," Zenshin said, wiping liquor off the bar.
    To those who call the venue a gimmick, he said, "please visit my bar before judging."
    As the bar filled with smoke and patrons one evening, Zenshin paused and rang his bell. The ancient sutras flowed forth, as customers listened.
    Hardly anyone can follow the ancient Buddhist text, a Japanese that's so complicated, only monks are readily able to understand it. But Zenshin said the real religion happens as he pours the drinks, talking to his guests about their problems and soothing with the Buddhist texts.
    "Buddhism for [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] is a religion you normally only experience at funerals," said patron Naoyuki Osano, who comes to the bar twice a week. "But the Buddhist philosophy is wonderful. It's great to have a place like this for us to learn about Buddhism."

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    hahaha! why didn't that work for me?

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    Enlightened OGKnickfan's Avatar
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    This post is trash: it essentially makes it seem as if rapping and alcohol have become a part of Buddhist practice.

    And talk about hypocrisy. Your church, the Jehovah's Witnesses, has been responsible for numerous instances of sexual abuse: both heterosexual and homosexual. Your church has also assisted people in hiding children from relatives, usually one of their two parents, as a result of the parent having become an "apostate," i.e., wised up to the scam you're running.

    And so what if one Buddhist bar serves alcohol and allows a monk to rap? Did you ever consider that Buddhism is not as controlling and mindless as what you follow?

    I'll use your own book to finish you:

    Matthew 7:5: "You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye."

    How about you deal with your church enabling, and nourishing, future rapists and pedophiles, before you attack a monk for running a Buddhist bar? Hypocrisy, at its fullest.

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    Member milchshake's Avatar
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    religion - the greatest narcotic.

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    Originally Posted by OGKnickfan
    This post is trash: it essentially makes it seem as if rapping and alcohol have become a part of Buddhist practice.

    And talk about hypocrisy. Your church, the Jehovah's Witnesses, has been responsible for numerous instances of sexual abuse: both heterosexual and homosexual. Your church has also assisted people in hiding children from relatives, usually one of their two parents, as a result of the parent having become an "apostate," i.e., wised up to the scam you're running.

    And so what if one Buddhist bar serves alcohol and allows a monk to rap? Did you ever consider that Buddhism is not as controlling and mindless as what you follow?

    I'll use your own book to finish you:

    Matthew 7:5: "You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye."

    How about you deal with your church enabling, and nourishing, future rapists and pedophiles, before you attack a monk for running a Buddhist bar? Hypocrisy, at its fullest.

    As usual, you missed the point. Buddhism is considered a "PURE" way to enlightenment by the masses. Well educated, or just self supposed know it alls. How will getting people drunk, and rapping, help enlighten anyone?

    And please... PLEASE, stop with the hypocrisy thing. Jehovah's witnesses do not claim to be a perfect people by any stretch of the imagination. They, like all other imperfect people, WILL MAKE MISTAKES. Even vile ones. However, as a whole, Jehovah's witnesses are probably the most invisible religious group of people on the planet. Except on sat morning's when we're knocking on doors.

    The experiences you have brought up, are more than likely situations you have been told of by close friends or associates. Do not try and make it seem as if Jehovah's people are running around in complete opposition of his laws and principles. Because you will look like a fool. When a person becomes a Jehovah's witness, they are well aware of what it means, and what kind of life they must carry on. Therefore, if someone steps over the line, there is a very good chance they will no longer qualify to be a Jehovah's witness. Which explains why you rarely see or hear anything negative about one. Because they get disfellowshipped, which means they are no longer considered a Jehovah's witness.


    And say whatever you will about Jehovah's witnesses, but give credit where it is due. We do not change God's laws to fit our views. We do not have happy hour at the Kingdom hall, or pack Patron in our briefcases so we can bring in more people as we go door knocking. We just try to do the will of God to the best of each and every individual's ability.

    Meanwhile, the other major religions keep changing with the times. This too was prophesied about. It's just crazy seeing it actually come to fruition. Though I never doubted it would.

    Good day!

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    Enlightened OGKnickfan's Avatar
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    So, if you don't claim to be perfect, work on yourself and quit pointing at others. As for drinking and rapping Buddhist monks, if it's done with no purpose, you would be right. If it is done with the intent of teaching people how to live better lives, it makes sense.

    The fact is that many religious groups talk to people, without teaching them a thing. Your group I consider to be one of those, because it emphasizes rules, at the expense of real values and principles, which go beyond rules and into the realm of contemplation of one's actions and the effect of those on others.

    Lastly, in regard to Buddhist Monks using alcohol and hip-hop to attract followers, the phrase is misleading. The article you posted involves one Buddhist monk, from a particular sect, in a particular country: Japan.

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