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  1. #46
    Veteran tiger0330's Avatar
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    Frank has upped his averages up to 7.5 pts on 42% shooting since moving to the 2 for the past 6 games. I'd like to see Mudiay at the 2 and him at PG to see how that looks, lot of nice things being said about Nits but we're still not winning games.

  2. #47
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    Originally Posted by tiger0330
    Frank has upped his averages up to 7.5 pts on 42% shooting since moving to the 2 for the past 6 games. I'd like to see Mudiay at the 2 and him at PG to see how that looks, lot of nice things being said about Nits '' but we're still not winning games.''
    thank god that winning games is low on the knicks agenda....

  3. #48
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    Originally Posted by tiger0330
    Frank has upped his averages up to 7.5 pts on 42% shooting since moving to the 2 for the past 6 games. I'd like to see Mudiay at the 2 and him at PG to see how that looks, lot of nice things being said about Nits but we're still not winning games.
    I'd say right now our main two priorities are to develop our young players and find out which players have a future with this team next season (and beyond). The winning part is not really part of the equation. Don't get me wrong, I can see the benefit of our players learning to win games and having a strong finish to the season (e.g. like the 49ers did to end the 2017 NFL season when they made Jimmy Garropollo their starting quarterback), but in our situation we are very unlikely to make the play offs (it would require the 8th seed plus Detroit and Charlotte going on bad runs that allow us to catch them and get in front), and as such we might be better trying to focus our attempts on improving our draft position rather than a desperate attempt to make the play offs.

    As for Frank and Mudiay, I would not starting swapping positions for them because they seem to be showing some positive signs at the 2 and 1 respectively. When we drafted Frank there was talk that he could end up playing shooting guard rather than point guard in the future. If he starts to become more assertive in an off the ball role, then it would make sense to give him a run at SG until the end of the season to see if that is where his future lies. It also allows the team to continue to give Mudiay and Burke the opportunities to prove if they are the future for us at PG. Then you can look forward to the draft, if Frank is making a case to be our SG of the future but our PG position is still questionable, then there is always the chance we could draft Collin Sexton to be our PG because he should be under consideration in that 8 to 10 range.

  4. #49
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    Originally Posted by Mike1989
    I'd say right now our main two priorities are to develop our young players and find out which players have a future with this team next season (and beyond). The winning part is not really part of the equation.
    we have been looking toward the future since 1973.... when do we get into the future is 'now' mentally ???

  5. #50
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    Originally Posted by paris401
    we have been looking toward the future since 1973.... when do we get into the future is 'now' mentally ???
    Like I said, I can see why fans want to see us compete in what's left of this season and do a 49ers, but do we have enough on this team right now to go on a winning run? It's debatable. We should win some games but not enough to change our fate of another season without play off basketball.

    A further question is do we have enough pieces on this roster to state with confidence that we are one or two moves from play off basketball and ultimately contention? Fingers crossed KP comes back strong, but he's really the only player on our team sheet with their name in pen rather than pencil.

    There is really no shortcut to contention. We need to be patient and hope that we have a strong draft and off season. Arguably without KP for most of next season we will be in a similar position to this season, so we'll probably have another top ten pick. If we are lucky then Frank and KP plus our next two first rounders will form an impressive quartet that can lead us to contention. That's without taking into account Hardaway and any other existing players being part of the solution, any trades, or acquisitions in free agency.

    It's been a long time since a title. But we tried the quick route with Melo and failed. So perhaps now is time to try the patient route? Unless LeBron wants to come to the Knicks then let the spending commence!

  6. #51
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    Originally Posted by tiger0330
    Frank has upped his averages up to 7.5 pts on 42% shooting since moving to the 2 for the past 6 games. I'd like to see Mudiay at the 2 and him at PG to see how that looks, lot of nice things being said about Nits but we're still not winning games.
    Heres a look at the future .....

    Frank Knits & Burke vs Lonzo Ball & Isiaih
    Rubio & Mitchell vs Fox & Shumpert

  7. #52
    Veteran tiger0330's Avatar
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    Good article on the kid. Interesting that he's grown an inch and doctors say he may be 6'7" when he's done. He's behind, body, shot,aggressiveness so it may take years, progress is the key for the Knicks to have the patience.


    NBA Insiders Wonder If Frank Ntilikina Can Be More Than a Lockdown Defender

    NEW YORK — It's been an up-and-down rookie season for Frank Ntilikina. Selected eighth overall by the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] in last year's draft, the 19-year-old has at times flashed the talent and skills that made him such a tantalizing prospect. He's also looked timid and ordinary, as evidenced by the paltry 5.5 points and 3.1 assists he's averaged per game.
    Such is life as an [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] rookie, especially when said rookie is the second-youngest player in the league.
    But this is also what makes Ntilikina so difficult to evaluate at this point. Rookie seasons are supposed to provide answers; Ntilikina's has shown promises, but it's also generated myriad questions.
    Is his ceiling that of a reserve, starter or All-Star? Is he better suited to play point guard or off the ball? Is his passiveness on the court an innate characteristic that can't be cured or just the result of him being a kid from France who's still trying to find his footing in this country and league?
    Those around the NBA who are bullish on Ntilikina believe in him primarily because they feel he can evolve into one of the game's top perimeter defenders. He has all the attributes teams look for in their desperate search for players flexible enough to keep up with today's space-and-pace game. As one league executive put it: "He fits the positionless basketball model that the league is adapting."

    Ntilikina is listed at 6'5", but he's also grown an inch over the season and has been told by doctors that another inch could be coming. That, combined with his seven-foot wingspan, allows him to lock down both guards and wings. Case in point: He's big enough to switch on screens and quick and long enough to fight over them and bother ball-handlers from behind. It's no coincidence that the Knicks force more turnovers and hold opponents to nearly five fewer points per 100 possessions with Ntilikina on the floor, per [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].
    It's on the offensive end of the floor where Ntilikina has struggled most. He never profiled as a shoot-first rim-seeker, but there's a middle ground he's failed to discover, a tendency that a second NBA executive, one who scouted him in France said is part of his DNA. "He's passive," the executive said. "It's who he is."
    Ntilikina rarely attacks the basket and too often settles for pull-up jumpers off pick-and-rolls. The 4.3 drives he averages per game, according to [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], is in the same ballpark as sharpshooting gunners like Patty Mills and Joe Harris. Ntilikina could get away with some of these decisions if he were a knockdown shooter, but he's drilled just 31.9 percent of his triples and only 31.0 percent of his mid-range looks, according to [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].
    Yet there are reasons to believe all these problems can be cured.
    For one, he's been solid on spot-up three-pointers—32.8 percent, per [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]—and, as an Eastern Conference scout said, "his shot's not broken." Bumping his efficiency up to, say, around 37 percent, would morph Ntilikina into a valuable three-and-D guy even if he doesn't improve his off-the-dribble game. Combine that with a basketball IQ and court vision that scouts love and you get a valuable player who could contribute on any team.
    Also, he's slowly developing the footwork and comfort to finish in traffic, though that will be helped most by the strength he'll inevitably gain.

    But Ntilikina will never reach his ceiling if he doesn't become more aggressive. Three-and-D guys are nice, but that's not what the Knicks had in mind when they picked him over high-scoring guards like Donovan Mitchell and Dennis Smith Jr. Even if Ntilikina winds up settling in as an off-guard, where he's spent the majority of his minutes since the Knicks signed Trey Burke and acquired Emmanuel Mudiay, he'll still need to become more aggressive and learn to attack the rim to truly justify that high draft slot.
    Perhaps playing him at the 2 takes the ball out of his hands at times. But that doesn't mean he won't ever be tasked with creating on the bounce, whether in secondary pick-and-rolls or off kick-out passes. Teams like the [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] show the days of backcourts featuring two guards with distinct roles are no more.
    And so while so much attention has recently been paid to whether Ntilikina projects more as a point guard or shooting guard, the smart move for the Knicks would be to allow other factors—from the draft to available free agents—to determine his future position.
    "I can play with the ball or without the ball," Ntilikina told Bleacher Report recently. "Nowadays you see lots of backcourts with two point guards."
    The Knicks would also be wise to loosen the leash they've kept tied around Ntilikina. It's not just that he's played only 20.9 minutes per game—a number that should be closer to 25. The team's main failure has been not helping Ntilikina learn to play without a fear of making mistakes. Watching Nitilikina is often like watching a high school player scared of upsetting the coach and getting yanked. Part of that is his personality, but, with that being the case, the onus falls on the Knicks to push him to overcome that.
    "Point guard is a sensitive position; it's easy for a young player to worry about getting other guys involved and pleasing the coach," the first league executives said. "I think that's happened a bit with Frank."
    The injection of young point guards into the roster certainly didn't help Ntilikina feel more ease about his position within the team, even if management remains high on his future. As has been previously reported [Only registered and activated users can see links. ], the Knicks did turn away multiple trade proposals involving Ntilikina prior to the deadline, according to league sources. But player development is about managing feelings and boosting a player's confidence almost as much as it's about improving skills. With Ntilikina, that was not an area the Knicks emphasized this year.
    "It's really hard to develop during the season because you don't have as much time to have practice as you would," Knicks vice president of player development and G League operations Craig Robinson told reporters recently. "The more games you have, the more development you'll see over the summer."
    The good news is this means there's a lot of room for improvement—and that the Knicks have a plan to foster that development. Whether that leads to a leap for Ntilikina is anyone's guess. But the Knicks would be wise to devote more of his second year in the NBA to finding out how much of his potential is real.

  8. #53
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
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    Good article. Pretty much hammers home a point I just made in another thread, about how I would coach Knits. This failure is on Horn. Obviously, based on the individual, you don’t coach Knits the same way as a Burke, THjr, or Mudiay.

    No excuses now, with playoffs out of the picture. Team has gone 1-17 last 18 games. Start Knits, tell him to focus solely on shooting and penetrating.

    Knits is young onnon the verge of being a high IQ, savvy, 6”7 willing defender and passer. It may not be value for the 8th pick, but he should be a valuable role player here.... if not, the team failed him.

    It’ll be a big offseason for him. Based on his growth as a player... that’s when the book will start getting ink written in it.

    There teams out there that will still trade for him and his “potential” means NY has at least 1 more season to wait and decide. Because, even another mediocre season won’t deter his supporters. This team next year he’s still a 20 yr-old developmental project, at worst. Plus, teams that like him probably feel NY isn’t helpful by his game.

    So, we just need to sit back and wait and determine around Jan next year what sort of player Knits appears grooming himself to become.

    Mitchell is having a fantastic year. But Brandon Jennings had a good rookie season. Let’s see how athletic DM is in 3 years, after all the NBA abuse. Still a long way from deciding finally who was the best option at 8...

  9. #54
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    Knits just need to play combo-gard in a steady lineup each game having center Quinn, SF Troy, PG Burke, and a real NBA PF that name isn't KP Lance Beasley !!!

  10. #55
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    He should watch tapes of this all day and night, good stuff from the kid


  11. #56
    Veteran tiger0330's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Broadway
    He should watch tapes of this all day and night, good stuff from the kid

    @Knicksfilmschool loves the kid. Dave Bliss the Knicks development coach said they work with him all the time on driving the lane and being aggressive and we're seeing the results of that. Like Mafra said too early to label the kid bust or star but the Knicks have to have patience which has always been in short supply with the Knicks, bringing in Mudiay and Trey tells you that he may have a short leash in NY.

  12. #57
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
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    Hopefully, Knicks do a better development job grooming Frank than they did with Shump. They strike me as similar...

    I think Frank has lots of room to grow... I just don’t know if being “aggressive” and ultra-competitive is in his DNA.

  13. #58
    Veteran tiger0330's Avatar
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    I made a comment about Calderon having a higher motor despite being 17 years older. We'll see, going to find out how hungry the kid is pretty soon. Goes home for a couple of weeks to visit family and comes back to the states to train and play summer league and elsewhere, he shows he wants to be better. Goes home and thinks he can get better in France, I question his desire.
    Last edited by tiger0330; Mar 29, 2018 at 06:55.

  14. #59
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    Originally Posted by tiger0330
    @Knicksfilmschool loves the kid. Dave Bliss the Knicks development coach said they work with him all the time on driving the lane and being aggressive and we're seeing the results of that. Like Mafra said too early to label the kid bust or star but the Knicks have to have patience which has always been in short supply with the Knicks, bringing in Mudiay and Trey tells you that he may have a short leash in NY.

    Another 1


  15. #60
    Veteran tiger0330's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Broadway
    Another 1

    They showed Dave Bliss on the bench after he made this shot and he looked like a proud dad, grinning and probably thinking "thats my boy, I taught him that". The kid gets as many blocked at the rim as he makes but they don't show those on highlights. The kid is ours for the next 4 years, I don't think you trade him because he's young and can develop but his best chance to make it in the league is as a spot up 3 pt shooter that can defend but he's got to work on that shooting.

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