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quiggle
Mar 13, 2012, 15:39
thanks one last question is the ab wheel better then sit up crunches or should you still do those also (do they target different areas)

iSaYughh
Mar 13, 2012, 16:38
thanks one last question is the ab wheel better then sit up crunches or should you still do those also (do they target different areas)

Put simply: it is a superior exercise. It targets more of your core (which is a surprisingly expansive, layered musculature), is more functional (by that I mean the specific movement translates better to sport-specific function), and offers greater degrees of potential challenge and stimulus.

If you are a novice lifter, almost any stimulus will give you good results. It's why the before/afters for a lot of products are ridiculous, or why people get deluded into thinking what they were doing as a magic potion. Lifting a 6 pack will improve bicep and general arm strength in many.

Almost any time new stimulus is introduced, you will reap nice results, especially if you are a novice lifter (note: you can be great at a sport, in nice shape etc, and still be a novice when it comes to lifting and a linear progression exercise model).

Personally, I still do crunches as a finisher to some core workout routines -- eg, 50 bicycle kick crunches at the very end, as a burnout/finisher.

I do them more for mental toughness purposes, and for the variety which I enjoy.

Sit up can be good; they are often done to good effect with added resistance, since a lot of core routines are done bodyweight, being able to add rather heavy weight/resistance to a movement is good -- more variety, new stimulus.

Long answer to your question....but you should definitely do more than just ab wheel roll outs. If you just do ab wheel roll outs your core will receive a big overall improvement,

but in time, you will simply become an ab wheel specialist, and your growth/progression will stall to a greater degree than need be.

I'd pick a handful of different, quality core exercises and make circuits out of them -- you perform 3-5 exercises, rest a minute or so, and do 3 sets, eg.

It'll be easy to make the routines progressively more difficult and suited to your needs and goals, starting with something novice, and working up.

EDIT -- what you want to get out of your fitness matters most, too. if you wanna be an all-around animal, or if you have a specific sport or task in mind, etc. Most people are too weak, though, I'll say that with 100% confidence...even ppl who are very well conditioned and reasonably strong, hit major walls and fall short of their overall potential and progression bc they lack a true stength base.

quiggle
Mar 13, 2012, 17:51
Put simply: it is a superior exercise. It targets more of your core (which is a surprisingly expansive, layered musculature), is more functional (by that I mean the specific movement translates better to sport-specific function), and offers greater degrees of potential challenge and stimulus.

If you are a novice lifter, almost any stimulus will give you good results. It's why the before/afters for a lot of products are ridiculous, or why people get deluded into thinking what they were doing as a magic potion. Lifting a 6 pack will improve bicep and general arm strength in many.

Almost any time new stimulus is introduced, you will reap nice results, especially if you are a novice lifter (note: you can be great at a sport, in nice shape etc, and still be a novice when it comes to lifting and a linear progression exercise model).

Personally, I still do crunches as a finisher to some core workout routines -- eg, 50 bicycle kick crunches at the very end, as a burnout/finisher.

I do them more for mental toughness purposes, and for the variety which I enjoy.

Sit up can be good; they are often done to good effect with added resistance, since a lot of core routines are done bodyweight, being able to add rather heavy weight/resistance to a movement is good -- more variety, new stimulus.

Long answer to your question....but you should definitely do more than just ab wheel roll outs. If you just do ab wheel roll outs your core will receive a big overall improvement,

but in time, you will simply become an ab wheel specialist, and your growth/progression will stall to a greater degree than need be.

I'd pick a handful of different, quality core exercises and make circuits out of them -- you perform 3-5 exercises, rest a minute or so, and do 3 sets, eg.

It'll be easy to make the routines progressively more difficult and suited to your needs and goals, starting with something novice, and working up.

EDIT -- what you want to get out of your fitness matters most, too. if you wanna be an all-around animal, or if you have a specific sport or task in mind, etc. Most people are too weak, though, I'll say that with 100% confidence...even ppl who are very well conditioned and reasonably strong, hit major walls and fall short of their overall potential and progression bc they lack a true stength base.

thanks appreciate the advice, are there other exercise equipment that looks cheap but can give very good exercise like ab wheel? i cant do jump rope in my place because my neighbors downstairs complain of the noise

iSaYughh
Mar 13, 2012, 18:20
Np man.

Equipment hmm....

Ab Wheel
Exercise Mat or two, ideally a big one.
Pullup/Pushup bar (ones that mount to a door....can get them cheap off ebay or craigslist, and they work quite well).
Resistance Bands (can get pretty heavy ones, and not pricy if you get used)

Look into "burpees" for an exercise, one legged squats, pushup and pullup variatins, stuff you can do w/ the resistance bands, etc.

"Never Gymless" is a really good book too for "weight free" exercise programs. Prolly worth investing in that book, IMO...or try to find the exercises/programs in it somehow.

p0nder
Mar 14, 2012, 09:47
Best fitness investment I made was a gym membership....

but the #2 investment was a pullup bar that mounts in any standard door frame. Cost me $30 at walmart and I just left it in the door all the time. Bang out a few pull ups every other day and you will see a big difference in your arms, sholders and back. The bar can also be placed on the ground and used for push-up/dips. Between all of that it's pretty much a full upperbody workout in one piece of equipment. Resistance bands might be a good investment for someone that has difficulty doing 1 pull-up. I started out that way tho and with consistent work on the pull-up bar I can now do 10 reps unassisted.

Burpee's are a great conditioning exercise. Do as many as you can in a minute then take a breather and go again. "Pistols" (one legged squats) are great for leg strength. If you have difficulty with them start off with body weight squats then put a chair behind you and rest one leg's toes on that and squat with the other. eventually working your way to the pistol.

Along with the ab wheel you are looking at you can have a full body workout at home for well under $50. I just prefer going to the gym because I like to move big weights and use their cardio equipment. It also gets me out of the office for an hour and all of that helps with motivation to work out, which was my biggest issue with working out at home. Good luck with it!

quiggle
Mar 14, 2012, 10:33
Np man.

Equipment hmm....

Ab Wheel
Exercise Mat or two, ideally a big one.
Pullup/Pushup bar (ones that mount to a door....can get them cheap off ebay or craigslist, and they work quite well).
Resistance Bands (can get pretty heavy ones, and not pricy if you get used)

Look into "burpees" for an exercise, one legged squats, pushup and pullup variatins, stuff you can do w/ the resistance bands, etc.

"Never Gymless" is a really good book too for "weight free" exercise programs. Prolly worth investing in that book, IMO...or try to find the exercises/programs in it somehow.

thanks again and for the book recommendation, I read Arnold Swartzenggers book hoping for inspiration and didnt get it so maybe this one will. also do exercise bikes work or are they just fluff

iSaYughh
Mar 14, 2012, 18:44
thanks again and for the book recommendation, I read Arnold Swartzenggers book hoping for inspiration and didnt get it so maybe this one will. also do exercise bikes work or are they just fluff

Bikes are fine. Don't overthink things too much, ya know -- paralysis by analysis.

Pretty much anything is good if you train hard (most important), and smart (which I'll define as not just doing the same thing over and over, but always making sure you are making some form of progress, which you can track through any sort of performance metric).

If you just want general fitness, as it seems, the book "Never Gymless" is probably the best investment you could make. It includes a really good, easy to follow 50day program, and tons of well defined exercises, and prior to that language written so many can understand as to why you do what you do (to help you think for yourself ultimately when it comes to exercise).

CoolClyde
Mar 15, 2012, 00:24
this is a cool thread, props to fitness-conscious KO posters!

metrocard
Mar 16, 2012, 11:23
May not be related to fitness but I got my first amatuer fight of the year this Saturday ill let you guys know how I do. So far my amatuer record is (1-0)

CoolClyde
Mar 21, 2012, 11:27
May not be related to fitness but I got my first amatuer fight of the year this Saturday ill let you guys know how I do. So far my amatuer record is (1-0)

good luck Metro! is it in the Bronx? can fellow KO posters come by to cheer you on?

iSaYughh
Mar 21, 2012, 14:47
good luck Metro! is it in the Bronx? can fellow KO posters come by to cheer you on?

I think he already had it? idk.....gl if not!It takes legit balls to step into the ring.

iSaYughh
Mar 21, 2012, 14:53
Btw, just to add an update to this thread: after a full 6month layoff due to sports injury, I'm back at the gym.

Doing a program that I would recommend above pretty much anything else out there for anyone who wants/needs to gain a legit base of strength, and size.

Starting weight for me is 215 (guesstimated bf% 18, maybe as high as 20, height 6ft flat). 3month goal: 240 weight, w/o gaining more than 5% bf, ideally only 2-3%.

Big part of the program (at least insofar as going for max strength gains and trying to put on weight) is that I'll be drinking a gallon of whole milk every day for the 3months.

After that, I'm dropping the milk, but staying on a similar strength program (but jacking up the general difficulty and complexity to continue linear strength gains for another month or so), while slowly starting to shed a bit of weight and getting my conditioning base back.

Following that, it's back to my usual hybrid fight/sport slanted programming....heavy conditioning and a mix of strength exercises. Hopefully end my weight/body composition back at 220, maybe all the way back to 215 even.

RunningJumper
Mar 23, 2012, 22:14
Reached my goal today. I did 100 squats. First set 12, second set 16, third set 72. While I was at it I did 112 consecutive sit-ups after, also a new record.

After those squats I got a throbbing headache again, which lasted about twenty something minutes. Eventually I felt like I was gonna throw up, but I didn't, felt good, and was able to eat dinner.

Don't think I'll be doing that many squats again anytime soon.

metrocard
Mar 25, 2012, 08:25
hey Cool, would of def sent out an invite, but the fight was in Massenna NY, 7 hours away from the boogie down.

A lot of controversy in my first fight. Landed more jabs and power shots, but got the loss decision. Learning experience. My trainer is the Isiah Thomas of trainers, I didn't get time to warm up nor wasn't ready when my bout began (my trainer was unaware of when it was going to start). Also my trainer didn't do his research and they matched me in the 178lb weight class against a guy who was 8-0 with years of experience.

I'm only 165 lbs, and thats always been the weight class I fight at...they tipped the scales and claimed I weight 167lbs.


I was on the attack in the first round, and started countering him in the second round. Inexperienced fighters don’t start throwing until their opponents throw first. The guy I face was 6"2 and well over 190lbs, but lacked stamina and any real power. But I knew I had to throw a lot of shots to even get close to the scorecards. I had the fight won, but I guess the judges didn't count my straight right counters to the score card.

Well even the guy I faced told me he didn't won that fight.

Throughout all the bull****, I got a medal for my efforts.
http://i55.twitgoo.com/nzrbq1.jpg


I can't wait to get back into the ring. I have so much work to do. I love this journey. Determined to be the best... and better than that. I have a lot of power. Now I will work to skill and perfect it to efficient utilization.

Sprewell-Houston
Mar 27, 2012, 14:53
hey Cool, would of def sent out an invite, but the fight was in Massenna NY, 7 hours away from the boogie down.

A lot of controversy in my first fight. Landed more jabs and power shots, but got the loss decision. Learning experience. My trainer is the Isiah Thomas of trainers, I didn't get time to warm up nor wasn't ready when my bout began (my trainer was unaware of when it was going to start). Also my trainer didn't do his research and they matched me in the 178lb weight class against a guy who was 8-0 with years of experience.

I'm only 165 lbs, and thats always been the weight class I fight at...they tipped the scales and claimed I weight 167lbs.


I was on the attack in the first round, and started countering him in the second round. Inexperienced fighters don’t start throwing until their opponents throw first. The guy I face was 6"2 and well over 190lbs, but lacked stamina and any real power. But I knew I had to throw a lot of shots to even get close to the scorecards. I had the fight won, but I guess the judges didn't count my straight right counters to the score card.

Well even the guy I faced told me he didn't won that fight.

Throughout all the bull****, I got a medal for my efforts.
http://i55.twitgoo.com/nzrbq1.jpg


I can't wait to get back into the ring. I have so much work to do. I love this journey. Determined to be the best... and better than that. I have a lot of power. Now I will work to skill and perfect it to efficient utilization.


Damn bro sounds like they robbed you!

F em!

Get a good trainer and you'll be on the winning side pretty soon by the look of it.

Keep up the good effort, I have a weak spot for boxers, did a little boxing myself 4 years ago, but no fights just practice.

metrocard
Mar 27, 2012, 19:35
I got two potential fights coming up in April, I got a new trainer too...but I may do a fight with my old trainer @ 165 lbs on April 13th and go down to 152 to fight on the 27th with my new trainer.

Spre, thank you for the love...I'm giving this sport everything I got.

p0nder
Mar 29, 2012, 09:14
RunningJumper: I think you would find your squatting much more effective if you added weight to it and cut down the reps. Doing 100 bodyweight squats is probably a good cardio workout and may build some endurance strength but if you are looking to build muscle/strength/explosiveness (vertical jump) I really gotta recommend adding weights.

If you don't have much weight available, two bags filled with canned good in each hand will do. You may also want to consider lunges. Check them out on youtube.

Props for hitting the squats though. You have no idea how many people I know that just flat out don't workout their lower body at all. Squats are one of the single best motions you can do for your health.

p0nder
Mar 29, 2012, 09:15
Props to metro for good efforts in his boxing career. I know a lot of guys that are into ball also are into boxing. I don't know what the correlation is but It seems boxing and ball go hand in hand. Maybe cause there's just so many time you wanna knock a motha****a out on the court. :D

RunningJumper
Apr 01, 2012, 14:26
RunningJumper: I think you would find your squatting much more effective if you added weight to it and cut down the reps. Doing 100 bodyweight squats is probably a good cardio workout and may build some endurance strength but if you are looking to build muscle/strength/explosiveness (vertical jump) I really gotta recommend adding weights.

If you don't have much weight available, two bags filled with canned good in each hand will do. You may also want to consider lunges. Check them out on youtube.

Props for hitting the squats though. You have no idea how many people I know that just flat out don't workout their lower body at all. Squats are one of the single best motions you can do for your health.
Thanks for the advice. I'll definitely look into that stuff including the lunges (actually have done some in the summer I think). I'm not surprised more weight/less reps would be more effective, but I still loved the accomplishment of knowing how much I wanted to do, and fighting through that scary amount.

I haven't done that much exercise since the day of my goal because I've been busy (it's better anyway since my head still throbbed from not that much exercise). I'll be getting back to my usual workouts hopefully this week.

Not only is leg exercises great for your health, I also don't want thin legs. I don't get why anyone would focus so much on their upper body size, and have thin legs, unless they like the look

iSaYughh
Apr 01, 2012, 19:22
^^ high rep work (like RJ's bw squats) is also very good for the mind. Good for building mental strength. Personally, I wouldn't make it a regular part of my training, but I often use "finishers": end of workout, I'll skip rope for a minute or two as fast as ****ing possible. Or hold a pair of heavy ass dumbells and just hold them till i gotta drop them.

Same time, 20reps of weighted squats is a HELLUVA tough workout that will tax your lungs and mind like almost nothing else.

It depends on goals, but I'd agree w Ponder that if you have access...not much beats linear progressive resistance training -- your weights go up, you know you're getting stronger (and prone to gaining size if you eat enough).

Anyway, i bought my first pair of basketball kicks today (outside of when i was young). Adidas' Crazy Lights....just found out they are for "hardcourt only" WTF :boohoo: I hope I don't have to return them.

Also got a pair of Adipure Trainers...basically like being totally barefoot. Look weird, but heard sick **** about them...especially for running and gym training...but apply to any sport since they strengthen oft injured **** like your ankles.

metrocard
Jun 01, 2012, 06:30
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/198245_466313803395522_100000507204512_1743034_187 8378502_n.jpg

1100 lbs.

I'm 159 right now btw, trying to get to 155lbs

orangeblobman
Jun 04, 2012, 11:25
I was just gonna come on and post a thread on something like this, was gonna call it physical activity or whatever; wanted to see what other members do to stay fit.

So it's cool that I found this thread.

Metro, machines suck, you need the freeweights.

Gang, check out my power rack that I built last year. I hit a 1 rep max of 240 earlier this year before developing a stress fracture in my left shin (from basketball).

Now I'm starting squatting again.

http://oi52.tinypic.com/hx6k9d.jpg

NYNYK
Jun 06, 2012, 15:12
Nice to know we got fighters on here...do some Muay Thai and a lil bit of MMA myself, no competing tho, maybe someday.

What do u think about cross fit workouts btw? just started it last week and been getting killed every week with the workouts. Just want to increase my overall athletic ability and I've heard good and bad about it.

p0nder
Jun 25, 2012, 14:52
Metro: That's really impressive weight especially at your BW of 160ish. Even if it is in the leg press. I was talking to a guy today that does a ton of lifting, deadlifts 600lbs easy. He mentioned that he has switched from squats to leg press (+other movements) because of the stress on the joints and that he can increase the weight more safely on the leg press. I personally want to be squatting 1.5x my BW before I will move off of the squats though.

NYNYK: Cross fit is a really great cardio/resistance program. it's not going to get you bench pressing the most or increasing your size but as for athletic ability and transference to sports it's got a lot of supporters. Personally I find that crossfit tends to encourage the breakdown of form and the development of bad habits around those form cheats. But as far as a program to drop fat and increase cardiovascular ability crossfit will be great. There are possibly other programs out there that may be better for you. depends on goals, sports of choice, etc.

Orangeblobman: That's really fine workmanship on the power rack! If i could make one of those (and had the space for it) I would probably be able to cancel my gym membership. Good luck getting back into it.

Also guys, i participate in a site called fitocracy, where i log my workouts and get points/acheivments for breaking milestones in thegym and on the court. If you interested in joining up use this invite: http://ftcy.me/cZyiXs I can follow u and we can talk more about fitness there. Lots of helpful support there as well. I hope Rady doesn't mind me posting this here. I've found it a huge help to my fitness goals to have a support system like this.

orangeblobman
Jun 26, 2012, 06:01
Orangeblobman: That's really fine workmanship on the power rack! If i could make one of those (and had the space for it) I would probably be able to cancel my gym membership. Good luck getting back into it.



Thanks, man! It's been about a year now since I built it and it went through its first winter, had a summer, now a summer again and it's really settling in, getting better with age.

Squats are going great I started pretty low but I'm doing them with much more intensity, much more control, keeping abs really tight. Progressing nicely should be around 200 soon.

I love the squat but it's becoming clear to me that my lift is the deadlift. I'm 6'3" with long arms, great deadlift build, so that's where I will put a lot of work in.

1.5bw squat is also my goal.

iSaYughh
Jul 02, 2012, 17:09
I was just gonna come on and post a thread on something like this, was gonna call it physical activity or whatever; wanted to see what other members do to stay fit.

So it's cool that I found this thread.

Metro, machines suck, you need the freeweights.

Gang, check out my power rack that I built last year. I hit a 1 rep max of 240 earlier this year before developing a stress fracture in my left shin (from basketball).

Now I'm starting squatting again.

http://oi52.tinypic.com/hx6k9d.jpg

That's a sweet power rack.

I'm not big on machines myself, but that's still an impressive amount of weight to move no matter how you slice it -- and plenty of superb athletes use machines, so.....all depends on the person, and situation. I'm not a hardliner anymore, tho I personally haven't touched a machine outside of a rower in over a year...but at end of day, results are results.

I did a 3-month bulking cycle that ended last month. Gallon of whole milk a day, zero cardio outside of some biking and walking in nyc, and only 3 workouts/week, with 5 exercises in total spread throughout them.

Went from 200 to 225, with a pretty good ratio of muscle to fat gain. Strength -- through the ****ing roof.

Squat
Deadlift
Pullups
Power cleans
Bench
Shoulder press

All sky rocketed.

Just switched back to more fight-based fitness, where I'll shed a ton of fat too.

Ross Enamait based training. Highly rec him, especially for athletes/boxers....but for anyone really. Great source of truth and information, and his programs are a lot of fun (crossfit style, but more flexibible and adaptive to your goals).

p0nder
Jul 09, 2012, 08:53
Sorry if I missed it isayughh, but are you training for MMA/boxing? just curious. I trained in wing chun kung fu for years and later did Jeet Kune Do/BJJ/Wrestling/Boxing/Escrma stick fighting.

I've since moved away from hand-to-hand combat training as my philosophy on violence has changed drastically. As I've gotten older basketball training is where I place my focus.

I've moved to a more "bodybuilding friendly" routine, away from the SL 5x5 program. To build size you'll need more then 5 reps in a set. Always focus on the compound movements and anything extra you do should be with the idea of improving your big lifts.

Glad that we have a somewhat active fitness thread here as I suspect some Knicks fans might be more of the "armchair coach/GM" variety. lol.

metrocard
Jul 09, 2012, 10:51
I don't use machines often, before I graduated with a bachelors in Exercise Science, I had to perfect a variety of olympic lifts before passing my Anaerobic Training class. This included preforming and instructing. Its easy to preform an exercise, but being able to teach the skill to someone else is a whole different thing. This is why most people who work out shouldn't be out given advice if they don't really understand the background of what they're doing.

The most I ever squat was 405 lbs X 5 reps, max a little higher than that.

I don't need to lift big though because I box. Squating is a vital exercise for me though because I do modeling for a calendering for extra cash.

My formula is 4 sets, with 15 seconds of rest cut in between. 12 reps each set with 40-55% of my 1RM in each rep. Last set I may put 3 plates on each side just to add the resistance.

I don't lift much, my ab routine is insane, planking for 10 minutes straight along. I work out my upper body with pull ups(200 a day, except on Weds and Sunday) and pushups (600 a day except on Monday and Friday).

I work a lot with kettlebells for strength gains also, but like I said before being an amateur boxer I do a lot of agility drills and work on the track, sprints, bounding, box jumps, I run atleast 5 miles a day by Yancey Park by Yankee stadium....I try to keep all my fitness components well conditioned, Strength endurance, Speed, Flexibility, Agility, Power(combo of speed and strength in certain time), Balance, Cardiovascular endurance, and my brain.

I feel like the brain is the most underrated muscle in terms in fitness.

Its improtant to always clear your mind before you work out and know how to get into the ZONE you're producing optimal arousal, I'll explain more about that later.

I have a fight coming up in the last week of July and I'll let you guys know how well that'll go.


BTW heres a simple tip for you guys.

Everything works.
No one does jumpjacks anymore because they seem so basic, they're really great at burning calories and losing up the shoulders and hips.

But like I said, everything works, just work out. People are too caught up these days with the new exercise trends and doing the coolest workouts or copying someone's program.

If you work out hard to 60-80% of your maximum, AEROBICALLY and ANAERBOICALLY, and if you rest 7 hours a day, results are automatic for everyone.

5 days a week is all thats needed. 7 days in a week is just not enough time for your body to recover.

orangeblobman
Jul 10, 2012, 12:11
5 days a week is way too much for most people. You are probably genetically atypical in that you can gain muscle by just looking at weight haha.

2 days, 3 tops is what will give the best results for regular guys lifting heavy weights.

I'm on a truncated routine now where I squat bench and row one day, second day I deadlift, overhead press and bang some pull ups out.

iSaYughh
Jul 10, 2012, 16:42
Working out 5 days/week is fine for the vast majority of people who aren't obese or severely weak/unconditioned.

It just depends on the intensity of the sessions, and what you are doing.

Sure, only well trained athletes can train 5x/week with intensity, including boxing etc.

But 2 to 3 dedicated strength sessions per week, along with several cardio (bike ride, tennis, eg) or metabolic conditioning routines are fine for people.

Of course, diet and rest are key. And everybody is different.

It also depends on your goals. My best all-around range of fitness, was when I was just training 3x/week, and doing zero cardio (except for walking and casual biking).

I've also trained 4 to 5x/week, including multiples in a given day.

Metro said the absolute best and most true thing tho: just ****ing train, train hard and with intensity (for whatever level of fitness you might be), and be consistent n logical with your goals.

It will all come together from there.

iSaYughh
Jul 10, 2012, 16:52
Sorry if I missed it isayughh, but are you training for MMA/boxing? just curious. I trained in wing chun kung fu for years and later did Jeet Kune Do/BJJ/Wrestling/Boxing/Escrma stick fighting.

I've since moved away from hand-to-hand combat training as my philosophy on violence has changed drastically. As I've gotten older basketball training is where I place my focus.

I've moved to a more "bodybuilding friendly" routine, away from the SL 5x5 program. To build size you'll need more then 5 reps in a set. Always focus on the compound movements and anything extra you do should be with the idea of improving your big lifts.

Glad that we have a somewhat active fitness thread here as I suspect some Knicks fans might be more of the "armchair coach/GM" variety. lol.

Sup. I'm not currently, but I trained and competed in bjj for many years; and muay thai, also, which I've had 3 fights for. I have a couple years of pure boxing experience, and boxing is what I'd like to dedicate myself to if I get back into a sport.

Might check out Mendez Boxing soon in the city.

Right now, I'm just training for fitness. Bike a lot, am getting back into tennis a bit, and going to do a combat-style training regiment for the next 2months. I weigh 225 right now, and would like to get down to 205 by the end of it, and see whats what.

If I start boxing again, I'd look to cut even lower to 195 or so, and start focusing on making myself as big a beast as possible at a 195 walk around weight, and ultimately compete in 180 or whatever weight class is around there.

I hear you on not focusing on combat sports, though. It's not for everyone, and it can take a toll on you. Since I've stopped, I'm amazed at the stuff I've done, just in the training alone....The excellence of any quality fighter, amateur or pro, is beyond the comprehension of most people -- even most people in great shape and who go to the gym, but don't really train or compete.

Personally, I think you can gain plenty of size doing 5x5 style programs -- I gained the most muscle mass in my life, over a couple short months, doing a basic 5x5, 3x/week, and drinking a gallon of whole milk each day.

It's really about your diet, and like you said compound lifts are good, and going extremely hard in the gym, and then making sure you recover -- if your recovery sucks, even with a good diet and going hard in the gym, you might not see much.

In theory, I would agree w you that a "body building" style program is best for gaining muscle; however, I don't believe it is mutually exclusive.

If you like that style, though, by all means, and it is the "best" for muscle. :)

I did wing chun, too, btw, way back when. Not my thing, but pretty damn cool ****.

edit -- on topic of body building.....at end of my 5x5 (squat, bench, power cleans, shoulder press, deadlift, weighted pullups) I deadlifted 605, with a 450 ass to grass squat; for the hell of it, I went to do some curls after my cycle, and handled 65lbs dumbbells curls with ease and measured over an inch on each bicep. Just fwiw :) And bc I think some people get too wrapped up in "body building", and lose sight of other areas and things that come into play. Though for many, body buiding is certainly a great option and if you enjoy it and like doing it, nothing better.

metrocard
Jul 12, 2012, 11:28
5 days a week is way too much for most people. You are probably genetically atypical in that you can gain muscle by just looking at weight haha.

2 days, 3 tops is what will give the best results for regular guys lifting heavy weights.


That's pretty much like brushing your teeth 2-3 times a week.

The best results?
Are you sure about that?
Have you tried other training methods?
The best results in what? Strength and Size?
What about flexibility, breathe control, cardiovascular endurance, strength endurance, agility, balance, body composition, body fat%, core strength, and stability...you may very well be inferior in all these components.

The truth is, it takes more than 2-3 days to train these components.

Also important, whats your reason for exercise?

Ask yourself that.

Now ask yourself, why did the first man exercise? What is the original reason of exercise? Is that reason lost? When you go into a gym, it is hard to recognize what the true reason for physical training is. Everyone is so full of **** these days... modern training has lost its roots.
The truth is, the history of physical training, or working out, is based on WAR. Ancient warriors would train so they would be prepared to protect themselves, their families and their property from attack. Their training was not so much about looking better, but performing better. I think modern day exercisers should take this cue from Ancient Warriors.

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/397287_368556786504558_799027327_n.jpg
This guy was trained to KILL YOU.

You work out twice a week. The days you rest, sit on the couch and watch TV...theres someone out there training 4-5 days more than you in preparation to kill you as you rest.

If you were unfit, you didn't survive! That's how it was back in 1300 in Puerto Rico with Tainos, even in more accient times of the Greeks and the Chinese. Training, and getting the physical improvements from training, was not about looking good in spandex or taking your shirt off at the beach. Their motivation for training was nothing less than SURVIVAL.

Imagine workout out as if your life depended on it. I really mean that.

Forget about what the bodybuilding community tells you about training muscles. Exercise is really about movement. Two types of movement really... The movement of your own body AND the movement of objects.
I see you do your squats, various olympic lifts and pullups, that's GREAT. I love those exercises.

Bodyweight calisthenics are the best way to train your body to move in the way it most naturally moves. Every movement of the body can be trained and improved with bodyweight exercises. On the other hand, dumbbells or kettlebells are the best ways to train the body to move objects. Just like an Ancient Warrior, combining bodyweight and dumbbell workouts are the best way to build a strong, attractive and functional body.

I understand quality over quanity. Yes. I apply that to my fitness.
Sometimes less is NOT more. Sometimes less is just less.
People seem to spend a lot of time and energy trying to AVOID the one thing they often need more of which is time on task.

For example, when I start my boxing session; I shadowbox my life away in 5-6 rounds. That means I act like as if I'm fighting and giving it all my energy. By the time I spar, I'm so tired that can an old lady can beat me up with the ammount of energy I have. That's my secret. Because when I come back the next day, my body is prepared physically and mentality to do demage. Why? I trained my stamina and muscular endurance to a level that I raise the peak every time. Its doable, so why not do it?

I tell you what, the biggest complement I get in my gym is my foot and hand speed, time, swiftness but most important is my endurance.

I sparr 4 times a week.
Everyday I sparr 3 men, 3 rounds each for a total of 9 rounds.
I continue my workout after that, hitting the bag, hitting the pads with my training, speed bag, working under the rope, skipping rope, 250 pull ups, 600 push ups...whatever it may be, it's just for the reason I'm training for...these are simply workouts because theres fighter's in my gym who do more than I do and at a higher quality.

It's not just related to boxing, I use to be a strength and conditioning assistant to the Manhattan Jaspers, D1 basketball team in the MAAC. They do what you do in a week times 2 in a their monday workout routine. Theres a reason why they're D1 athletes, theres a reason why I'm an amatuer boxer, and theres a reason why you're blobman.

metrocard
Jul 12, 2012, 11:32
Sup. I'm not currently, but I trained and competed in bjj for many years; and muay thai, also, which I've had 3 fights for. I have a couple years of pure boxing experience, and boxing is what I'd like to dedicate myself to if I get back into a sport.

Might check out Mendez Boxing soon in the city.

Right now, I'm just training for fitness. Bike a lot, am getting back into tennis a bit, and going to do a combat-style training regiment for the next 2months. I weigh 225 right now, and would like to get down to 205 by the end of it, and see whats what.

If I start boxing again, I'd look to cut even lower to 195 or so, and start focusing on making myself as big a beast as possible at a 195 walk around weight, and ultimately compete in 180 or whatever weight class is around there.

I hear you on not focusing on combat sports, though. It's not for everyone, and it can take a toll on you. Since I've stopped, I'm amazed at the stuff I've done, just in the training alone....The excellence of any quality fighter, amateur or pro, is beyond the comprehension of most people -- even most people in great shape and who go to the gym, but don't really train or compete.

Personally, I think you can gain plenty of size doing 5x5 style programs -- I gained the most muscle mass in my life, over a couple short months, doing a basic 5x5, 3x/week, and drinking a gallon of whole milk each day.

It's really about your diet, and like you said compound lifts are good, and going extremely hard in the gym, and then making sure you recover -- if your recovery sucks, even with a good diet and going hard in the gym, you might not see much.

In theory, I would agree w you that a "body building" style program is best for gaining muscle; however, I don't believe it is mutually exclusive.

If you like that style, though, by all means, and it is the "best" for muscle. :)

I did wing chun, too, btw, way back when. Not my thing, but pretty damn cool ****.

edit -- on topic of body building.....at end of my 5x5 (squat, bench, power cleans, shoulder press, deadlift, weighted pullups) I deadlifted 605, with a 450 ass to grass squat; for the hell of it, I went to do some curls after my cycle, and handled 65lbs dumbbells curls with ease and measured over an inch on each bicep. Just fwiw :) And bc I think some people get too wrapped up in "body building", and lose sight of other areas and things that come into play. Though for many, body buiding is certainly a great option and if you enjoy it and like doing it, nothing better.

Come to World Wide Boxing Gym in the Bronx.
Its only 120 for 3 months
Trainers are 25 a week.
I don't know what part of nyc you're in but if you're around the 4train check it out, its by Bedford Park/Lehman College.
When you start up, I'll let you sparr with me(I'm 160 lbs but I sparr people from 140 lbs to 190 lbs), I'll let you throw your punches and work your combos, I work with new people so they can get comfortable with being in the ring. It'll be a good experience if you want to get into the boxing and need someone to give you a helping hand.

Peace brother.

iSaYughh
Jul 12, 2012, 19:12
Come to World Wide Boxing Gym in the Bronx.
Its only 120 for 3 months
Trainers are 25 a week.
I don't know what part of nyc you're in but if you're around the 4train check it out, its by Bedford Park/Lehman College.
When you start up, I'll let you sparr with me(I'm 160 lbs but I sparr people from 140 lbs to 190 lbs), I'll let you throw your punches and work your combos, I work with new people so they can get comfortable with being in the ring. It'll be a good experience if you want to get into the boxing and need someone to give you a helping hand.

Peace brother.

Yo. I actually most definitely will check out your gym, and take you up on your offer bro. That sounds ideal, and I appreciate it.

I'm around 10th st and there's a 4 pretty close by too, so work out well.

Membership + training sounds like a beast deal.

It's not easy finding a legit pure boxing gym that doesnt rape you in price and isn't some cardio-boxing place.

I'll for sure you hit up on here in PM next month or two when I can check it out n be able to sign up. :smokin:

orangeblobman
Jul 13, 2012, 07:40
That's pretty much like brushing your teeth 2-3 times a week.

The best results?
Are you sure about that?
Have you tried other training methods?
The best results in what? Strength and Size?
What about flexibility, breathe control, cardiovascular endurance, strength endurance, agility, balance, body composition, body fat%, core strength, and stability...you may very well be inferior in all these components.

The truth is, it takes more than 2-3 days to train these components.

Also important, whats your reason for exercise?



I don't see it as exercise, it's just gaining strength. I want to be as strong as possible for my body.

Strength has a functional component outside of warfare. If you are strong, your life is better.

The 2-3 days lifting weights is more than enough for impressive development. I go by "progressive poundages in good form" and I go conservative to avoid injuries and get more out of my training in the long-term. The rest is just as important as the training.

CoolClyde
Jul 22, 2012, 09:25
Yo. I actually most definitely will check out your gym, and take you up on your offer bro. That sounds ideal, and I appreciate it.

I'm around 10th st and there's a 4 pretty close by too, so work out well.

Membership + training sounds like a beast deal.

It's not easy finding a legit pure boxing gym that doesnt rape you in price and isn't some cardio-boxing place.

I'll for sure you hit up on here in PM next month or two when I can check it out n be able to sign up. :smokin:

I'd like to see Metrocard vs iSayUghh in the ring.
Metro, can KO members come to your fight to root you on?

i think next season it's due time for NYC KO members to get together for a game and/or eats at Clyde's Wine n Dine.

metrocard
Jul 22, 2012, 11:07
Cool, definitely.

Lets make a plan for the game.

Knicks online game event.

metrocard
Jul 23, 2012, 12:43
http://www.definitions.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Bulking_Up_Your_Brain.jpg


How Exercise Leads To A Better Brain.
For more than a decade, neuroscientists and physiologists have been gathering evidence of the beneficial relationship between exercise and brainpower — and recent discoveries suggest that training may beat studying when it comes to building brainpower.

Using sophisticated technologies to examine the workings of individual neurons — and the makeup of brain matter itself — scientists have discovered that exercise can actually build a brain that resists physical shrinkage and while at the same time enhances cognitive flexibility.

In short: A team of researchers led by Justin S. Rhodes, a psychology professor at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois, gathered four groups of mice and set them into four distinct living arrangements. Group One lived in a world of sensual and gustatory plenty. Group Two had access to all of these pleasures, plus they had small disc-shaped running wheels in their cages. A third group’s cages held no embellishments, and received standard, dull kibble. The fourth group’s homes contained the running wheels but no other toys or treats.

After several months, Rhodes’s team examined his subjects’ brain tissue — and found that the toys and tastes, no matter how stimulating, had not improved the animals’ brains.

“Only one thing had mattered,” Rhodes says, “and that’s whether they had a running wheel.” Animals that exercised, whether or not they had any other enrichments in their cages, had healthier brains and performed significantly better on cognitive tests than the other mice.

Why would exercise build brainpower? In VERY short: The brain, like all muscles and organs, is a tissue, and its function declines with underuse and age — and exercise can slow or even reverse its physical decay.



http://www.definitions.com/exercise-science/i-lift-therefore-i-think/

p0nder
Jul 25, 2012, 09:33
Imagine workout out as if your life depended on it.

Metro! Sick motivation right there! I'm going to the gym in about an hour.

Also to OBM: 2 days is probably a bit light, even if you are doing HUGE volume workouts. That's 3 days rest between workouts. While rest is important you can do "active rest days" to decrease bodyfat% and get stronger. I'd say 3x a week is good for the beginner programs but as your strength and endurance goes up you can increase the # of days you workout.

Metro: i'm interested in your experience and knowledge. I wish I lived in NYC so I could pick your brain on the topic of fitness and nutrition in person. I'm currently dieting down from 230 to 200 in an attempt to look awesome for my wedding/honeymoon (September) But also to increase my vertical jump and my basketball skills/effectiveness/explosiveness. I'm not so much interested in "Bodybuilding" as I am athletic gains.

I've begun investigating various jump programs (http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/theultimatesplit.html) and The Vertical Jump Bible. Combining them with upper body workouts and progressive weight training to get into game shape for this upcoming basketball season (I'm a D3 player, play some D2 call up games).

The season starts in October so I'm hoping that by cutting to ~200 by then I will be more effective.

Is there a program you implemented for the D1 team that would be useful for me? Perhaps you can point me in the right direction or at least let me know if I'm on the right path with my choice of combining pylo and resistance training work.

orangeblobman
Jul 25, 2012, 14:31
I just read Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik and the secret of weight training was revealed in this book: THICK BAR work!!!!!

You're only as strong as your hands and forearms, the weakest link, and working with a thick bar will make your arms and hands very strong, so that you will handle huge weights and gain the slabs!

My goal is to be like one of the old-time strongmen.

Already my core is becoming so strong and getting the 'look'. It's a big difference between the guys that have awesome core strength and the guys who do not have this core.

But 2 days is MORE than ENOUGH if you're lifting HEAVY and HARD!!!! MORE than enough. You can become a MONSTERRRR by lifting 2 times a week for 30-60 minutes.