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p0nder
Sep 07, 2012, 09:07
wow! 35 minutes would be a great time for 5k for me!! I tried to run more then that a few months back... I ran home from work... 4.20 miles in 1 hour 8 minutes. It was not pretty.

24:32 is fast dude. I will work up to it and run the 5k by the end of the month and report back with my time. I'm gonna aim for it in 35 minutes and see where that gets me. That yoga workout looks intense! i've been using another video with hatha and flow yoga but this looks much more difficult. I may try it with the wifey this weekend.

metrocard
Sep 10, 2012, 13:01
Read my blog on FB, feel free to add me.

http://www.facebook.com/notes/jos%C3%A9-hyland/lets-talk-fitness/10151136050364906


"It is not "I am doing this," but rather an inner realization that "this is happening through me"." –.Bruce Lee.

The outer is the inner and there should be no division.
The body lives with this understanding.

Exercise should not be complicated. Exercise is learning to practice a form of art that will later become formless. In your movements, include beauty and sensitivity. This creates an emotional substance of inner health functions that are living and giving the human-body and a human-being its human-life.

By did the way did you hear that a new condition has emerged, called Diabetes III. A symptom of this Diabetes III is Alzheimers: brought about by a LACK of cholesterol. Can we please not put all our faith into studies, what experts say or even me? Information we gather can be disproven within time and research. Do not deny or aprove, merely OBSERVE. Simply be uninfluenced.

How to eat
You need to eat EVERYTHING.
Carb, protein, fats — they’re all essential to your body; the key is moderation.
You need to eat at the right TIME.
Don’t starve when your body needs energy, and don’t over-eat when you have enough.
Timing your meals allow you to stay full on less food.Your diet should fit your needs.

Diets are not one-size-fits-all.
Everyone’s bodies, lifestyles, diets, and dieting goals are different.
A weight loss diet for one person might lead to weight gain for another.
Healthy dieting requires:
TIMING (of meals)
VARIETY (of foods)
BALANCE (of nutrients)
MODERATION (of portions)

Meat - Stick to white meat. It is easier for your body to digest, processes faster through your body, and doesn’t sit around in your stomach making you sluggish. Examples of white meat are chicken, turkey, and fish. Funny how white meat happens to be lean animals that can fly or move quickly? Red meat is the stuff you try to avoid if you can – which is beef or pork. Maybe it’s because our cows and pigs are fed crap that it makes their meat less healthy for the body.

Proteins - Besides meat, eggs, tuna, greek yogurt, beef jerky and almond or soy milk are an excellent source of pure protein.

Fruits and Vegetables – Everybody needs vitamins, this is a requirement to be a healthy person in general. Eat a wide variety of them. Remember the more colorful the better. Broccoli, Spinach, Blueberries, Apples, Oranges, Cherries, Carrots.

Liquids - Water, water, water! One gallon a day is minimum for everybody in general. Two to three gallons is a must if you workout hard and/or live in a hot state. Again, this is a minimum, if you can drink more, do it. Stay the hell away from alcohol, it will slow you down, fatten you up, and put you in more situations where you are likely to be straying away from the healthy boxer’s lifestyle!

Fats - Honestly, this has more to do with your genetic makeup than anything. If you have a body that builds up fat easily, stay away from saturated fats for at least five days out of the week. Mono and poly unsaturated fats are good.


55% - Carbs
25% - Fats
20% - Protein

Try to maintain that balance.

Knowing WHEN to eat,is as important as knowing WHAT to eat.

Our #1 problem is figuring out when to eat. (Most people know what to eat. Fruits are good, junk foods are bad, etc) If you’re eating healthy but still not losing weight, it’s probably your timing that’s off. If you don’t eat at the right time, it matters very little whether you eat healthy or not–because the food gets transformed into fat anyway!

The #1 diet problemNot eating when the body needs food,and then over-eating when finally eating.

… so when do we eat?

Your body is constantly using energy, spiking its energy use during your workout.Your diet should follow your energy use as closely as possible.


Bad diet plan of eating 3 big meals a day.
Over-eating converts surplus nutrients to fatfewer meals leaves you hungry & weak in between mealsstarving often leads to more over-eating.
One of the biggest diet mistakes is waiting too long in between meals.
If you wait till your stomach is grumbling, your body is already starving (decreased energy and recovery rate).
Extreme hunger is usually countered with the next diet mistake, over-eating, which increases fat storage. One mistake usually leads to the other, putting your body in a vicious cycle of starvation (decreased metabolism) followed by periods of over-eating (fat gain).


Good diet plan of 6 meals a day
smaller meals keep you energized and full throughout the daysnacks keep you from starving during long workouts and in between mealssmaller meals keep your metabolism high while avoiding over-eatingEating smaller meals more closely matches your body’s energy use. Your biggest meals are in the mornings and the one before your workout. Smaller meals keep you satisfied without putting extra calories into you.

Start eating before you get too hungry. Stop eating before you get too full.


Biggest Meal in the Morning
Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It’s the first supply of nutrients for your day and kickstarts your body’s metabolism. Once you have a full breakfast, you can make it through the rest of the day on smaller meals to avoid getting hungry. Don’t be silly and skip breakfast as part of your weight loss plan. This leaves you hungry and sends your body into starvation mode (decreasing metabolism), making it stingy for energy and storing everything you eat as fat. You You need to have energy to start your day; you need to eat good breakfast.



Breakfast AFTER Your Morning Run
If you do your runs in the morning, it’s best to eat breakfast after that. First off, running on a full stomach is a terrible idea. Secondly, running on an empty stomach helps you lose weight because your body will be burning off stored fat instead of the food you ate that day. It’s not necessary to do your runs in the morning, but the common belief is that it burns off fat stored from the previous night and energizes you for the day.

Aside from breakfast, the workout meal is the second and only other big meal on your training day


1. No sugar
2. No saturated fat
3. Cut the bread out of your diet
4. Don't combine foods (burgers, sandwiches, etc)
5. Eat things seperate, for an example: a can of tuna
6. Think before you eat. Ask yourself why? Are you really hungry?
7. Take it as a challenge and be proud of yourself for taking care of your body.
8. Motivate yourself. You have a photoshoot of your body that will be posted on facebook in two weeks. What are you going to do about it?
Improve your diet…not your supplements.

Into the realm of training: Work yourself to 80% of your maximal output then rest adequetely. It produces the best results through my research. If I can do 40 max pull ups, I only need to do about sets of 30 to improve aesthetics and fitness components. Do not work yourself out to failure.
Do your endurance cardiovascular workouts in broken rhythm of intervals. It creates a perfect balance of fat loss and lean muscle gain.
You're not serious about fitness if you dont start out with and keep running outdoors in your routine. Running outside is extremely effective, especially if you're aiming to burn belly fat. Another great workout to lean your body and burn off fat in unwanted areas is jumproping. If you don't have a jumprope, do yourself a favor and purchase one. A routine of jumproping for 15-30 minutes 4-5 times a week will suprise you with the results you'll get in just two weeks. When you do your cardio, keep it hard & continous exceeding steady physiological state and producing near exhaustion, not complete exhaustion.


The best four tips for losing fat are diet, metabolic resistance training, high intensity interval training and time.

Signing up at a gym: People need to be self motivated. No piece of equipment is going to get some lazy fat ass off the couch and to the gym. Motivation comes from within.
The gym enviroment is horrible, copying someones style dulls your creativity, conditions & freezes your freedom. You no longer "be", just "do". Your routine becomes stale and inner growth is limited. It's best to discover and arrive at fitness. Surround yourself around experienced fitness professionals who will allow you to be creative.


Poor form: For every incorrect repetition you have completed, three correct repetitions must be done to change the pattern of body memory compartment.
If the exercise movement is performed incorrectly for twenty one days, the body will adapt and accept it.
When one is feeling good, you stand upright and breathe slow and deep. This posture creates a moment of health because it opens you up.
Posture regulates energy levels. A good physical posture can blend in with gravity. A healthy mental posture can blend well in life.

Specificity + Frequent Practice = Success
Do not train to failure. If you can perform a maximum of 10 pull ups, then you’ll want to train by performing 5-8 reps, 3-4 times per day, 4-6 days per week. There is neurological process of where strength gain becomes more efficient, it becomes easier for your muscles to repeat that movement. Hence, by doing more pull ups or more pushups, you get better at doing them. This technique does not only work with bodyweight exercises either. You can easily increase your bench press or squats by incorporating the same methodology.

You may preform 50-80% of your maximum number of reps so that your muscles avoid failure. You should do this 3-4 times per day: morning, noon, night, before bed, any time really. The more often you do it, the better you’ll get at pushups or pull ups. Always stop at least 1 rep shy of failure. You don’t want to teach your muscles to fail during this process.
Do as much work as possible while staying fresh as possible.


Abdominals: Many people are zoned into the aesthics of abdominals and forget the function of abdominals. We get stuck with our ego as human beings to look pretty and put aside our health benefits. The purpose of the abdominal is quality stability, to serve and protect the vital compartment called the Abdominal Cavity. A strong core improves respiration, breathing, blood-flow, brain, immune-system and the other functional obligations to the health of the human body. t's cute to have wash board abdominals, but it has to be a priority to health advancements to exercisers to maintain a strong core.

Keep in mind the stomach is not the abdominal. It is an organ located lower left under the rib cage.The right diet, nutrition and progressive exercise will help to “flatten” the belly-gut.

The abdominal crunch or sit-ups is “suppose” to work the upper abdominal. Why are people than working the upper abdominal area? To work abdominals it'll be more efficient to work all areas of the abdominals; obliques, lower abdominals, and your back. Do not divide, but arrive at a functional-collective-effort.

I'll end this writing by killing some myths that may have completely ruined you due to crappy conditioning from "fitness experts" that have fed you with hot bull****.



Myth: Bread and pasta make you fat? How about no.

Truth: Anything can make you gain weight and add excess fat. Lettuce can be stored as fat. Any food or drink with calories can be stored as body fat if it causes your blood sugar levels to exceed what the body NEEDS at that TIME. Bread and pasta are actually great sources of complex carbohydrate! The key is HOW much you eat and WHEN you eat it. Got it?

Myth: Strength training will make you bulk up.

Truth: NO! Mostly women are concerned with this one. Muscles bruns calories, so the more muscle you have the more calories you will burn. This makes it easier to burn fat and harder to gain fat.

Myth: Eating after 6pm will make you fat.

Truth: Not really. It all depends on whether or not the body needs that amount of calories at that time. Keep in mind your body is constantly burning calories, 24 hours per day, just the amount varies. It's just better to eat earlier for energy storage and body recovery. I eat late at night because I work the entire day training people, and I'm only 7% body fat.

We begin again, we never give up.

NYNYK
Sep 11, 2012, 10:00
What is your opinion on crossfit?

iSaYughh
Sep 11, 2012, 16:29
^ I did CF for appox 6months.

CF is basically just an intense, total body conditioning program, that relies heavily upon metrics to track performance and progress.

It's like a kitchen sink approach in many ways -- their programming, in theory, will help you adapt and make gains across many different fitness modalities:

strength
power
speed strength
anaerobic conditioning
etc

It has quite a few flaws that make it far from optimal for most people -- but that said, it's 100x better than 99% of the stuff most people do (and most trainers/training programs rec).

Fairly expensive, too. If you like CF style training, your best bet is creating your own hybrid program that fits your lifestyle, goals, and current fitness level (and which is flexible to adapt as your lifestyle, goals, fitness level change).

CF has a Strength Bias version of their program, which is pretty damn good. But it's pretty advanced, and again, it's quite rigid, so most people are better off doing some hybrid of it for themselves.

Few issues that sum up CF's downsides:

*I know a few CF studs (guys who would make you look like a weak ***** during CF workouts).....but who also gas out playing flag football or tennis when just ****ing around "extracurricularly" with friends

*Lack of strength focus (read: progression); which particularly hurts people who aren't already very strong (which is most people.....even non-fat, reasonably fit people)

*Fairly expensive, and somewhat cult-like (depends on the CF affiliate though!!!!!), and thus quite rigid

*Reliance on chippers/very long duration metabolic conditioning....for the vast majority of ppl this isn't optimal for their goals, and frankly it's too much for most people....and it is what leads to burnout, as well as injury risk....and even amongst really fit people (a la the CF studs mentioned above) will lead to the type of CNS burnout that will make you feel like ****....and not really have peak performance in life (or sports)

metrocard
Sep 13, 2012, 20:07
^ I did CF for appox 6months.

CF is basically just an intense, total body conditioning program, that relies heavily upon metrics to track performance and progress.

It's like a kitchen sink approach in many ways -- their programming, in theory, will help you adapt and make gains across many different fitness modalities:

strength
power
speed strength
anaerobic conditioning
etc

It has quite a few flaws that make it far from optimal for most people -- but that said, it's 100x better than 99% of the stuff most people do (and most trainers/training programs rec).

Fairly expensive, too. If you like CF style training, your best bet is creating your own hybrid program that fits your lifestyle, goals, and current fitness level (and which is flexible to adapt as your lifestyle, goals, fitness level change).

CF has a Strength Bias version of their program, which is pretty damn good. But it's pretty advanced, and again, it's quite rigid, so most people are better off doing some hybrid of it for themselves.

Few issues that sum up CF's downsides:

*I know a few CF studs (guys who would make you look like a weak ***** during CF workouts).....but who also gas out playing flag football or tennis when just ****ing around "extracurricularly" with friends

*Lack of strength focus (read: progression); which particularly hurts people who aren't already very strong (which is most people.....even non-fat, reasonably fit people)

*Fairly expensive, and somewhat cult-like (depends on the CF affiliate though!!!!!), and thus quite rigid

*Reliance on chippers/very long duration metabolic conditioning....for the vast majority of ppl this isn't optimal for their goals, and frankly it's too much for most people....and it is what leads to burnout, as well as injury risk....and even amongst really fit people (a la the CF studs mentioned above) will lead to the type of CNS burnout that will make you feel like ****....and not really have peak performance in life (or sports)

I did CrossFit today as apart of my workout, I was bored.

This is what I did.

What are you thoughts?

xEHkDmG8gPY

I mean it is true that the CNS will get burned out and doesn't recover for quite some time, I took the risk knowing I screwed myself over with that. Balance is key, that's why I think CrossFit isn't really the smartest thing to do in a program, its a great workout but doesn't allow you to peak in performance like you said. You know your stuff brother.

metrocard
Sep 24, 2012, 21:04
Flexibility, Cardiovascular Endurance, Muscular Endurance, Speed and Strength. The Fab 5 Components of Fitness.
Nourish & develop each one.

NYNYK
Sep 25, 2012, 19:18
Thanks for the info, guys. little late in replying but haven't had a chance to check forums. So I signed up for crossfit for a month but didn't stick with it bc it was part of a groupon and would have gotten expensive if I continued (to the tune of like $150/month, $40 more then I used to pay going to an MMA gym which coincidentally offered a strength and conditioning class in addition to their martial arts classes).

What I found weird with it is that the workouts seemed kind of random and we were using weights everyday. From my understanding, doing high intensity workouts EVERY day hurts more than it helps and it's good to have a rest day in between where you do cardio or something light.

Again, I don't have extensive knowledge on this so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

metrocard
Sep 26, 2012, 12:20
Thanks for the info, guys. little late in replying but haven't had a chance to check forums. So I signed up for crossfit for a month but didn't stick with it bc it was part of a groupon and would have gotten expensive if I continued (to the tune of like $150/month, $40 more then I used to pay going to an MMA gym which coincidentally offered a strength and conditioning class in addition to their martial arts classes).

What I found weird with it is that the workouts seemed kind of random and we were using weights everyday. From my understanding, doing high intensity workouts EVERY day hurts more than it helps and it's good to have a rest day in between where you do cardio or something light.

Again, I don't have extensive knowledge on this so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

Yep.

It takes a toll on your central nervous system.

you CNS takes about two weeks to recover from Cross Fit.

Their ideology is just to train hard everyday and eventually see results.

But guess what happens?

They get injured, suffer from pain and leave the gym.

Leave the gym by choice, not by injury or pain. Workout smart and hard enough.

p0nder
Sep 28, 2012, 09:37
again the issue i see with CF workouts is that a lot of the time they do not stress form and coupled with the intensity of the workouts it leads to injuries. I'd love to get access to the CF gym without the instructors though. they have some really cool stuff.

Metro, i'm having trouble keeping my legs fresh on the court. Should I be working out with weights and/or cardio on days that I have basketball practice/scrimmage/games?

I'm also still working on my runs for a good 5k time. Supposed to go for a run with my sister-in-law over the weekend and she's a very fast runner. Last time I tried to keep up I nearly puked. Hoping I fare better this time around. I'll report back with a time.

Crazy⑧s
Oct 10, 2012, 11:00
Got back in the gym last week. Man has the extra weight burdened my stamina. I can still bench 90 kgs, which used to be 10 more kgs than I weighed, now it's 10 less, so I'm happy with that, but that doesn't change the fact that I'm a bit of a fat sl*t. :lol:

p0nder
Oct 16, 2012, 08:12
Hah i was looking up some info on basketball workouts and came across a site that has Amar'e and Melo workouts. They are a bit older from their younger days with PHX and DEN but it's still pretty cool:

http://www.stack.com/2006/03/01/amare-stoudemires-training-plan/

p0nder
Oct 16, 2012, 08:19
Oh
I was also supposed to check in with my 5k time.

37.30. Ugly.

Gonna try to get out again on Saturday morning. but that means I gotta be up like 40 minutes before my daughter and that's early as hell. Hopefully I can manage it.

I've got a basketball game tonight. I've got a chest and tricep workout on tap for this afternoon. I also did Legs yesterday. Should I try to fit in a 35 minute run too? My legs are sore after the bodyweight widowmaker attempt. Maybe i'll just go to the bike and get the blood flowing instead of running it. Less wear on my ankles and knees.

Hope everyone's planning on staying fit during the season!

orangeblobman
Oct 16, 2012, 09:45
Yo I just got into dumbbell training! Got Kubik's video from '98 where he demonstrates things like clean and press and the swing. He goes over his head on the swing.

I'm adapting my power rack, you guys know I moved so I had to disassemble the rack, well now I'm using two of the posts from the rack to make a squat stand in the garage so that the car can fit but I can also get my squats up.

I'm building the squat stand this weekend, then I'm starting a new program of squats, deadlifts and cleans and presses with the dumbbells. Thinking about going for 20 rep squats, so Monday, for example, would be something like:

Squat 20 reps
Two hand dumbbell clean and press

and then Thursday would be like:

Deadlift heavy
Swings and farmer's walk

But I also have a game tonight at 10, second game of the season for me. First was a disaster because I drank a bottle of wine on that game day, the second game I had to miss because I didn't sleep much because of Monday night football and tonight I'm excited but I'm going into it with a new strategy:

I'm gonna give all my energy to defense and rebounding, and I won't sprint up the court, I'll just jog up slowly because our team runs and I'll never be with them on the run (not yet anyway), so I'm gonna not sprint at all and just give it all on defense, then I'll trail with a jog so that if the run fails, I can contribute in the half-court offense.

Cheers, happy training if you will train today!!!!!!!!

metrocard
Oct 16, 2012, 10:15
Oh
I was also supposed to check in with my 5k time.

37.30. Ugly.

Gonna try to get out again on Saturday morning. but that means I gotta be up like 40 minutes before my daughter and that's early as hell. Hopefully I can manage it.

I've got a basketball game tonight. I've got a chest and tricep workout on tap for this afternoon. I also did Legs yesterday. Should I try to fit in a 35 minute run too? My legs are sore after the bodyweight widowmaker attempt. Maybe i'll just go to the bike and get the blood flowing instead of running it. Less wear on my ankles and knees.

Hope everyone's planning on staying fit during the season!

37, you can build off that, I'd say in 4 weeks you can get to 30:00

Try This

HIIT - 15 minutes on the treadmill
2 Minutes of Walking (3.0-4.0)

1 Min of Running (6.0 - 8.8)
30 Sec of Sprinting (9.0 - 12.0)
30 Sec of Walking (3.0-4.0)

Repeat 7 times

Monday - HIIT
Tuesday - Long Distance Run (5K)
Weds - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Thursday - HIIT
Friday - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Saturday - Long Distance Run (5K)
Sunday - Off


Try that two weeks...let me know if it helps improve your speed on the 5K.

metrocard
Oct 16, 2012, 10:20
Yesterday before my class I instruct to the members of my gym, I did the HIIT protocol for 15 minutes, Walk was at 4.0, Run at 9.0, and Sprint at 12.0

Then some shadow boxing( I missed boxing training because of a client), and I hit the bag for 15 minutes non stop...I jumprope for a bit also

Quickly went to the pull up ball and did 6 sets of 20 pull ups and 6 sets of 20 chip ups, then to the squat rack for 3 sets of Squat Jumps with 225LBS and 3 sets ass to grass squats.

Couldn't work out much yesterday.

Today is my day off, I'm heading to boxing now, gonna go ham for two hours, then head to my gym and do some power exercises; sports specific movements and work with some kettlebell workouts.

WNIm1jGYl60

metrocard
Oct 16, 2012, 10:22
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metrocard
Oct 16, 2012, 10:30
wVFYdrLXZ-Y

iSaYughh
Oct 16, 2012, 12:40
Some awesome videos holmes.

I like the thick bar training one a lot. Speaking of thick bar training, I worked out a lot in Russia past month. Lots of school yard style workouts. Low tech, but high effect. I've noticed a lot of similarities between these eastern euro style training modalities, and the growing phenomena of like...urban bodyweight/playground/prison style workouts. It's getting hyped up too much, and too much race being injected into the discussion, but the power of true body science can be profound even when applied in basic, low tech ways.

You just need to know the fundamentals of exercise and be already well trained yourself and have great body awareness (verrrrrry underrated) , or have someone with the expertise and talent to coach and train the right way, on an individual level while still applying overall principles and logic into individual situations.

Imo, the best trainers and coaches operate somewhat like that. I consider myself very knowledgeable and experienced with exercise, but i would also call myself a hack trainer. A great workout partner and gym buddy to ppl already well trained, but a poor trainer myself. (compared to legit ones....many trainers are just horrible, and regurgitate Muscle Mag bull****).

iSaYughh
Oct 16, 2012, 12:59
I did CrossFit today as apart of my workout, I was bored.

This is what I did.

What are you thoughts?

xEHkDmG8gPY

I mean it is true that the CNS will get burned out and doesn't recover for quite some time, I took the risk knowing I screwed myself over with that. Balance is key, that's why I think CrossFit isn't really the smartest thing to do in a program, its a great workout but doesn't allow you to peak in performance like you said. You know your stuff brother.

Sorry for the delayed response my man.

This workout is a great example. I'm honestly not sure what it is accomplishing. I believe you should only do things that have a clear purpose for WHY you are doing them as part of your fitness program. It seems you take the same approach and have the ability to apply it to people, individually, from exercise to recovery to nutrition.

Personally, I would only do that type of workout occasionally. And I view it more as a mental toughening routine. It's good to sometimes push yourself mentally and fight through extreme fatigue. It helps especially in a combat sport. But I think there are easier and better ways to achieve this, vs cns burning killers.

For a guy like yourself, already a high level athlete, or the dude in the video, I think it's a fine workout. However! :) I still wouldn't do it if I was playing sports actively, or my overall program already had built in mechanisms that already accomplish what this workout seeks to (minus the risks).

You can just imagine the majority of people who perform "bad ass" workouts like this from cross fit, and how poor they likely look doing it, and the high injury and recovery killing elements that they get smacked with.

To many people who even survive cf, just become good at cf. Hence it gets cult like. And I know some ppl like this who legit get gassed playing a random game of pickup ball bx their cns is so perpetually fried.

You mentioned performance and peak performance in your last sentence. And that's exactly it. From a true athlete, to a normal dude who wants the energy to bang his girl all night and feel constant vitality in day to day living and be able to rise to challenges.

On subject of cf style routines like what u did, I love them conceptually. To me nothing is more fun for cardio and strength-endurance than two things:

Hitting the heavy bag, and doing cross fit style combination routines...But i keep them to ten minutes maximum, and building them around exercises that I know are useful to my goals, and that won't rape my cns and recovery.

But it's crazy how cf workouts can destroy a cns. And the better the athlete the more risk too. Can destroy weeks if not many months of progression and planning.

What's ur take on road work metro? Traditional long duration running, vs sprinting, vs sport specific stuff (heavy bag or shadow boxing routines for cardiovascular benefits) etc.

iSaYughh
Oct 16, 2012, 13:03
Yep.

It takes a toll on your central nervous system.

you CNS takes about two weeks to recover from Cross Fit.

Their ideology is just to train hard everyday and eventually see results.

But guess what happens?

They get injured, suffer from pain and leave the gym.

Leave the gym by choice, not by injury or pain. Workout smart and hard enough.

This is too good to overstate.

Excellent and intense training, demands excellent recovery. Recovery and rest isn't for pussies. Exact opposite.

metrocard
Oct 17, 2012, 03:05
iSay, you dropped a lot of knowledge, Im going to come back to this tomorrow night.

orangeblobman
Oct 17, 2012, 06:51
Wtf are those lunatic swings on the pull up bar?

p0nder
Oct 17, 2012, 09:55
37, you can build off that, I'd say in 4 weeks you can get to 30:00

Try This

HIIT - 15 minutes on the treadmill
2 Minutes of Walking (3.0-4.0)

1 Min of Running (6.0 - 8.8)
30 Sec of Sprinting (9.0 - 12.0)
30 Sec of Walking (3.0-4.0)

Repeat 7 times

Monday - HIIT
Tuesday - Long Distance Run (5K)
Weds - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Thursday - HIIT
Friday - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Saturday - Long Distance Run (5K)
Sunday - Off


Try that two weeks...let me know if it helps improve your speed on the 5K.

Thanks metro! I'll implement this and see how it goes. One thing i'm worried about is how i'm performing in ball on Tuesdays and Sundays. I'm glad that Sunday is an "off" day but I think I need to take one on Tuesday as well because I was fried for my game last night and played awful. Aside from that I think this program is great. Do you think i'll be fine with this modification? :

Monday - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Tuesday - Off (basketball)
Weds - Long Distance Run (5K)
Thursday - HIIT
Friday - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Saturday - Long Distance Run (5K)
Sunday - Off (basketball)

Just as a note I also do Leg Workouts on Monday (back squats, extentions, calf raises) and Friday (front squat, box jumps, glute ham raises). I like the idea of jumprope on these days as extra "plyo" work.

metrocard
Oct 18, 2012, 04:04
Crossfit takes so much on the central nervous system, is a randomized non-system of training. It’s basically a set of random workouts that are high intensity circuit based workouts.

I'm not trying to bash it, but as a trainer my job to care for the health and wellness of my clients.
Injuries happen so I have to examine the dangers and the benefits of the exercise or program. If the dangers outweighs the benefits, we're not doing it.

Crossfit marketers promise better results with less time commitment, which in today’s “busy” world is probably the number one selling point for many products or ideas, I do this also. If you’ve ever watched late night infomercials, you might start to see some similarities…crossfit training creates an acidic environment in the body that actually leads to the degradation of coordination.

Training isn’t a random collection of hard workouts. Logical sequence and progression is training. If there’s no periodization, then you can expect to get exactly what you trained for, random results. Different training methods for different goals. Individualization.

If you’ve been in the coaching business long enough you know that hard stupid work doesn’t get you anywhere. You can’t just do work that is painful just because it hurts and expect to get better. The trained athletes are pretty good at recruiting more and more fibers as they get closer to fatigue. The untrained, not so much.

I've been injured before (a concussion), it's a terrible setback and anyone who recovers from an injury back to full shape is a hero.

I still try Cross Fit because it's fun, but beyond that, if I'm training seriously...CrossFit isn't apart of my gameplan.

I come to find out one of the CrossFit fanatics on my facebook hurt his back badly and has to resort to the leg press machine for 3 months. Ouch.

As for road work, it's a must for me.
Why? I'm a boxer, so my goal to have a strong aerobic system.
Some of the most successful boxers of history always had great roadwork routins, 5-8 miles, even 12 miles sometimes.
I run 5 miles in the morning because I need energy throughout the day to bike to work, train clients, instruct classes, train myself, bike to boxing, boxing for 2-3 hours, then bike to work and do the same thing at work and then bike home to finally rest. Doing 8+ miles on the road would leave my legs stringy throughout the day.

I feel like sprints are an essential part of a routine, if you are running and you pace yourself; the benefits of adding a sprint every 2-3 minutes is great.

Sprinters have excellent physiques but also excellent body movements, their movements are beautiful and their coordination is great at changing paces and turning up the gear. That's a great skill to have, I try to work on it bit and bit; I'm not elite but I try to give it my best.

With all the stuff I do, I earned a nickname "Mr. Stamina". Sometimes I feel surprised when I'm tired, I've built my endurance to a high level. Now only if I can build my boxing skills to that same level I'll be a happy guy :lol:



Sorry for the delayed response my man.

This workout is a great example. I'm honestly not sure what it is accomplishing. I believe you should only do things that have a clear purpose for WHY you are doing them as part of your fitness program. It seems you take the same approach and have the ability to apply it to people, individually, from exercise to recovery to nutrition.

Personally, I would only do that type of workout occasionally. And I view it more as a mental toughening routine. It's good to sometimes push yourself mentally and fight through extreme fatigue. It helps especially in a combat sport. But I think there are easier and better ways to achieve this, vs cns burning killers.

For a guy like yourself, already a high level athlete, or the dude in the video, I think it's a fine workout. However! :) I still wouldn't do it if I was playing sports actively, or my overall program already had built in mechanisms that already accomplish what this workout seeks to (minus the risks).

You can just imagine the majority of people who perform "bad ass" workouts like this from cross fit, and how poor they likely look doing it, and the high injury and recovery killing elements that they get smacked with.

To many people who even survive cf, just become good at cf. Hence it gets cult like. And I know some ppl like this who legit get gassed playing a random game of pickup ball bx their cns is so perpetually fried.

You mentioned performance and peak performance in your last sentence. And that's exactly it. From a true athlete, to a normal dude who wants the energy to bang his girl all night and feel constant vitality in day to day living and be able to rise to challenges.

On subject of cf style routines like what u did, I love them conceptually. To me nothing is more fun for cardio and strength-endurance than two things:

Hitting the heavy bag, and doing cross fit style combination routines...But i keep them to ten minutes maximum, and building them around exercises that I know are useful to my goals, and that won't rape my cns and recovery.

But it's crazy how cf workouts can destroy a cns. And the better the athlete the more risk too. Can destroy weeks if not many months of progression and planning.

What's ur take on road work metro? Traditional long duration running, vs sprinting, vs sport specific stuff (heavy bag or shadow boxing routines for cardiovascular benefits) etc.


Wtf are those lunatic swings on the pull up bar?


Core activation.


Thanks metro! I'll implement this and see how it goes. One thing i'm worried about is how i'm performing in ball on Tuesdays and Sundays. I'm glad that Sunday is an "off" day but I think I need to take one on Tuesday as well because I was fried for my game last night and played awful. Aside from that I think this program is great. Do you think i'll be fine with this modification? :

Monday - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Tuesday - Off (basketball)
Weds - Long Distance Run (5K)
Thursday - HIIT
Friday - Jumprope (15 minutes)
Saturday - Long Distance Run (5K)
Sunday - Off (basketball)

Just as a note I also do Leg Workouts on Monday (back squats, extentions, calf raises) and Friday (front squat, box jumps, glute ham raises). I like the idea of jumprope on these days as extra "plyo" work.


I think for you since you're basically on the athlete level and you play ball 2-3 times a week, jumproping is an excellent addition to your program.

Nate Archibald use to jumprope for 45mins to 60 mins before a game. Jump roping is great for the body and heres why:
The Jumprope teaches you how to use your legs efficiently: movement, coordination, timing, agility and speed. More efficient movements save you energy and you get less tired. When you play your games of basketball, you feel your stamina is timeless and you'll be able to preform at a higher level with an increase of stamina. I cannot run without using my arms and I cannot punch without using my legs, just like you can't shoot without using your legs and you can't run and shuffle without using your arms. Once you get a feel for how body movements works, you'll see why there is no "upper body" or "lower body", there is simply one "body" The lower body is not a separate entity from your upper body. When we walk, our arms naturally move. Does that make sense?
The jump rope is fast and constant which is very similar to how you would use your legs during a fight. For fighters, Jumprope > Squat. Doing squats will never be as good; squats aren’t done fast enough & never get to hundreds of repetitions.

These are just my thoughts, not facts or researched enough to claimed this as the truth. I just try my best to make it logical as possible. I feel we'll be better in all components of fitness if we treat the body as one piece instead of cut it down into different parts.

metrocard
Oct 18, 2012, 04:20
Some awesome videos holmes.

I like the thick bar training one a lot. Speaking of thick bar training, I worked out a lot in Russia past month. Lots of school yard style workouts. Low tech, but high effect. I've noticed a lot of similarities between these eastern euro style training modalities, and the growing phenomena of like...urban bodyweight/playground/prison style workouts. It's getting hyped up too much, and too much race being injected into the discussion, but the power of true body science can be profound even when applied in basic, low tech ways.

You just need to know the fundamentals of exercise and be already well trained yourself and have great body awareness (verrrrrry underrated) , or have someone with the expertise and talent to coach and train the right way, on an individual level while still applying overall principles and logic into individual situations.

Imo, the best trainers and coaches operate somewhat like that. I consider myself very knowledgeable and experienced with exercise, but i would also call myself a hack trainer. A great workout partner and gym buddy to ppl already well trained, but a poor trainer myself. (compared to legit ones....many trainers are just horrible, and regurgitate Muscle Mag bull****).


Yea, as a trainer I've met a lot of trainers. I'd say over a thousand, especially living in NYC.

I get discriminated against because I'm young and these guys assume I know only to what I've been exposed to.

I'm an avid researcher and a critical thinker, I've reformed my methods so many times I don't really have a base or style, kinda like to keep my methods well rounded to answer and fit every component of fitness. I found the best results that way with my clients, plus clients become more involved when you give them a series of multiple exercises that differentiate but progress one's fitness. If a person learns a new skill such as jumproping or throwing a boxing combination, they're more engaged as oppose to a trainer watching them and counting repetitions of a man-made exercise machine and doing simplistic exercises such as the bench press or bicep curl(not dissing these exercises but they're very common)

I can't hate on these trainers because I understand they're just trying to do two things. Make money and feed their ego. Sometimes it's one or the other.

You meet a lot of guys at gyms who can't wait to go up to someone and blab away pseudofacts they hold strongly to and think their methods are the best to date. Ballooning the ego is a priority for these guys, especially if they don't get much results from their clients.

I'm a results guy. I can't talk about it until I see it happen. I'm proud to help a lot of people not only change their physique but their attitude and lifestyle; more positivity and blocking out the bull**** that interferes with their progress. I've reached out to a lot of people beyond my sessions where I'm not paid for once the hour is over, but it's not about the money or the ego. When you help someone get something they want so bad and you made a difference in that progress; it's a priceless feeling. It doesn't boost my ego or fill up my wallet, it's just makes my environment a healthier place for me. It does give me a warm feeling inside (as faggotity as that may sound), but that's why I been doing this since I was 19 and I'm 24 now.

I feel like you become a good trainer when you put all the bull**** in the toliet and flush it, you have a clear mind open to new ideas and hungry for research and logic, and you naturally care for your client's health and well being, not just their physique and weight loss.



XxW39GWvWQM

Now that is how a gym is suppose to look like and how a trainer is suppose to be.

All components of fitness answered! Yes!

metrocard
Dec 04, 2012, 14:21
Today I was running at 12 miles per hour. Not bad since I haven't ran since September. 5K run through Pelham Pkwy/Williamsbridge Rd in the Boogie. Duration: 25:39(2:34PM-300PM) Calories burned: 386. My next goal is try to get 5K in 20 minutes by March/April.

orangeblobman
Dec 05, 2012, 06:38
That's a nice 5k time.

Started doing dumbbell snatches!!

http://www.usawa.com/USAWA%20Uploads/2011/06/MyersDBSnatch.jpg

Finally found a lift for that power component, and it's easy to learn and fun to do!!

Plan is to be dunking by February.

I started touching rim from squats and deadlifts and other strength work, now with the snatches, I'll be throwing them down.

Love the snatch.

http://blog.womenshealthmag.com/fitness/files/2012/07/power-lifting-6.jpg

I'll tell you what, Metro, I'm gonna do a 5K after two months of snatching and see what it did for my time. My guess is that I'm gonna get 28 at least, just from snatching and squats and deadlifts, without any running training.

That's the challenge.

metrocard
Dec 06, 2012, 12:19
Well, I haven't squated or done any olympic lifts as religiously I did them in the past. Maybe once a week at most and not even heavy stuff because I spend a lot of time on my coordination, agility, and flexibility at boxing. I basically do a 5K sprint twice a week and do HIIT on the treatmill 2-3 times a week.

orangeblobman
Dec 06, 2012, 18:26
what's your high snatch?

metrocard
Dec 08, 2012, 02:41
lol, why did you delete your comment?

orange, I was maxed out running...it's not a literally sprint, but me running at 75% of my max. I run a 5K in 24-25 mins.

Do you have to be a troll about everything?

My high snatch? What does that mean?

Are you trying to ask me what's my maximal amount of weight that I snatched? It's unclear what you're presenting here.

For snatching, I only snatch with a kettlebell. Never maxed out before, no need to.

orangeblobman
Dec 08, 2012, 08:17
What's your max KB snatch

metrocard
Dec 08, 2012, 12:17
What's your max KB snatch

I never maxed out before.
I do sets of 4 X 12 on each arm or 4 X 12 on double kettlebells.

metrocard
Dec 09, 2012, 16:06
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v=Cst-WhOv-ok

smokes
Dec 15, 2012, 15:04
I'd love some advice from our fitness experts how to go about gaining strength/muscle.

I can't weigh myself right now but last time I did I weighed around 65kg, yes I'm a skinny dude, with a slightly unsightly belly :lol:

I posted my diet in the diet thread but I may as well reiterate everything here.

Breakfast - Banana, Protein shake (skimmed milk)
Mid morning - Protein shake (skimmed)
Lunch - Tuna + light mayo (sometimes in a sandwich)
Mid afternoon - Protein shake (skimmed)
Dinner - Chicken and boiled vegetables (broccoli, carrot, cabbage, pumpkin)
Late night - Protein shake (skimmed)

The protein I use is a 100% whey. Sometimes I mix in a scoop of weight gainer supplement which is more carb based.

I'm doing workouts 3-4 days per week. I workout with dumbbells.

3 sets bicep curls x 10
3 sets bench press x 10
3 sets explosive press up x 5
3 sets press up x 10
3 sets squats x 10
3 sets dumbbell lunges x 10

Something like that, it's kinda improvised.

Also every day I spent 30min-1hr outside my house shooting hoops, running around a bit (light cardio).

My aim is to gain upper body strength/muscle and lose fat... I constantly hear mixed feedback about whether these two goals can be achieved at the same time.

I'm confident in all my exercise form apart from the squat which I have a very hard time with, especially due to my knees being creaky.

I'd love feedback and critique from you guys about where to change things in my diet/fitness routine.

I think I might also be lactose intolerant/milk allergy which ****ing sucks...

metrocard
Dec 15, 2012, 15:28
4 X 12 with 30-45 seconds of rest in between.
Try it for 4 weeks.
I will change it up for you.

Snack on smuckers peanut butter throughout the day, I will come back to this thread and post some foods that will help you in your strength gains.



I'd love some advice from our fitness experts how to go about gaining strength/muscle.

I can't weigh myself right now but last time I did I weighed around 65kg, yes I'm a skinny dude, with a slightly unsightly belly :lol:

I posted my diet in the diet thread but I may as well reiterate everything here.

Breakfast - Banana, Protein shake (skimmed milk)
Mid morning - Protein shake (skimmed)
Lunch - Tuna + light mayo (sometimes in a sandwich)
Mid afternoon - Protein shake (skimmed)
Dinner - Chicken and boiled vegetables (broccoli, carrot, cabbage, pumpkin)
Late night - Protein shake (skimmed)

The protein I use is a 100% whey. Sometimes I mix in a scoop of weight gainer supplement which is more carb based.

I'm doing workouts 3-4 days per week. I workout with dumbbells.

3 sets bicep curls x 10
3 sets bench press x 10
3 sets explosive press up x 5
3 sets press up x 10
3 sets squats x 10
3 sets dumbbell lunges x 10

Something like that, it's kinda improvised.

Also every day I spent 30min-1hr outside my house shooting hoops, running around a bit (light cardio).

My aim is to gain upper body strength/muscle and lose fat... I constantly hear mixed feedback about whether these two goals can be achieved at the same time.

I'm confident in all my exercise form apart from the squat which I have a very hard time with, especially due to my knees being creaky.

I'd love feedback and critique from you guys about where to change things in my diet/fitness routine.

I think I might also be lactose intolerant/milk allergy which ****ing sucks...

smokes
Dec 15, 2012, 15:30
Got me some Sanitarium PB with no added salt or sugar, or any crap. Ingredients: Fresh roasted peanuts 96%, vegetable oils and stabiliser.

I should just eat it straight out the jar?

metrocard
Dec 16, 2012, 01:46
You may add some strawberry perserve jam for a little more taste. But yea, just take a couple spoonfulls or even help yourself to a sandwich everyday.

Since you're working out 4 times a week, you will gain weight but the added muscle will be the majority of it, thanks to the vitamins, good fats and protein in peanut butter.

I was going to recommend cotton cheese, but peanut butter is a little easier to eat.



Here's why Im saying this.

My ex-roommate was Pakistani, and dudes from India, Pakistan tend to be very skinny and have a hard time bulking up to their desire sized.

He was 5"11 and 135 lbs.

Within 6 months I helped him get up to 180lbs, and within a year he was at 190(which I thought was too much)

He worked out in a weird fashion which actually slowed the process and made his body looked distorted. He had flabby abs and a stronger upper body than lower body. He didn't follow my workout advice because he was into building strength in bench pressing and dumbbell curls...amateur type stuff.

Well, he did make changes on his diet (he drank too much milk, made his abs flabby and body soft).

What I want for you is just consistency for now.

Once your comfortable with controlling your decisions and being loyal to a routine, you can add some things in there because you now have a foundation of fitness in respect to your body and your gains.

From there, I'll present a new plan for you to continue increasing and gaining more results because doing the same thing over and over doesn't work forever as we know well...so, just enjoy what you're doing now.

A lot of good awaits in the future.

smokes
Dec 16, 2012, 02:25
Yeah, I'm not bothered with just having arms and chest. I wanna improve those areas but I want a strong core, back and lower body also. It bugs me that squats and deadlifts are out of my comfort zone because I don't know any other effective exercises for those areas, with dumbbells anyway.

Thanks for the advice, if you can suggest any exercises that can substitute for the above that would be sweet. Other than that I'll stick with this for the next month.

Only thing I'm thinking of changing is my supplements, the protein stuff I have now is pretty average I think. We have a company here that does a lot of NZ made supplements which cut out all the crap, like literally everything.

In NZ we are not allowed to use hormones on our cows to make them produce more milk like in other countries, so these supplements are free of those hormones. They also have no artificial ingredients whatsoever and have an extremely high protein to carb to fat ratio.

I believe it's in the region of 26g protein to 2g carb 1g fat per serve. The only other things it contains is L-Glutamine and amino acids.

These supplements sound awesome, the only drawback is having such a low carb rate is unusual so I suppose I will have to increase my carb intake.

Apart from the protein supplements, are there any other supplements you recommend? When I look around it seems everyone is taking half a dozen different things... Pre Workout formulas... Fat burners... Is all this stuff actually necessary?

metrocard
Dec 16, 2012, 10:14
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smokes
Dec 16, 2012, 13:36
Damn that looks like it could go so wrong :lol:

Are you suggesting those for back/core replacement exercises? I could try it with my dumbbells.... Extremely carefully haha...

BTW, do you think 30min-1hr playing basketball 1 on 1 or just solo is suitable cardio? I'm not a big fan of running (knees again).