Page 43 of 53 FirstFirst ... 132337383940414243444546474849 ... LastLast
Results 631 to 645 of 795
  1. #631
    12th man
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    12,006
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    There is no time for an interview, a Minnesota Timberwolves PR person says as she whisks Karl-Anthony Towns through the crowd at the Thomas and Mack Center. Towns is in Las Vegas for the 2019 NBA Summer League, where he’s in high demand and in a serious hurry to meet with Wolves coach Ryan Saunders. Even NBA commissioner Adam Silver merits nothing but a brief pause and a handshake.
    Towns, yet another lottery pick from Kentucky, was the 2016 NBA Rookie of the Year and is a two-time All-Star for the Timberwolves at the age of 23. Wearing dark sunglasses inside a basketball arena, he projects every bit of the superstar he is.
    So, here goes nothing: “Hey, Karl, this story is about Kenny Payne!”
    The magic words. Towns stops in his tracks, spins around, flips up his shades and flashes a wide smile brighter than any neon on the Strip.
    “I always got time for KP!” he says to the reporter.
    Practically unprompted, Towns launches into a lengthy explanation of how Payne taught him every skill necessary to chase greatness at the next level. Then he boils down the role Payne has filled for the last nine years on John Calipari’s staff at Kentucky.
    “KP is one of the best development coaches in the world,” Towns says. “KP is the horse beneath the jockey driving Kentucky basketball.”
    During his nine seasons in Lexington, Payne has guided nine Kentucky big men to become NBA lottery picks, including No. 1 overall picks Towns and Anthony Davis.
    Before battling in the NBA, No. 1 overall picks Towns (32) and Davis both learned from Payne in Lexington. (Jeffrey Becker/USA TODAY Sports)
    “When I got to Kentucky, I couldn’t do a post move. I was very, very raw,” says Davis, who’s listed as “Baby Giraffe” in Payne’s phone. “I was like a baby giraffe that just came out of the womb — the way they walk, wobbling around on their skinny legs.”
    Payne, who at 6-foot-8 still cuts an imposing figure, got busy building both Davis’ body and confidence in the paint, sharing basic principles and a go-to move: Create a wide base, hold your ground, secure the ball and dribble once, spin back into an unblockable right-handed jump hook.
    “It became my thing, and it all came from him,” says Davis, a six-time all-star who’s now with the Lakers. “We would work it and work it. He’d push me around with these big pads and we’d drill it all day and all night until I got it right. KP is why I’m able to play so well in the paint now.”
    “Kenny is the backbone,” adds Warriors center Willie Cauley-Stein. “He keeps that **** tight.”
    Hell, even the guards love him.
    “He’s a hidden gem in Kentucky basketball,” says Suns star Devin Booker. “When people talk about the program, maybe you don’t hear about KP. But if you know, you know.”
    Such universal love from his former players says a lot about just how valuable Payne is to Kentucky, but it also raises questions for both the program and its prized assistant: How much longer can the Wildcats keep him? What happens to Kentucky when he’s gone? And why hasn’t another high-level program made him a head coach?

    Payne is hesitant, his finger lingering over the button, as he stands just off-court at Kentucky’s practice facility on a summer evening. He winces, as if feeling the victim’s pain before he inflicts it.
    “Are you in shape?”
    “How are your knees?”
    “Are you sure you want to do this?”
    The visitor nods. He’s here this night to see what all the fuss is about, why five-star recruits flock to this gym to be molded by Payne’s famous workouts and why millionaire alumni return for tune-ups even years after they’ve become NBA stars. Big Henry, the mechanical monster lurking in a corner just off the court, holds some of those answers. It is legendary: a super-sized treadmill that Payne has given a human name so it can take on a life of its own.
    “Ohhhhhhh, God, yes,” says Davis, the first pick in the 2012 NBA Draft. “I remember Big Henry. Gruesome. Very gruesome.”
    Henry damn near killed James Young a couple of summers ago when the 2014 first-rounder came to Lexington looking to rejuvenate his career. Young lasted 20 minutes before his eyes rolled back in his head and Henry spit him 10 feet off the back of the conveyor belt, witnesses say.
    Julius Randle, a five-year NBA veteran who just signed a $63 million contract with the Knicks, called his mother recently to brag he had finally completed Payne’s treadmill workout. He first tried in the summer of 2013.
    Payne makes it sound simple enough: two-minute jog, one-minute sprint, repeat. Only, his jog is most people’s sprint: 8 mph. His sprint is most people’s run for their life: 11 mph. And there is no walking. Just this rigorous rotation of fast and faster, over and over, for … wait, how long does this go on?
    “Forty-five minutes and then we start the basketball workout,” Payne says, his wince turning to a devilish grin.
    He’s going to enjoy this. Payne pushes the button and Henry lurches to life.
    Payne demands that Washington and other ex-Cats sweat every detail, from feet to fingertips. (Kyle Tucker/The Athletic)
    Five minutes later, PJ Washington walks into the gym just in time to see the visitor tap out. The 12th pick in the 2019 NBA Draft, the real reason Payne is here tonight, laughs at the spectacle.
    “We’ve all been there,” Washington says, speaking for the parade of pros who’ve spent a year or two in Lexington on their way to the league. Their images, on poster-sized NBA trading cards, wrap almost all the way around the Joe Craft Center gym, interrupted only by Kentucky’s eight national championship banners.
    “This is where it started for all of us,” Washington says. “We all got better from KP. He understands the league, played in the league, basically knows everyone in the league, and his work translates.”

    Payne’s reputation for preparing players for the NBA certainly appeals to blue-chip recruits with an eye on joining the league sooner rather than later. But that doesn’t mean all of them are jumping at their first chance for a payday.
    Flashback to 2012, when a new prospect, and project, lands in Lexington. Willie Cauley-Stein, a 7-footer from Kansas who likes art and fashion, is covered head-to-toe in tattoos and only chose basketball from a long list of sports he played in high school because, well, people thought he might make some money at it one day. He’s ranked the 43rd-best recruit in the country, which means he has plenty of potential but is far from a sure-fire lottery pick. Truth be told, he’d rather read poetry than study game tape.
    Payne loves a challenge and wastes no time testing the eccentric rookie. During a preseason workout, he asks Cauley-Stein to catch a weighted medicine ball off the bounce and dunk it — 15 times. The former wide receiver snatches the ball, bounds off the floor and jams over and over with ease. He is pleased with himself. Payne asks for 10 more. Then 10 more. No problem. “I can do anything,” Cauley-Stein recalls thinking. But Payne is not done. “Now give me 60.”
    The towering and now teetering freshman realizes this is a test and resolves himself not to give up. So he dunks that medicine ball, fast and furious at first and then slower and softer as he reaches 40 slams. He can barely drop the ball over the rim, and the gym begins to spin. He takes a knee. He vomits. And vomits some more. While he heaves, Payne stands over him and smiles.
    “He could tell that I’m different and he tried to break me,” Cauley-Stein says. “I was like, Nope, not today.”
    The freshman drags himself to his feet and completes the final 20 dunks.
    “You can’t break me, but just the love in him trying was so different,” Cauley-Stein says. “I never really worked before that, never really had to. Kenny taught me how.”
    Payne has the rare ability to be both bad cop and good. Inside the gym, he’s unmerciful. Outside, he’s Uncle Kenny.
    “He is a great listener,” Calipari says. “It’s hard when you’re the head coach for players to walk in your office and sit down and BS. They seem intimidated. They shouldn’t be, but it’s one of the issues I’ve had at times: They see me bigger than I am. Sometimes they need an ear. And the guy they know cares, they know is there for them, that’ll tell them the truth, is Kenny Payne. He’s been vital for these players. Vital.”
    A counterbalance to the intense Calipari, Payne makes sure to remain approachable for the Wildcats players. (Mark Zerof/USA Today Sports)
    As a sophomore, Cauley-Stein totals more combined blocks and steals (150) than any player in school history not named Anthony Davis. Payne sees that his one-time project needs to declare for the NBA Draft that spring. Raised by a single mother and his grandparents, Cauley-Stein has done enough to become a millionaire. “Nah, I love you too much to leave you,” he jokes with Payne, as he has all season.
    As the team prepares to leave for the 2014 NCAA Tournament, Cauley-Stein writes a message on the whiteboard in Payne’s office. “I love you too much to leave you,” it says. “So I’m coming back.” Then he pushes the board into Payne’s closet and closes the door. No one will see it until after Cauley-Stein breaks his ankle in the Sweet 16 against Louisville, until after the season ends with a loss to UConn in the title game.
    Cauley-Stein keeps his word and returns for his junior year to earn consensus first-team All-America honors and a National Defensive Player of the Year award. Kentucky, 38-1, reaches another Final Four, then the 43rd-ranked recruit from 2012 becomes the sixth pick in the 2015 NBA Draft.
    “Kenny will go in the gym with you at 3 in the morning, leave his whole family, just to help you,” Cauley-Stein says. “When a dude wants to invest all that time in you when he could be at home with his own family, you gotta return that. You just got to.”

    It is the summer of 1989. Payne thinks he knows what it means to be a first-round pick as he flies across the country with his college teammate Pervis Ellison. The best friends have just been selected in the NBA Draft, Ellison first overall and Payne 19th, and they set up in Malibu, Calif., to get game-ready.
    Early in the trip, they bump into the NBA’s ultimate big-man litmus test, Hakeem Olajuwon. The future Hall of Famer asks them to extend their trip and work out with him. Those 10 days still impact Ellison and Payne 30 years later.
    “We got to see how hard, how diligent, how specific his workouts were,” Payne says. “Here’s what I learned: You might trick them into drafting you because you had a great college career or one great season, but once you’re in the NBA, you better work so hard that you can handle whatever the game throws at you.
    “When I think about Anthony and Julius and Willie and Karl,” Payne says, “I go back to those 10 days I spent working out with and competing against Olajuwon.”
    Competing might be an exaggeration.
    “The Dream was amazing,” says Ellison. “I’m this hot-shot, No. 1 pick, thinking I’m this and that, and it was a total mismatch. That was the first dose of reality: This is a business and you have to take it serious, because this is grown men here.”
    In retrospect, Payne might assign too much significance to his encounter with the legend. A Parade All-American and Mississippi’s Mr. Basketball in 1985, the 6-foot-8 Payne arrived at Louisville already an unusually focused young man.
    “He had a plan, a whole approach about what he needed to improve and how he was going to improve it,” Ellison says. “The rest of us learned that at Louisville, but Kenny had a routine when he got there.”
    Yet for all of his hard work while playing for the Cardinals, Payne does not make the short list of Denny Crum’s best players — Ellison, Darrell Griffith, Rodney McCray and Felton Spencer all went top-six in the draft. Crum, the Louisville icon and three-time national coach of the year, remembers Payne for other reasons.
    “If I was going to pick one on the team to succeed as a coach, it would’ve been him,” Crum says. “If you worked out with Kenny, he’d work your tail off, but he’d do the same for himself. That puts him ahead of others. John Calipari is lucky to have him, because you can see those guys he’s working with at Kentucky really emulate him.”

    Basketball has taken Payne around the world, and back again. A playing career that has spanned five continents ends in 2000, but all of those roads lead back to Louisville. While finishing his degree in sports administration and eyeing a coaching career, Payne launches a letter-writing, résumé-sending blitz to college programs and NBA franchises.
    “No responses,” he recalls. “Donuts.”
    But Louisville teammate Milt Wagner then gives Payne the break he needs. Wagner’s son Dajuan, the best high school player in the Class of 2000, is on the verge of signing with Calipari at Memphis. Wagner helps Payne get an invitation to an annual coaching clinic put on by Calipari and his longtime mentor, Pistons coach Larry Brown.
    “I never get a single phone call,” Payne says. “Then in that pivotal moment, Cal invites me and changes my life.”
    Payne’s current boss, Calipari, and his first boss, Brown, are both in the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame. (Brian Babineau/NBAE via Getty Images)
    Brown has heard good reports on Payne from his friends in the NBA and upon finally meeting him offers a priceless opportunity: an unpaid internship with the Pistons. Every Monday through Thursday, Payne chips away at his degree in Louisville before heading to Detroit to break down film for Brown from Thursday night through Sunday.
    In Detroit, Payne stays with one of two friends, Pistons star Richard “Rip” Hamilton and William “Worldwide Wes” Wesley, the famously well-connected basketball star-maker. Payne and Wesley go way back to the Louisville days, when Wesley had followed his buddy Milt Wagner from New Jersey to Kentucky and immediately hit it off with Payne. The two have called each other “my brother” ever since.
    So when Payne hears that Wesley supports a Detroit-based Nike grassroots program called The Family, Payne offers to work out some of its top players when Brown affords him the time.
    “I just admired the hell out of him,” Brown says of Payne, who he now puts in the same company as other protégés: Calipari, Gregg Popovich, Bill Self and Mark Turgeon. “I don’t know what separates these guys except that they care about kids and they’re not afraid to coach them. You could see Kenny had both those things right away.”
    Payne parlays his NBA internship and The Family connection into a job training some of the nation’s top high school stars at a Nike skills camp in Beaverton, Ore., which not only enhances his reputation as an elite workout guy but puts him on Ernie Kent’s radar. The Oregon Ducks coach hires him as an assistant in 2003 and Payne immediately helps build the nation’s No. 6 recruiting class — headlined by Malik Hairston, a McDonald’s All-American and former player for The Family. That group will form the core of a 2007 Elite Eight team.
    After that first class, though, the Ducks’ recruiting returns to normal. Over the next six years, their average recruiting ranking is 66th, mirroring the results on the court. Oregon goes 42-58 in the three seasons after that ’07 tournament run and Kent is fired. Not long after, the NCAA investigates Ducks players from the 2008 and ’09 teams for allegedly receiving improper benefits from agents. By May, Payne is on the move.

    Calipari had long wanted to add Payne to his staff, initially trying to lure him to Memphis from Oregon. But Memphis was an Adidas school, so before Calipari could approach Payne, he had to get the blessing of Nike CEO and Oregon superbooster Phil Knight.
    “You do not have my blessing,” Calipari remembers Knight saying. “So I didn’t hire him.”
    But when Oregon changes coaches, Calipari is entering his second season at Kentucky, a Nike flagship program. Calipari wastes little time calling Knight back: “I said, ‘Phil, you know where I am and Kenny deserves to have this opportunity.’ ”
    When he brings Payne on board, Calipari knows exactly what he’s getting: an ace recruiter, a tireless instructor and a man with connections across basketball. Now, nine seasons later, Payne’s charm, diligence and influential contacts have paid off. While Payne’s close association with Nike is certainly helpful, it doesn’t exactly separate him from the college basketball crowd. However, few other recruiters have an edge like Payne’s long history with Worldwide Wes, who has had a nationwide network that shepherds prospects from youth basketball through the pros for nearly two decades.
    Wesley is not a registered agent, merely a consultant with Creative Arts Agency. But as his nickname suggests, he is seemingly everywhere — be it at one of Mike Krzyzewski’s Team USA Olympic workouts, courtside at the Nike Skills Academy or postgame in the Kentucky locker room.
    And while there’s nothing wrong with keeping old friends, Wesley’s influence with elite players brings with it intensified scrutiny for any coach on his speed dial. And that’s before the FBI decided to bear down on corruption in college basketball.
    In February 2018, Yahoo Sports reported the FBI had evidence of Bam Adebayo, a center at Kentucky in 2016-17, appearing on the financial records of the agency ASM Sports in connection to a $36,500 loan. Creative Arts Agency and Wesley were not involved, though the finding underscores the pervasiveness of agents around college programs, including Kentucky.

    As PJ Washington warms up across the court at Kentucky’s practice facility this summer, Payne makes his pitch for why a high-major program should give him a shot as its head coach, wondering aloud just how many assistants have his credentials.
    “I don’t know the answer,” Payne says, “but I do know this: I try to be a man of integrity and character and faith.” No one has asked about his reputation on the recruiting trail, but Payne alludes to it anyway. “And I’ve never cheated to get a kid.”
    Payne sounds eager to address the elephant in the room. He has signed a lot of exceptional players in a sport where top prospects and their handlers often expect to be compensated for their commitment.
    “My mission started at Oregon under Ernie Kent,” says Payne. “And it continues at Kentucky under John Calipari: Do it the right way and do right by these kids.”
    Payne believes people who see recruiting as the Wild West nowadays, well, they just don’t know. “When I came out of high school,” Payne says, “coaches were saying anything to get you to sign. I’ll promise you a house. I’ll get you a car. You’ll have an allowance. Then to become a coach and see there’s a different way, it really made an impression on me. It may be harder and you may lose a bunch of kids, but that’s all right because you can sleep at night.”
    Kentucky hasn’t lacked for attracting elite talent under Calipari. The Wildcats have signed an astonishing 18 five-star recruits in the last four classes, but not one of them was a top-five prospect. That isn’t for lack of interest; Calipari says his staff has backed away from some shady recruitments in recent years.
    “If it’s something we’re not willing to do,” he says, “we walk.”

    Payne makes no secret of wanting to run his own program, which would give him a shot at becoming the first man in NCAA basketball history to win a championship as a player (Louisville, 1986), assistant (Kentucky, 2012) and head coach.
    “Kentucky basketball will definitely take a hit if he leaves,” says Davis. “Guys who go there after he’s gone would be missing out on one of the best player development coaches I’ve worked with.”
    Payne has been connected to openings at DePaul, Mississippi State and Louisville. Kentucky pays him $900,000, a salary that allows him to be selective about opportunities, but no power conference program has seriously considered him.
    Maybe schools hesitate because of his lack of head coaching experience; only four of last season’s Top 25 teams were led by someone in his first head coaching job. Maybe it’s the color of his skin—only two Top 25 teams had African-American head coaches.
    Or perhaps it’s the shadow cast by his boss, Calipari, who the NCAA forced to vacate Final Fours at two previous stops; or by his first boss, Brown, who ran afoul of NCAA rules at three schools; or by his college coach, Crum, who had to give back two seasons at Louisville.
    No man is ever guilty by mere association. However, for the first time the finger-pointing has been directed not at one of his bosses, but straight at Payne. In August, an extortion case involving controversial lawyer Michael Avenatti and Nike turned up a text-message conversation between Payne and Nike executive Carlton DeBose, who is alleged to have funneled payments to families of high-level recruits.
    In the exchange on July 6, 2017, Payne asks DeBose whether he “helps” a couple of grassroots coaches and “how many more people asked you to help them?” DeBose replies with a list of about 10 other Nike league coaches who he says are “helping families to the total of about ($200,000) annually.” Payne responds: “Wow,” and later, “Can it come back n hurt you?” DeBose tells him probably not, but risk is just a hazard of the job. “Watch your back bro,” Payne tells him.
    There is no other mention of Payne or Kentucky in a 50-page court filing that accuses Nike of conspiring to pay tens of thousands to Zion Williamson (Duke), Romeo Langford (Indiana) and an unnamed high school star in Michigan. Calipari says he is not alarmed by the text messages, although he doubts his detractors feel the same.
    “He basically wanted (DeBose) to do right, which would have been good,” Calipari says, “but because it’s us …”
    “There’s no get-rich-quick scheme at Kentucky,” says Paul Washington, whose son, PJ, was a five-star recruit in 2017. “If somebody brought that to Kenny, he’d just straight-up tell you, ‘If that’s what you need to do, go ahead somewhere else, but we don’t do that here.’ ”
    Still, when Ellison pleaded with Louisville to consider his former teammate when it was replacing Rick Pitino last year, the administration never seriously considered Payne. Meanwhile, Memphis hired Penny Hardaway and Michigan brought back Juwan Howard — alums with no college coaching experience — to lead their programs. So if Payne’s alma mater isn’t willing to cut him a break, Calipari is more than willing to keep cutting him a check
    “Look, I understand and the university understands his importance to this program and these players,” Calipari says. “We’ve rewarded him that way and will probably reward him even more.”

    PJ Washington has returned to Lexington this summer hoping to shake off a little rust. He sprained his foot in the 2019 SEC tournament, sat out Kentucky’s first two NCAA Tournament games and delivered two epic performances on a still-bum wheel in the Sweet 16 and Elite Eight. But after the tournament, he shut it down again so the injury could completely heal.
    By July, the first-round pick of the Hornets still isn’t medically cleared for running, but that doesn’t stop Payne from pushing the pace during a relentless 60-minute shooting session. Payne spends a good portion of the workout ignoring the flight of the ball, instead watching Washington’s feet, shoulders and right elbow, correcting every little mistake. He is also trying to exhaust him.
    Washington is part of the parade of NBA studs who return for Payne’s offseason tune-ups. (Kyle Tucker/The Athletic)

    “I know you can come in here fresh to death,” Payne says. “I want to know what you can do totally fatigued. The NBA wants to see what you’re willing to do that no one else will.”
    Washington has put up hundreds of shots, nonstop, from all over the floor, with Payne standing right beside him barking orders. Sometimes a student manager waves a tall, padded pole in Washington’s face. His gray T-shirt has turned several shades darker and could probably fill a water bottle if wrung out. He believes he is finished.
    Payne looks like a man at home out on the practice floor, connected to this place, these players and those pros who return. For now, he loves them too much to leave them.
    “OK,” Payne says, “Twenty more.”
    “Twenty more makes?” Washington asks incredulously.
    Payne nods and grins.
    “Fuuuuuuuuck,” Washington groans.
    “Welcome back,” Payne says with a familiar deep belly laugh. “Welcome to Kentucky.”

  2. #632
    12th man
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    12,006
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by htr10 View Post
    Knicks not fooling around with spending money on front office and staff. In theory, Payne could be transformative for player development. My biggest concern is whether or not all these pieces can come together.
    Payne’s claim to fame is recruiting, kids are attracted to Kentucky because they develop under him with the relentless workouts he puts them through. He’s also more known as a guru for big men but I guess his programs can be applied to any position. College is different from the pro’s so let’s see if his program translates to the NBA. I do think KK benefits tremendously under him, I’d expect to see a breakout season and his best in the pros for Knox.

  3. #633
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,106
    Rep Power
    25

    Default

    Rose isn’t a dummy... you don’t get to where he got otherwise. He’s obvious had an idea of how he would run a show, and we are now seeing his grand plan.

    Smart people surround themselves with smarter people.

    Rangers won a (rigged) lottery.... Rose and the Developers will fix Knox-Knits, they will maximize RJ and MRob’s potential.

    Nobody can fix DSJ. Oh well...

    But we got drafts picks coming....

    Could be a good decade at MsG.

  4. #634
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,106
    Rep Power
    25

    Default

    Knox is happy:

    Wow, what a great birthday surprise.....Congratulations Coach KP! Welcome to the Knicks Family. 🙏🏽💪🏽

  5. #635
    12th man
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    12,006
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tiger0330 View Post
    I don't think Kenny Payne takes the job after reading he's the highest paid asst coach in college bball and his son Zan is going to play for Kentucky this year. 900K in Kentucky has to be like 1.5M in NY when you have to have dual residences in both places and are the Knicks offering that kind of money to him to become an asst to Thibs? Even more important, watching your son play for the team you coach has to be a special once in a lifetime moment that you have to think hard about missing. Add to the uncertainty about a Knicks position that has an average tenure of a couple of years vs the 9 years he's been at Kentucky and I don't think it adds up to a decision to take a job with the Knicks
    I was wrong about Kenny coming to NY but right on about the bucks he’d be making. He’s making lead asst money, reportedly one of the highest asst coach salaries in the NBA. Ty Lue signed $6.5M 4 yr. contract as an asst with the Cavs was one of the highest Asst contracts as a comparison.

    I was wondering if Kenny would be the lead asst for Thibs making that kind of money but it seems he’s slated to be the main player development guy with the Knicks perhaps not filling the vacant Craig Robinson job.



    Last edited by tiger0330; Aug 12, 2020 at 15:49.

  6. #636
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,106
    Rep Power
    25

    Default

    Given his relationship with Knox, and all the under 23 yr old kids... worth every penny. Looks like we earnestly want to develop the kids

  7. #637
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    7,720
    Rep Power
    19

    Default

    Mitchell Robinson officially sets all-time single season FG% record.

  8. #638
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,106
    Rep Power
    25

    Default

    Congrats MRob! A Little Confidence Booster!

  9. #639
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    7,720
    Rep Power
    19

    Default

    The Nets really do have the magic touch. They are paying 69 million to 2 guys this season who aren’t playing that they signed in free agency this last offseason, they are getting killed in the 1st round of the playoffs, and they have no coach, but no one has one critical thing to say about them.

    We lose in a lottery and it somehow further affirms how bad we suck.

  10. #640
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,106
    Rep Power
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by htr10 View Post
    The Nets really do have the magic touch. They are paying 69 million to 2 guys this season who aren’t playing that they signed in free agency this last offseason, they are getting killed in the 1st round of the playoffs, and they have no coach, but no one has one critical thing to say about them.

    We lose in a lottery and it somehow further affirms how bad we suck.
    So true. And we all no this will crash and burn worse than the KG-PP BKLYN squad. KD and Kyrie will come up small next post season, and the media will probably give them a free pass.

  11. #641
    Veteran
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,999
    Rep Power
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by htr10 View Post
    The Nets really do have the magic touch. They are paying 69 million to 2 guys this season who aren’t playing that they signed in free agency this last offseason, they are getting killed in the 1st round of the playoffs, and they have no coach, but no one has one critical thing to say about them.

    We lose in a lottery and it somehow further affirms how bad we suck.
    And even if we won the lottery people would still laugh at how ****ty our luck is because we won the lottery in a year where the draft sucks

  12. #642
    Member KNICKS MOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    335
    Rep Power
    4

    Default

    As the off season approaches, we're being linked to VanVleet once again. Do you guys think we should pursue even if his asking price is in the $25 million a year range?

    I know its steep but I'm leaning towards that move. I feel like a good PG would help our young players improve quicker, also I don't trust any of the PGs coming outta this draft. We really haven't had a good floor general in a while so I think that also contributes to our young guys never fully developing.

  13. #643
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,106
    Rep Power
    25

    Default

    I read on a SA page the following laugher:

    “These factors could push the Spurs to try to move one or both of their stars this summer. If that’s the case, they could find a worse trade partner than the Knicks.

    With young talent like Kevin Knox and still valuable veterans like Maurice Harkless, not to mention a top-ten pick in the upcoming draft, the Knicks could put together an enticing package in a sign-and-trade deal that would send DeMar DeRozan to New York. While they may be interested in LaMarcus, DeRozan’s age, and his lack of a positional overlap with Mitchell Robinson, likely makes him the more attractive of the two players, at least to the Knicks.”

    DeRozan is 31 and LaMarcus is 35.

    The Knicks aren’t 1 or 2 or maybe even 3 stars away... why would Rose trade both a young player and a lottery pick? Dealing even 1 asset for this return is asinine.

  14. #644
    12th man
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    12,006
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KNICKS MOB View Post
    As the off season approaches, we're being linked to VanVleet once again. Do you guys think we should pursue even if his asking price is in the $25 million a year range?

    I know its steep but I'm leaning towards that move. I feel like a good PG would help our young players improve quicker, also I don't trust any of the PGs coming outta this draft. We really haven't had a good floor general in a while so I think that also contributes to our young guys never fully developing.
    I think you have to try but the Knicks would probably be spinning their wheels with TOR having the contracts of Ibaka and Gasol expiring giving them plenty of cap space to sign their young star. Joe Harris might be a more realistic guy for us to acquire though not with the same skill sets as Vanvleet but a skill, shooting the Knicks need.

  15. #645
    Veteran mafra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,106
    Rep Power
    25

    Default

    The Knicks intend to chase Davis Bertans in free agency, according to a new report from NBC Sports, and though New York will face fierce competition for the Latvian Laser, the news suggests a competent front office with a basic understanding of the modern NBA.

    Bertans, who is 6’10” and turns 28 in November, is a career 41% three-point marksman coming off his best year in four professional seasons.

    He sat out the bubble as a preventative measure to make sure he wouldn’t suffer a serious injury that could hurt his chances of landing a big contract, and according to Chase Hughes of NBC Sports, Bertans will be receiving interest from a number of teams, including current employer the Washington Wizards and the Knicks, as well as the Atlanta Hawks and Phoenix Suns.

Similar Threads

  1. ESPN Insider "Are the Knicks Legit"
    By tiger0330 in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Jan 05, 2013, 21:46
  2. Diehard Knicks Blog: Lebron is more "Magic" than "Air"
    By goldenchild1688 in forum NY Knicks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 25, 2010, 15:52
  3. Replies: 26
    Last Post: Jun 20, 2009, 17:41
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: Dec 26, 2008, 17:43
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: Jun 22, 2007, 11:40

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •